(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Campanile"

THE CAMPAXILK 

li i it e i e €* n - / h i m* t if 



A 



S il is«i i*4>iiiiii4'ii< 



(Isifioil of SI iii4M»4l 



liiiiilMUisin in fiiiil ti;:iiii«» 



ill a \vi«lo \v4mmI. it i»i no 



iiii|»iitaii4»ii if iio iisilii 



ii4»i l'«»iiii«l ail. — #'//f/o 




THE CAMl'AiNlLE — Suow, sunlight, and shadow lend a novel cliurm to llic familiar landmark 



THE 



CAMPANILE 



NINETEEN THIRTY 



Fifteenth Annual Reeoril 
pnblislied by the J^tutlentN 
of The Rice Institnte at 



« « Ilonston 




T e X a s » » 



Flotelierllrowii Wliiinov Kea«ler 

EflitO f •- ill -Chief it « « l ## v s s 3ia n n If V r 



Printt'd hif 
T li 4^ IK o i II V €» III |i Si II V 



JEntjruvctl bif 
Parko Engraving To. 



10 V *• o mii o n s h #/ 



f * h o / o f/ 1' a p h If h if 
Will'i'od II. Siodiiiaii IKo iil a ii «l «' S i ii «l i o n 




IIARHY BOYER WEI SE R, Pn. D., Professor of Chemistry 



EDICATION 

To Dr. Harrv Boyer Weiser 
I ill liiiiuble reeo^uitlou of his devo- | 




B tlou to the atlvaiieeiiioiit ami ilevel- i 



I o|»iiieiitoi'RieoIiiJ!$tiliiie, uiaiiifoi^t- | 



I cd hy lii!!$ own tirele!!$ii» effort!^ ami f 



I iirofouud aecoiupliNliiiieiitN, to the i 



end that it sliall lie acii.iio\vIedged a 



I great f oeiis of natural iilii1o^4»iiliy g 



i andseientii'ieaehieveinent.wedetl- 3 



I icate tliiiii viiliinie of the rsiiii|iaiii1e. 3 



FO R 



E W O 11 D 



ave sought io reflect 



ill our hook tlie .spirit of Ulee siiiil of 



Aiiieriesiii eoUege fifes lliit we iia\ e 



not foiiiiil it ill a eiiroiiiele of |i«ii*tie- 



iihir liafifieiiiiigs. Is it not rather in 



your yoiitlif iiK eager sit tltn«l€^? Tiiis 



liool4,afterali,eaiiionlysiiggestwiiat 



von liave felt. Ilelive vonr feelings 



into its pages. Yon iiisike lliee. anil 



yon alone eaii iiiake^ a Canifianile. 




ABLE OF CONTENTS 

BOOK 1 — iiXIVERSITY 1 



B Adniinisii*uitoit « Classes « Seniors 

I 'Juniors « Sophotnores « Freshtnen 

I BOOK 2 — CAMPUS « Sail t§ pott 

I Soeiely « Drantaiies « I^ablieaiiotts 



Ortjanizan'ons « BOOK 3 — VANITY FAIII 

BOOK 4— SPOBTS « i^ep « Fooihall 
Hashet Uall « Traek « Baseball 
Oihet^ Sports « Freshman Spot*ls «X: 
Inlramarals.HOOK 5-TllE BACK 




UNIVERSITY 



III 



at.»m!Mi..^A i i>HiJiiJii:.m^^'imu i jg BawB!^^ 






\1 

f 


- 




^?*i^ 






■y ; .., ?.'. ■■■■ 


.--■■,-■ ■ *j, ^^ ^j 




M 




•• • ".'.V- 


^'1 




.^^ 




1 

1 
II 


r 




u 




V / , \* 


I E 






— ^ 


• . 




^ 


iff^^ 


■w>"wSisn^3^p^^^^^^^ 


'■— 


^||!:^^^^ 


m 




*:..■:: 


,- - -- ^^^s^ii^ 




^^J.-m^x 



-^7 




%^ 




^. 



!s^S^'- " ~ 



i?g^i' 




ADM I ^ I STR ATION 



T 




EDG AK ODKLL LO\ ETT, Pll. D., LL.D.. Piesid<;ii oj the Insiiiui, 



rji 



IS 



Sd M 4i 



TO RICE NINETEEN-TTTIKTV 

I wijli you time. I wish m>ii the spirit of hope and a sense of Inniinr. I wisli vou imaginative 
sympathy with all conditions of men. a hvely interest in all humanitarian undertakings, 
prompt and unhesitating initiati\e in all good uorks. I wish \ ou reason and reserve, right- 
mindedness and resoureeiidness. I u i>li \ ou taste and tael. lol<'ranee. and leTiaiit\. I uish 
you truth. I ui>h \ ou years of \ outh. ami \ i-ars and years of usefulness. 

1 liaye no magic wand uitli \shich to raise these half dozi'n wishes into reality for vou. Nor 
<lo vou e\p<'el anv su<'h sleight of hand or >leight of mind on m\ |iart. I Jideed. u eri' ser\ iee 
of this sort within in\ pouer. its exercise would Ik- a distinct disservice, for these wishes are 
not mere words, ihev are ideas, and ideas are uon onl\ hx the will and the \wirk to win llieui. 
You have already been winning them in om- form or another, because, whether \ ou ha\e 
been always conscious of the fact or not. \ our actual liusiness here for the last lour years has 
been a still hunt lor idi"a> and their impliiations. now on new trails, and now on old. \iid 
where ha\e vou lound their native haunts.'' I douht if an\ man knows. I )o lhe\ come Irmn 
within, or from without'.'' if from within, how.' If from without, whenci-.'' Min ha\e always 
been divided as to the origin of ideas. The\ are di\ ided still. We ndghl argue the mat ler till 
sundow n. and (roin sundow u till morning. Ilii' im|)ortant thing is that we has <■ them. 

^ hatever their origin, the fai t is that these ideas, truth, hope, imagination, reason, toler- 
ance, and so on. carr\ on in ihr traditions of the education in which you have been engaged. 
Anil what are those traditions? .Some of tli<-ui are ridigion. which gives sanelions to \irlue, 
sequence to history, salt and savor to life: and freedom, guaranteeing to ini-ri their indl\ idu- 
alitv in thought and action; and dis'.ipline. guarding Iri'edom ironi lanaticism and libi'rlv 
from license: and science, with its unhurrving search lor fails and relations among facts, 
from cells to consciousness, ions to cosmos, ami return: and sport, with its light-hearted en- 
thusiasm for physical fitness, fair play, and thi> jov of lih': and service, with its disinterested 
zeal for philanthropy and the connnon weal: and deniocrai-\. which, despite sonu' limita- 
tions, brings to our secular relationshi|is a new dignitx in all the walks (d men. 

These traditions have stood about \iniv tents in this |)lace. Thev ha\e heaten into \our 
armor the ideas 1 have wished vou. Ther<' is little time left for buckling on tli<' armor, for the 
bugles are blowing and tin' battle is already going on. — Edgvr Odell Loveit. 




KITE INSTITUTE 
B O A IS II O E T Rini» T E E !$ 




James Addison Bakkk 



W iLLiAM Marsh liicE. ,|k. 



C'lmiriiiiiii 



)ii\ Thaddeis Scott 



f ico-Chdinnan 3 



I icv-Cliuinuun 



Rkn.ivmin Botts KrcE 



Sc(rcl(iry-1 ri'dsiir 



Kdgvk Odell Lo\ et 



Alexander Sessl.ms Cleveland 3 



\]\>\\ M!D AnDRE^V I'eDEN 



'//((■ picliiies jiillinr llic anlcr iif luinu 



3 
1 



II 



ff .-^ ^' 


0F^- 




%>• ^^ 





R I € E 1 > S T 1 T r T K 

O F F I i E IR S O F A II 31 1 X i S T « A T I O X 



KUGAK OUELL LoVKTT 



Robert (iK\NviLLE Caldwell 



Sa.mlel Glenn McCann 



John Ttiom \s McCants 



I 

i 



E 

i 

E 



I'icsiilrnt 



Ihai, 



Hcilislrttr 



Hill s(ir 



The picluns joUim- lliv iiiiIit ii] ikiiiws. 




I 111 K PICTURES 

g Top — Roiv /.Vesey, Haden. (Jiirrisdii. 

I RowJ: Hiill.n. l>;iMir. Rolil,. 



^ HoTKiM K(i(( /■ Tlionia^. ^ ;iii Zaiiill. 

E ll(>i>kiii>. 

I 

E Ran- 2: NoincII. ()ui'iis. Join's. 

E 

E Roll .i: K ill". ( )iiin. 





OJIircrs 

Ik \m:i8 \ i:sev Pn'sidenI 

lloMOiSELLE Haden I ice-Fresident 

David Garrison Treasurer 

John C. Ridley Secretary 

Homer Matthes. Cimntiliiian-at-large 

Senior Represi'iilalircs 

Lyle Payne John C. Ridley 

Kgerton Robb Evan Thomas 

W. K. ^'\^ Z\NDT 

Jiiniiir Rejtresentatives 
\l UiK llol'KINS llMi\i;V N<>K\KI.L 

Joe Owens 

Sophomore Repreaentatires 

K \Li»H Jones M vrcelle King 

Iresliniiiii Ripnseiiliil'ne KoHEKT (^)lIN 

SlM(lcnl (louniil is llic govi'riiing IxxK of 
llic Shidi'iil \ssociation. Tlic |piii|m)si' of the Asso- 
cialion is lo or;.fanize and s\ sli-inali/.c inlcrclass and 
inlrni>llcf;iat<" relations, ilass tiislonis. and |>ri\i- 
lc;i(s. and to diiect sncli matters perlainini; to the 
hcst interests of Riee Institnle as eonie uithin the 
|iro\ in<-i' of the student Ixxh . 



3 

a 




THE PICTURES | 

Pol' — liiiir 1: .l(>ne>. lloilock. p 

3 

Ron 2: lllif;. \ll<ii. | 

3 
3 
3 
% 

HoiTOM — Koic /: Hfnsli\. .|;i(i)li<'. 3 

3 

Htm 2: llarliuiir. Minis. 3 

=s 

Koir i; McKlwee. I 



3 



0//ir.T.s 

BijiH Jones C.lutirmnii 

Lillian Horlock Secretary 

Senior Heprrseiitiilires 

liusH Jones Lillian Horlock 

C vRi. Illk;. Jr. 

Junior Rejireivnlnlires 

H. L. Hensley Ri S.SEL Lee Jacobe 
Joe Allen 

Sophomore Reprerienliilires 

Ray Harboi r IIkndkkson Mims 

Fresltninn Ripre^enliilire 

Mary McElwee 



The duties of llic Honur (iduiuil are to j;o\ciri riuilteis 
pertaining to the honor and welfare (d the xliool as a 



whole. This 



l><>il\ lu 



andles matters of honor ol ^-Indenls 



g both in class and elsewhere. 




woMAA's roi xriL 



p The Pictures 

i 

E 

£ Tor: Horh.rl.. Hrnv. 

I 

£ HorroM: Sli'iiiiil. II illidins: 'hil/iclicl. 

fc (iiijjm: I'Idiiiliii. limiillr. 










I.ILLIW lloHl.ocK I'rcsiilcnl 3 

\1 VKY IIallie IJerry. . . J'icc-Presirlcnt % 

Martha Stewart . . Secretarv-Trecisiin'r 3 

1 1 elen Williams Member- At-L<tigp 3 



Senior Members 

llllia^ iiorlock 
Mary Hallie Berry 



Junior Members 

Martha Stewart 
Mary Tallichet 



Soi>ii<im<>re \ lentbers 
Le((\()R V l'l,()WDE>! 

,|() IJeth (tKiffin 



Frrsliiunn Member 3 

Irm\ Fonvtlle a 

riic |Mii|H)sc (if the Wdinan s (^(iiimil 3 

^liall lie Id (li'al wllh niattcrs |i('itaiiiiiif; 3 

imI\ lip uoiiicirs inloicsls. willi llio ex- 3 

■lijsioii (if llial aiillidiilN residing' in llic % 

I loniii' ( loimcil. 3 




HALL rOMMBTTEE | 

a 

The Pictures g 

Top: Kciiilrirk-. iraiil. % 

Bottom: Hvde, Rdulins: SanniiiiK I, a 
RoYse; Koeppe. % 



E Michael Cl vrk Kemjuicr Cluiirinuii 

I East Hall 

% Michael Clark Kendrick 

E Hugh Avant 

E Nick Hvde 

E 

I Soulh Hull 

% Erle Rawlins 

E Marshal R. Sangi inet 

E Graham Boone 



Fred Royse 

French Arnold 

Erle Koeppe 



Under tlie provision of tiie Student Assoeiation a 
hall committee is elected anmiall\, «]iose diitv il is to 
direct and regulate life in the residential halls to t 
hest interests of the residents. 




I 



1 ^ 






T II K V A t V L T Y 

■nil, I'ICTURES 
Poi': lliriihiiiii. Ixsiiii. 
Bottom: li oh r fii'oi s, Bntv: liidcl,- 
er. liniirnr: Ctildinll. 

Kdgvu \i,i i;mu ii<.. t'li.U., .If^slskinl 

PriijCssor <(/ Hiiihiilx. 
Ali;,mmiho \iiii\iiv. H. \.. Jnsiniclor in 

Sjxinifih. 



^^1 


4%v*>&'' , 




\^J 


V ^^ 




_^^I_ 


A'i 




iiJ 


^ 


M 




I'KVNKLiiv Durham AsHCRAFT. H. \.. In- 
slructor in Physical Education. 

SrocKTo^i AxsoN. LiTT.D.. L.H.D., Pio- 

j'essor of Englif'li Lilridlnrc. 

Joseph Llovd livnisrv. M.\.. Insiriic- 
tor in Sfxmiali and Italian. 

Leonard M. Blimenthvi,. Ph.D.. In- 

sIriHloi in Matliiiualics. 

Vndre Georces lioi R(;kots. B. in Arts. 
B. ill Law. Inslrucloi in French. 

IJARKV Lee Bo^^ ion. I'm.!).. Insirncior 
in European Hinlorv. 

1 1 1 BERT Evelyn Bk \^ . I'h.D.. Asf^istnnt 
Professor of Malhenialics. 

IllGO Broeker. I'll. I).. Instructor in 
(ierinan. 

Charle-s Loum\n Buoune. B. Vicli.. 
Instructor in Irchilt'clural Construc- 
tion. 
FRl'iDloiiKK \\ ii.i.i\M \iRO\\yE. I nstriK tor in ircliitcctural Draic- 

inii mill I'liintiiiii. 
Andrew IJoinneli. ISryan. Ph.D., Instructor in Physics. 

RoRKRT (;i! \\\ll,LE CvLDWEl.l,. Pll.D.. Professor of American 
History anil Dean of the Institute. 

Asv ( '.n\\\ lOllll ( hlANDLER. Ph.D.. Professor of liiologv. 
Kmis Cimi.i.mw. Jr.. F.A.A.R.. M.\.I.\.. Issistant Pm- 
jessiir of irihiteelure. 



KA1 i 'AJ V 




TIIK PICTURES 

Toi'; ('.liiinillcr. ('.hillinim. 

\ityr'ro\\:Engi'rr(in(L Eraiis: Ford. In iiiul: 
Hfirtiiiau. 

KoHKKT R. Crookston. I$.S. in _\I.E., 
I iislriicldr in Mi'ilidiiiidl Engineering. 

Kenneth Damk.rdn. I'm. I).. Insiruclar 
in Economics. 



Charles He^vitt Di\. M. \.. Insiniclur 
in Mathematics. 

Jacqies Jean Engerrand. M.A., 7/;- 
striictor in French. 

Griffith Conrad Evws. Ph.D.. Pro- 
fessor of Pure Mathematics. 

AuGUSTO Eyquem. Bachelor of Hu- 
manities. Instructor in Spaniel). 

Lester R. Ford, Ph.D.. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics. 

Max Freund. Ph.D.. Professor of Ger- 
man. 

Joseph Stephen Gallegly, Jr.. M.A.. 
Instructor in English. 

Allen Darnaby Garrison, Ph.D., As- 
sistant Professor of Physical Chemistry. 

WlLLl\M Hartman, M.A.. Instructor in 
English. 

Arthur J. Hartsook. M.S.. Assistoni 
Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ray Nelson Haskell, B.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Claude William Heaps, Ph.D.. Professor of Physics. 

Herbert Kay TTimphrey. M.S. in E.E., E.E.. Professor of 
Electrical Engineering. 

W.alter Raymond Kirner. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organ- 
ic Chemistry. 

Floyd Seyward Lear, Ph.D., Assistant Professor oj History. 

Edgar Odell Lovett. Ph.D.. IX.D.. Professor of Mathematics 
and President of the Institute. 




••i3 rj 



r^ cS (!^ 



THE PICTURES 
Top: Heaps, Humphrey. 

Bottom: Lear. Lovett: Lynch. McCann: 
McCants. Mrkillop. 

Jarmon Alms LY^'CH. Ph.D.. InsinicUir 

in Education. 
Samuel Glenn McCann, M.A.. In- 

itru<l(ir in Jurispru(h nee anil Retiis- 
Iriir (il lh< 1 nslilule. 





John Thomas jNIcCants. M.A.. Instruc- 
tor in Business Adniinistnitian and 
Bursar of the Institute. 

Alan Digald McKillop. Ph.D.. _Js- 
sistnnl Professor of English. 

AlSTlN Mardon, M.A.. Lecturer in Eng- 
lish History. 

John Marshall Miller, B.S. in E.E., 
Instructor in Engineering Drawing. 

Loi IS Gardner Miller, B.A., Instruc- 
tor in French. 

Pl'KYEAR MiMS, M.A.. Instructor in 
English. 

Marcel Morald, Agrege tie l"Uiiiversi- 
te de France, Professor of French . 

Charles William AIorris, Jr., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

Lewis Morton Mott-Smith, Ph.D., 
Instructor in Physics. 

Henry Oscar Nicholas, Ph.D.. In- 
structor in Clieniistry. 

Eugene Jean Oberle, M.A., Instructor 
in French. 

Frank Acklen Pattie, Jr., Ph.D., In- 
structor iti Psychology. 

John Virgil Pennington. M.E., In- 
structor in Mechanical Engineering. 



I 




THE PTCTURKS 
Tup: Mardon. ./. M. Miller. 

Bottom: L. G. Miller. Minis: Mnniitil. 
^rorris■. F. J. Noch. S. A. Nock. 

.|i)si;i>ii Horace Pound. B.S. in M.E., 
iiiid \l .K., Professor of Mechanical En- 
iiiiieering. 

TlBOR Rado, Ph.D.. Lecturer in Mallie- 
inatics, second semester. 



Earl Milford Rice. M.D., D.T.iVr. & 

H.. Instructor in Biology. 

Le>vis Babcock Ryon. ,Tr.. C.E.. Pro- 
fessor of Civil Engineering. 

Arthur Ferdinand Scott. Ph.D.. In- 
structor in Analxticid Clieniistrv. 

Harry Alexander Scott, Ph.D.. Pro- 
fessor of Phvsicnl Education. 

Lee M. Sharrar, _M.A., Instructor in 
Economics. 

Fred Vernon Shelton. M. A.. Instruc- 
tor in French. 

Verne F. Simons, M.A., Instructor in 
Economics. 

John Willis Slaughter. Ph.D., Lec- 
turer in dries and Philanthropy. 

James Harry Smith. M.A.. Instructor 
in English. 

Morris Albion Stewart. Ph.D.. In- 
structor in Biology. 

Radoslav Andrea Tsanoff. Ph.D., 
Professor of Philosophy. 

Leo Vernon Uhrig. B.S. in C.E., In- 
structor in Civil Engineering. 

Florin Vasilesco. Docteur es Sciences, 
Lecturer in Mathematics, first semester. 




: i*&:m» 



TlIK PlCTLfRES 

Top: Oh, rl, . I'allir. 

Hoi'l'iiM: I't 'iniriiilim. I'liiiiid: Hyoii.U. I. 
Sciilt: Shiirrdr. Siiiiai:^. 

,1 \Mi;s StKIMIEN \\ \ I'KKS. B.,S.. Ilislllic- 
tor in Etip.ir.1 > riisii. 

W IMIVM W \UI>\\ \TMN. \I. \.l. \.. Plo- 

/. ssar III Irchih tluri . 





Il\l!l!1 l!(l"lKR \\ KISER. I'll. I).. l'lilj(S- 
sor 11/ ('III iiilslrw 

W ii.i.ivM KmcKsdN \\ iiiTK. U.S. in (l.K. 
Insirui III! in (nil hnginii riiiii. 

C.VAmcE Wesley Whitiinc. I'h.D.. In- 

slractiir in English. 

(;e(ik(;i. (iiioN Williams. _\1.A.. In- 

stnulnr in I'.nillish. 

II \KOLD Albert Wilso>'. M.S<'.. D.Sc, 
I'rofissiir (ij Physics. 

Wll.LIVM (ioRDDN ZkEVELI). \I.A.. hl- 

sti uiiiir in l-'niilish. 

ASSISTANTS :iii,l FELLOWS 

Im)\v\ri) Bowers Arrams. B.S. in 
Vnli.. I'lllincin trchitertun: 

L,I>\M\ I'oKI) HE(:kE\HAf:H, M.A.. /'('/- 

/"(( //) MiiiIk niiiliis. 

\\ 11,1.1 \M liii:ii\ni) Hiiii>i,\\ \ I i:n. B. \.. 
ii lion in llisliir\ . 

I'llOMAS SlIKLKY (;il\l'M\N. .i«.- B. \.- 
lelhnc in Chemistry. 

.losEPH li.oTT Davies, M.A.. Assistant 
in Biiiloiiy. 

Xi.icE Crowell Dean. M. \.. i'lllon- in 
Miithi'iinilics. 



¥. (\ ' ¥. B '• 



r'i'i 




THE PIC IL KES 

T(H>: Slaitfihli r. Siiiilli. 

lidiroM: 'l\(iit('lj. I (isihsin: /( ,/m,. |( //- 
liiiiiis: 11 il\iiii. /, I r. /(/. 

EiiH \i{i) .|iisi;i'iii Dimiwi. M.\.. I'd- 
Inn ill ( 'lit iiii.\iry. 

W IM 1 \\r Mi;\nn II \nm m. |{. V.. /,//.-/( 

I II ( 'III ////,s// \ . 



I'\l L l)l \\K II \l!\\(>(ll). U.S.. FilliiH ill 

Hitiliiiiw 

CiVDE Roland .Ioiin-on. H. \.. iillmi 
ill Chemistry. 

Clare Hiuberd Ki;v>. li. \.. I'lllau in 
Physics. 

W \LDO Forest McNeih. li. \.. Fillon 
in Kniilish. 

(tEORGeFvyne M<>NTGOMi;in . Jr.. li. \.. 

Felldir ill Physics. 

Addisdn Stayton l\i nn. R.S. in Anli.. 
FcUmc in Architecture. 

Felix I'volin. Jr.. H. \.. I < linn in 
Chemistry. 

Phil Brewster Pr)\vEKs. B.A.. Fillmr 
in Binlnfiy. 

Willi \\i Monkoic Kist. Ji!.. M, \.. / r/- 
linc in Matliemiilics. 

\ ERNuv Pri ETT ScHi H utnr. B. \.. (s- 
sistanl in Biology. 

William Josiaii J'wlou. Jr.. li. \.. /W- 
loic in Physics. 

Kldoli'ii Frederick W eich \ki'. .Ik.. 
B.A.. Fellow in Physics. 

Pierce McDoald Willi vmson. li. \.. 

Felloic ill Chemistry. 




i44k 



1^ 





t |rti > 



.■4a I " 



I 




CLASSES 




i 



THE ASSOCIATION OF RICE ALUMNI 

\\ . \1 . Sta>dish. Class of "10 Presidcnl 

Ann \ K. Lay. Class of "2H Vice-Prcsidcnl 

Ervin F. K\lb. Class of T() Treasurer 

\\ ii.DON B. Cabamss. Class of "28 E.xeciitiie Secretary 



Execulirc Ciiinm illee 

James Ira Campbell. Class of "24 
W. Leslie Colkmvn. Class of "23 

Mrs. W. NL Strei-.tm \n. Class of "22 

E. D. Shepherd. Jr.. Class of "2.i 

J. B. Farthmw. Class of "25 

Mrs. W. 1!. I'kvmmkll. Class of "27 



The Association of Rice Almiiiii iiircl^ lion of permanent ciKlounienl therefor. 

luiic a \iai. ( )n Thanksgiving Da\ a lnisi- With this end in view, the "Riee Night" 

iie-> iiiecliiij; is held, and at eoniineiieeineiil |,rogranis are held hiennialK. the first 

tinii' the inend)ers assenihle again for a re- liavin" taken nlaee in "'^7. 

union. Meanwhile, .-..nneetions are main- „,„ „,,, ,,,„^, amhitious plan that the 

tairied li\ a magazine i>ni>li>lii'd li\ e lime> .. , , • i ■ f 

^ ' Munini memliers have vet eoneeived is tor 



the erection of a half milli4in dollar class 



\iarl\. Tlic Hici' llaiuni Ncics. In llousloi 

hirichcoii^ are liehl weekU. and are well al- 

rooiH hnilding on the Campus, to lace th<' 
h iidcd h\ local Mumni. and similar meetinfis 



ail' held li\ groM|)s of \huuni in other cities. 



I'hvsics Building, and to he known as the 



I i,,o/ o^ .1 1 • .■ lu- Ai Ahuuni Meniorial Building. This enterprise 

In l')2()-2 1 the Association ol Kice Alumni '^ ' 

offere.l a «:!()() scholarship, to he awarded on ''^ '" '"■ li'^;^"f«•f^ hv subscription from iiiem- 
the grounds of scholarship, pcrsonalilv and ^"'''^ "f 'li'' '•i'^' twenty-five graduating (lass- 
pin siial vigor. This scholarship has siuic <-s of the Institute, and S51.(HH) has lieen 
liccn iiiaintaincd annualU. with the expecta- raised in jiledges to date. 



I 



-> 
< 



CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DE(;KEES 



^ [aster of Arts 



Willi \M \i\t iwni) Ijriih.w vm.h 
Mary Towell Carothers 
Thomas Shelby Chapman 
Pail Di \m: IIvrwood 



Ed\^ \Bri .1osi-:phi Dt riiwi 

M\R(;i hHiii: Di rrkttk \iiinn 
Ki)\\i\ liiiti) I >i:(Kr:\R \rii 

\\lLLIAM Uu M \HL) BuiDC ; \\ A 1 KU 

jNIary Saxtoiuj Campbell 
AIary Tdw ki.i- Carother.s 
Margaret Catterall 

I'iliiM \>. Sm KLBY ChAPM \^ 

Lady (iERi ri de \delf, (.'.c»\\ kn 
Joseph Tlott Davies 

Al 1)RK\ Ml HI 1. |)<»Mi;\N 

Gerald rnoM \s Donoghiie 

KdU ARD .[OSKI'HI Dl RHAM 

Mary Loi ise Fitc:i 
FRA^cES Flood 

CaTHERIM 1^)M)HEX 

Fredkrh k ni:K.sK Freyer 
MiRRY Jesse (iammill 
John Emmamel George 
\\ iLLiAM Leslie Golightly 

\\ ILLIAM ^lE\^,s HaNMM 

Paul Di \ne Mahwood 



Clmri; Hibbhru Ki.vn 
Louise Lenoir 

George Payne Montgomery. J m 
Pun, Rri:\\sikr Pow i-:rs 



\ KRNON TrIETT SgIILHABDT 

Flora Mc;I\ er Streetman 

\\ ILLIAM JOSIAH TaYLOR, Jr. 

Lira Topham 

IUdolph Fbederk k \\ in iii 



Uinior (if Piii{o\(ij>h\ 
\\\\ "\i:i.s()N Haskkll Clyde Rol\ni> Johnson 

GK \r)r\TE STUDENTS 



I loiisUm. Tex;is 

Dallas, Trxns 

Ilouslnii, T»"xas 

Honsloii. Texas 

Houston. Texas 

Gals. si. Ml. T.-\;is 

MrAI.-slrr. Oklahoma 

1 limsl m, Texas 

I loushtii. Texas 

H<^nislr>n, Texas 

HousI'MI, Texas 

Huiistoii. Texas 

Houslon. Texas 

I loiisloii. Trxas 

Houshm, Texas 

Savannah. ( leor^^ia 

Houslon, Texas 

Hnuslim, 'I'fxas 

Cisco. Texas 

Houslon, Texas 

rS'ewlane, \i'w \ ork 



Susie May R \R^Es Hill 
F>i:rt P\ul How krton 
m \delin j auohe 
(^.lADE RoL\M) Johnson 

K A I I-; KeKNE JtHINSON 

("laue Hibbi-;ri) Kean 
\mihi:\\ ,1 \( kson Kehoe 
Karl Emmett Koi-;i'pe 

ClIAHLINE EsTELLK LaLLIER 

Lot ISE Lenoir 

W M no Forest MuNeir 

Fred ALvhafee^. Jr. 

Homer Claren< e \Lvtthes 

Inis Erne Met/leb 

J \ml: Miles M(jnroe 

GlOIUiK P\>NE MoN niOMEK^ . J It 

Hmuin (Cooper Moore 
Felix Paquin, Jr. 

Full I'tRKW --1 lit I'oW ERS 

\\ \uui.N \lon/.o Hees 
H \ihael Dies High 



Houslon, Texas 

(.'.oi[)US Clirisli. Texas 

Houston. Texas 

Portlainl. Oregon 

Houslon, Texas 

W.-sl i.o. Ti-xas 

Houslon, Texas 

V\ Worlli. T.-xas 

Htiuslon. I'evas 

HousI m, Texas 

Ho\islon, Texas 





Houston. 


J'exas 




Ganado. 


Texas 




ilouslnn. 


J'exas 




Houston. 


Texas 




(r.orsicana. 


Texas 




Houslon. 


Texas 




( lalveston. 


Texas 


St 


Joseph. M 


ssouri 




Houslon, 


Texas 




Houston. 


Texas 



GRADUATE STVDKNTS-Coniln,,,;! 

W III I \\i MuMuiK Hi ST. Jr. Kobkivi \Vii,i.i \m Taiiii 

Hoiislon, Ti'xiis Himsroa, Texas 

\ IIINON 'I'. Scill II A lUCI' \\ 11,1,1 \M ,I(1SI \H Ta^ I ()H 

San .\nlonio, Texas Houslon, Texas 

.\\\\ \(nis(iN Si'iuM Li: V'hancis .r<>,si-:pii ( l^'lll■;R\\ (ion 

Houslon, Texas Houslon, Texas 

l)(iiuiiM\ Si ()\\ I 1.1. Si 1 ,\\ \n-r I^^ra^cis \V\^i.\mi \ Mskv 

llitustoii. Trxas Waco, Texas 

I "i on \ Ml I \ I II Si hi-;ktman Hi ihu im h'ui :iii:nh k \\ jk ii i:ht 

Houslon, Texas Welsh. Louisiana 

Ola Lkk Sti ltint. M \m.i, ( Iiihum.s W ilki^ 

Hnuslon. T.\as Houston, Texas 

CiiARi.]:s A mi \M Si M M hn I'm an Mi I )<in \i n \\ i i i i \ M-.itN 

Austin. I'exas Dallas, Texas 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Graham Baker Stinh'nt 

l^AHM^s ri.KTCiiKR LATHRf)P. T'liiss of I'HiO. ol" |'];isl Las \ ej^as, \fw Mexico 

Hiimmifflf Mcniinn for fhv (Graham HaLcr Sfittlcnishif) 

Elizabeth GoodsoiN, Class ol" 1931, oi" Kouslon, Texas 
John Tom Hurt, Class of 1931, cf Wan), Texas 
Carl Illig. Jr., Class of 1930, ol" Houslon, 'l"e\as 
Carolyn Marcelle Ring, Class of 1932, of Ilousidii. Tr\as 
Maud Elizabeth Krausnick, Class of 1931, of Houslon, Texas 
Mildred Estelle Ogg, Class of 1930, of Houslon, Texas 
Marie Celeste Olivari, Class of 1932, of Houslon, Texas 
Margaret Anne Toler, Class of 1930, of Houslon, Texas 
^■ol.A Mae Williams, Class of 1930, of Hay Cily, Texas 

I he Ihthculhal Schithirs 

Reuben Jackson Gallaw \u ( Juss of l<i:'.l. nf Hanger. Texas 
Lee Harnie Johnson, Jr., Class of 1930, of I larlintien, Texas 
Sanders Lyles, Class of 1930, of Ceiiler, Tr\as 
Violet Madeline AIattson, Class of 19;',]. of Houslon, Texas 
Thomas Richard Moore, Class of 1931, of Mouslon. Trxas 
Luke Osbtirn, Class of 19:io. of Wehsler. Ti'\as 

///(' Sharp Schohir^ In Cirlfs ami Piulanliiritpliy 

\ IRCINIA Dee Coombs, Class of 1930, of Houston, Texas 

Minnie Etkind. Class of 1930. of Houston, Texas 

.lon\ lAiMvM w, Gi onoK. Glass of I'I2''. of H<MistoM. '\\\.\^ 

Sfhttlar o/ ///(' Jnhii McKiiitt Alexander Chaplcr. Ihiuiihh^rs of ihc inifrlcan Hcnthitiaii 

I'J.I/.ABETII GOODSO^. (^.lassol l''i'.l. of lloiisloil, TrXMS 

VV/f IJh-}} \xsnn W llsini Scholar 

Helen Starker. Class i)f |o:',|. of L:i l-"rii;i. Texas 

Sfx'cial Axson Club Scholars 

M\B\ Frances Cullom, Glass of I'CK), of Houslon. Texas 
Helen Booth Williams, Glass of i<t3l. of Mouslon, T.^as 



■ I 



/I 



SCHOLARSHIPS -C-»/i///»/.r/ 

The Elizahclh Bdldwin Lilenirv Society Scholar 

James Hfcrbert Sawyer, Jr., Class of 1932, of Beaumotil, Ti'xas 

The AssdCKilidii oj Rice iliiiiini Scholar 

lldUARD M iLroi.M Banxer, Class of l')Sl, of Fori Worlli, Texas 

7/)'' Daniel Ripley Scholar 

lli:Mn l-'\ \>;s Hcbinson, Class of 1932, of Dallas, Texas 

The .junior Engineering Scholar 

L-i 1,1-: Lero\ P\v\e, Class of 1930, of Louise, Texas 

The Edith Ripley Scholars 

!\Iary Atkinson Delanev, Class of 1930, of Auyleloo, Texjts 
Johnny Fay- Lilly', Class of 1930, of Houston, Texas 
Mildred Estelle Ogg, Class of 1930, of Houston, Texas 

The Mary Parker Giesehe Scholar 

.loiiN Tom Hurt, Class of 1931, of Waco, Texas 

Trareliiig Eelloicship 

Willi \\i liirii\iu> l'iuin;\\ \ii:n, liA.. Mi<e, 192:t, of lloiislon, J'exas 

Trareling Scholarship in Archilectnrc 

Tim i,e |{i>i:ah11ooton, P. Sin \rrliileelure. Rice, 1927; M.V, Rice, 1928, of Houston,Texa 

Honorable Mention jor Traveling Scholarship in Architecture 

William Byron Morgan, B.S. in Vrcliil.'clnre, Bi<c, I92II, of llonsloa, Texas 

Lady (jediles Prize in )( riting 

Henri Kvans Robinson, Class of 1932, of Dallas, Texas 



JUNIOR SCHOLARSHIP LIST — SV/;../,ns II ///; Special Mention 



Iris Isabelle Bailey 
LiLLiE Blake 

Kathebiive Augusta Brooks 
Howard Fletcher Browiv 
Lucille Mildred Davis 
Mary Atkinson Delanev 
Margaret Jeannin Dix 
Edmond King Doak 
Nancy Dl^ncan Forbes 



Diana (tonzalez 
Mary Loliise Goss 
.Iames Henry Healey. .Ir, 
Althea Jones Hill 
Mildred C. Hutciieson 
Carl Illig. Jr. 
Lee Harnie Johnson, Jh. 
Lavoisier Lamar 
Barnes Fletcher L\tiiiui 



Sanders Lvles 
Mildred Estelle Ogg 
Luke Osburn 
Spencer Jerome Scott 
Mary Elizabeth Tisdale 
Margaret Anne Toier 
NoLA Mae Williams 
n \L Davenport Woodward 
\L\HV Elizabeth Wright 



Scholar 



"S 



Mariann Adkins 
Ethel McDonald Barnes 
Dorothy Crew Bethan\ 
Maude Amanda Bryan 
CoRiNNE Crawford 
Mary" Frances Cullom 
Frances Dellheim 



Carl Dodge 

Minnie Etkind 

Francis Alan Fischer 

Al Gray' Forbes 

Lynn Vineyard Foster 

Katherine Elizabeth Griggs 

John Symons Hale. Jr, 



Marguerite Herzik 
Anne Catherine Heyck 
Elenterio de la Garza 
Catherine Audrey Hannon 
Louis Kestenberg 
Rosly'Ne Kuminir 
Grace Lawson 



JUNIOR SCHOLARSHIP LIST— Continued 



Johnny Fay Lilly 
Margaret Marie Long 
Martha Evelyn McGinty 
Sarah McNeill 
Evelyn Elsie Marks 
Pauline Pearl Meadows 



Felide O'Brien 
Abel Brown Pierce, Jr. 
robb y. r.ankin 
Charles Righker 
Julia Hurd Bicker 
Elizabeth H. Smedes 
Ruth Jean Sorbells 



Frances Ione Spence 
Raymond Russer Stone 
James Moore Sturgis 
MiTTiE Sara Tinsley' 
William K. Van Zandt 
Madeline Frances Watts 



SOPHOMORE SCHOLARSHIP LIST — Scholars With Special Mention 



Howard Malcolm Banner 
Ernest Gordon Black 
Reuben Jackson Gallaway 
Elizabeth Goodson 
John Tom Hurt 



Claire Nell Austin 
Charles Melvin Blair 
Maurine Myrtle Brown 
Morgan Skiles Campbell 
Irene May Ciiadwick 
Rabette Friedman 
Joe Z. Garza 
Helen Goldofsky 
Donald Rlake Good 



Henrietta M. Hutcheson 
Maltd Elizabeth Krausnick 
Joseph M. Loewenstein 
Vernon Lee McKinney" 
Hyman Dave Massin 
Thomas Richard Moore 

Scholars 

Alexander Gheentbee 
Fannie Elizabeth Hall 
Samuel Pruitt Herren 
William Samuel Hurwitz 
Earl Orren Johnson 
Walter L. Judd 
Patrick Joseph Keating 

Ed\\ ARD WiSTER McCaRTHY 

BowENA MacLaughliN 



Charles Norvell 
Max Ferdinand Roy 
Rosalie Allen Smith 
Helen Starkey 
Alfred Winterhalter 



Janice Mauriene Marshall 
Violet Madeline Mattson 
Eleanor Derby Quin 
Clara May Smith 
Lewis Edwin Smith 
Sarah Virginia Taylor 
Joseph M. Westheimer 
Adele Wharton 
Arthur Meidling Wittman 



FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIP LIST -Scholars With Special Mention 



Charles Keith Beyette 
Manuel Gordon Bloom 
Ina Helene Boyd 
George Gilbert Di nk 
Sami;el Rhodes Dunlap 
William de la Garza 
Ruth Griffiths 
George Louis Gudenrath 
Arthur Louis Hamilton 



Tod Robinson Adams 

NL\RY MOZELLE AlDIS 

Margaret Evelyn Aller'ion 
Rose Wood Arledge 
Ruby Frances Baktine 
Elizabeth Dale Batt 
BoBERT Charles Bearmann 
Joseph Charles Best 
Alice Blazek 
Ruby Elizabeth Brown 
Alice Martha Buxton 
Martha Holmes Cottingham 
Lenore Durham 
Gwendolyn Helen Dwyer 
Paul Baxtfb Edaionoson 



Marian Frances Harvey 
Aetna Mae Heinson 
Charles Arthur Herbst 
John Hastings Hickev 
Martha Loluse Hickey 
W. Cone Holliman 
Morris Kaplan 
Harold Leroy Kelly' 

Schohirs 

Evelyn Frances Flick 
Helen Adele Forester 
Bernard Freeman 
Dick Hoskins Gregg 
Jo Beth Griffin 
Eleanor Snell Hagemeier 
G. W. Hewitt 
Earl Winfield Howard 
Maurice Edmond Kattman 
Hegar Charles Kriegel 
Alden Lifford Lancaster 
James Everett McAshan 
Thompson Hill McCleary 
Eddins Willard McNealy 



Mildred Helene Kelly'' , 
Carolytv Marcelle King 
Marie Celeste Olivari 
Mary Belle Perkins 
William Whitney Reader 
Henry Evans Robinson 
Mary Alice Stevens 
Catherine Emma Stone 
Margaret Jane Williams 



Marvin Maurice Mickle 
Kenneth Niswanger Mills 
Elizabeth Jean Mitchell 
Marie Nemir 
William Harro Plath 
LiLLiE Evelyn Rienhardt 
John Lawrence Rogers 
Mabel Charlotte Rules 
James Herbert Sawyer, Jr. 
Lewis Allen Smith 
Margaret Madeleine Taylor 
William Craig Wallace 
Bernice E. Williamson 
Dorothy Mary Wilson 
Lois Melissa Wrk;iit 



I'll I BKTA KAPPA 

lil-:r\ CHAPTER OF TEXAS. EST MiUSIIEIi \T THE lUCE f .\STIT['TE (>\ U MK II I. I!i-:i) 

Officers of the Cluipter: 

Stockton Axson President Radoslav Andrea Tsanoff Secrelarv 

Robert G. Caldwell Vice-F^residenl Lester R. Ford Treasurer 

rill' (Jiiipter Semite is eonijuiseil iif llir jiiiir iiffiivrs anil llir jiilliiuini!,: 



Clai i>e W iLi.ivM Heaps 



Stockton Axson 
Harry Lee Bowen 
Hubert Evelyn Bray 
Robert G. Caldwell 
Alexander S. Cleveland 
Griffith Conrad Evans 
Lester R. Ford 



Willi VM \l \rsii Rice, Jr. 

Cliiirltr mill Issiiciale Memlirrs 

William Hartman 
Claude William He\ps 
Floyd Seyward Lear 
Edgar Odell Lovett 
Samuel Glenn McCann 
Alan Dugald McKillop 



II \KI{1 Bo-i ER Vt EISER 



Francis Jay Nock 
Samuel Albert Nock 
Frank Acklen Pattie. Jr. 
William \L\rsh Rice. Jr. 
Arthur Ferdinand Scott 
Radoslav Andrea Tsanoff 

II VRRY BoYER WeISER 



James Addison Baker 



lloniinirv Menihers, Elecleil Manli I. I')29 

Henry Oshorn Twlor ?L\rold Alberi' Wilson 

Miiiihirs-iii-Cinirse, Elirleil Miireli I. I')29 



Maria Ana B\rredi 
Jeanette Gorski 
Alice \Lannig Hovas 
Clare Hibberd Kean 

Charline Estelle Lm.lier Irene Esther Schuppan 



James Erwin McCarthy 
James Calvin McNeill 
W \ldo Forest McNeir 
George P. Montgomery 



Irm\ \I \kg\rei' S<;iu pi'w 
Edwin Joe Shimek 
Mary El\nor Trotter 
Rudolph F. Weichert. Jr. 
Pierce M. Williamson 
Thomas Ogden Wood 



\li'iiilii-rs-iii-Ci)ursi: FJeeleil June 9. 1929 
Eleanor Branch Deborah May Hickey Ida Pritchett South (iEOR(;E II. Rich ii.r 



Menihrr^i-in-Course. Elected Octiiher l'.). 1929 

How.iRD Fletcher Brown Lee Harnie Johnson. Jr. Mildred Estelle Ogg 
Carl Tllig. .Ir. Bvrnes Fletcher Lvtiirop \I\rgaret Anne Toler 

Nola \r\E Williams 



Meniliers-in-Cimrse. Elirlril Ijiril I ', 
Lillie Bigelow Blake Diana Gonzales 



Katherune a. Brooks 
Edmond King Doak 
Nancy Duncan Forbes 



LWOISIER L\MAR 
( illARLES RiCHKER 

Helen Starkey 

ALiRY Elizabeth Wright 



1930 

\\ M. RiCIIVRD l5lill)(;W\TER 

Louise Lenoir 

Flora M( Tver Streetman 

\\ ILEUM JoSIAM TvYLOR 




I ■ I. ' u. 



■p- 





r 


^-^^s 


i^fei ~ lauC>nj£_ 



SENIORS 




■<? ■< 






SE>10ICK. iXAS^ OF l$>30 

OFFICERS 

Cii VKLEs I'uEDEKicK KoYSE Prx'siilcnt 

Edythe Westbrfield J'ice-Presidcnt 

ImiN W. ScHUHMACHEK Sccrcldry-lri'dsiinr 

COMMITTEES 

Executive 

lii sii JoXES Cliiiiniiiin 

Koitiiii lliMES Carl Ilug 

Final Rnll 

Wii.iu i{ Wright. ,Tk Chairiiuin 

Ili.izMiETH John John Yancey 

Hill. Hailey Thomas Lyon 

St'iiiiir Amcricdu 

John C. Ridley' Chairman 

Elizabeth Washburn C. D. Williams 

l{<'lri'sluii<'nts 

M \|{Y Louise Goss Cliaimian 

roiuii-.sr Lee Andrews Anne Heyck 

Dniinilii)ns 

Allen C\ldwell Chainnan 

A. H. Pierce Henry Sanfoud 

K. (). Koss II. Krle Rawlins 



'I'lif I'iilnrcs: RoYSE. Westerfield. Schi hmacher 






^ " 



I'aliiins 

Lynn Foster Cluiiminn 

Gus Cranz Tooley Williamson 

Dorothy Stokes 

lidlKjIKt 

James McKay Lykes CluiiniKin 

TToMI>ISELLE HaDEN MlCHAEL Cl\HK KKMMilCk 

Althea Hill 

C(ii< (iiiil (idiin 

(Jk vhvm Boom-: Chainmin 

Mary Elizabeth '1'isuale Louis S. Smith 

Hugh \\ \>t 

Blnzvr 

Evan Thomas C.liiiirmtiii 

Marion Adkins Hvmlet Davis 

Raymond Ye\t\i\n 

Rcccpliiin 

Aubrey" Calvin Chniniuiii 

Dorothy Bethvny Lili.ixn Horlcx k 

loNE Spence 

Inriltilidn 

Frank Power Ominiuin 

Nancy Forbes Aileen Peckh vm 

KiNCH HlLLYER AlLEN CALm\ ELL 

Paul Smith Chdlniiun 

Mary Hallie Berry Cecil Keith 

William Van Zvndt Guy Webb 



The Pictures: JoNES. Kh)ley. \^'ri(,h I 






1 





lloiisloii 

Candidate for B.A. Degree 

Co-ed Threslier '29. '30, Bus. Mf^r. 
":U): 0. W. L. S. '29, '30, Treas. ''M): 
r.liiiirmau Dance Com. '29; Cranmei- 
Club ■2T-"30. 



ClIARLKS JoSEl'IC AlEO, Jr. 

Houston 

Candidale for B.A. Degree 

Freshman Baseball '23; Baseball '28, 
"29; Spanish Club '26; Football Pro- 
i;iani '29. 



Sam Alfano 
Houston 

Candidale for B.S. in Ch. E. 



Forrest Lee Andrews 
I louston 

Canilidale for B.A. Degree 

Pie-Law Association '29, '30; OoU' 
Team '28-'30, Captain '30. 



\\ 1 1,1, 1 AM Fr]-:ncii Arnold 
Henderson 

Candidale for B.A. Degree 



Sarah Katiiryn Arrvints 
Houslon 

Candidale for B.A. Degree 

P. A. L. S. '26-30. President '29; May 
Fele '25, '26. 




r* 


V^ 


^ 


B^^^^l 1 




'1 ^^ ^"^ ■ 


4 


As^' 


1 


ily^k 




'R 




I I K C.\i A\ ANT 

Mi;inii, Floridii 
I :<,mli,l(ilr for B.A. Deijrc 



llr UNMtli Vl.EXANDER AXELRAD 
IImhsIoii 

iMiiilitliile fw BS. ill Ch. E. 





.! \ K I \ \ 11 l\OD 
lh>llsl..ll 

Caniliiliilr /.«■ B.A. De, 



\\ ii.ii\M Sirvm liAlLEV 

llnilsloTi 
( uniliilair Jiir B I. Ih'ijn;' 



l'j.[.\ M\n(;Ani-:i l'ih<Ki-:i; 

II.MIsh.H 

iliiiiiliiliile fill- B.A. Ihfircc 
v.. B. L. S. 'll-'M. 



ls\BKE Becker 
B.n']ili;ini 

Ciimlutiilr fui B. 1. Diijii 





I ^%.^l 



■k-.\ . <E » U 1 ■] V A J J, 






.' ' If L-' 





Li.Mi i-M, SnuM \< iii:it Benbury 

Ilnu^ln|, 

CurulifUtk' for B.S. in (111. E. 

Ens's Society 'id. '2'). '.iO; Miir 
f'llcni l-'.ll.i;';; l)c|il lilll I'.i.iiiiia 
l-^ri;:MiiTi in;; Siiuw. 



M \i( <M,M I>(iiuii-;n Bknnett 

i:<inili:liile for B A Deijrec 

.liinliii Tliroslicr 'l^i: Cross Country 
l!!',, -l'): Tnirk '27, '30; Senior 
Tlirvslicr ':',l). 



\i \in M \ 1 I H I'l.Hiu 

llollSlOll 

i:,in,liilulc for H..1. l)<-gree 

lli.M.i(.)i.illAss'n.'29.':50:Threslier'2'l, 
■:',ii: Socii'ty Ed. '30; Vice-Pres. Frcsli- 
i[i;in Class '27; Senior Ring Com, ''.'At: 
.liitiiur' Prom Committee '29: Dru- 
lu.iii.' Club '2«-'30; May Fele '27- 
•:',ll; Clrr Chil, ■27-'2t); Bus. Mgr. Co- 
I'll 'rlinslier '2'>; \\ Oman's ('uinnil 

'2:;. ■:',(!: o. w . I,, s ■27-':'>ii. 



.los|. I'MIM.. P. I-.UIO \1 \N 

lloijslon 
I'.aiiiliiUilr Uir H \ Diyrrr 

\i. Iiilrclnral So.i.-ly ■2!i-':'.ll; (I. W 
I, S 'i'l. ■:',(l; (iler Cliil) '2«. 



I )(ii(iii in Cmiw 111, in \N^ 

Moulin,, 

<:ii,iili,li,l,- for H. 1. Dnirec 

<) W , L, S. '27-':',ll, Presidenl ':i(l: 
\l:i\ l-'i'le ■2t!-':i(l, Si^nior Hcr,-|ili,.Tl 
( ,..iiiniill,'e '311. 



1''u\m;e.s Emm V 1^>i.\(;k 

llonslon 
Cuolohilr for II 1 n.iiree 

1 W C \. '27 ■:!(>; CK'e Cluli '27- 

■:'.lt: I r-relit;ioiis Council '2K-':!(1: 

Mclliiiilisl Sluilciil Si'cn-larv ".'A). 






LiLl.IK BlvKE 

Floresvillt* 

( At nd if hi If for B.A. Degree 

(), \V. L. S. 'J8-":HI, Vio.'-Prcs. 'M): 
Tennis Club ''21; M:iy F.lr "2"). "M): 
Phi Beta Kappa. 



Lenore Bland 
Houston 

Oinilliliile for B.A. Degree 





■\Iaude Bryan liEONUEAi" 
Housluii 

Cmuliduie fur B.A. Degree 

Tennis Club "^T-'liO: Y. W. C. A. 'l^T 
■30. 



Kf.rbert Bernard Bollerass 
?Iouslon 

Cauil'nhile fur ii.A. Degree 

\\ and Quill Assuriiilion "liO. '30: Pre- 
T^aw Soeiety "2'J, iiO: News Editor 
Tlirrsh.T "M). 





^EJ 


■ 


' ^ mm 




v^. ' 






1 




i 












f 


^'"W^^""""'^^^^^* 






J. 










M \ H-i III,!/. \ni. I II I'ltiMNi: 
Houston 

Camlkhite jiir B.A. Degree 

V. \V. r.\. '2:-":iO: Terniis Club "^K- 



MaRJORIB AdEI.E BoiiRNE 

Houston 

(.ktiididitlr far B.A. Degree 

Tennis Club Sc.irlaiy 'M): Tlnesher 
■28-"3(): n and (hiill '2^, 




i 






L\ Dki.i.i, lli.wi Ml-: Bb.vndt 

llcillSldll 

Ciiniliiliilr for H. I. Deriree 



l\ \i iini ^ V. HnisBiM-: 

II. ...si, .11 

i:„niliiliili- fnr 71,1. I/ri, 



K \'iiii:niM-: Ai (;t.sta Brooks 

TlMHllC 

(„,„/„/„/,. f,,r li 1. I>,(,nv 



ll..l^ 
II. 


M.i. |- 
iisL.n 


11. Ml 11 BllO^^ N 


( .,;,./ 


,./„/,/, 


.( K 


1 . UtUJICP 


Pill 1 


'.il.i K 


iippi 


; Campauilc '29, '30. 


Assis 


lalll E 


liloi 


'29. Editor '30; Dra- 


Miali 


■ Clul 


1 '28-'30, President '29; 


II. 111. 


.nil.li- M™ 


ion for Graham Bak- 


vr SI 


U.lcillS 


liip 


28; Pre Law Associa- 


lion 


:il): R 


and Quill Association '29, 


:!(); 


riiiiiM 


ns 


28, '29; Candidate I'oj 


nil... 


.•s S.'li 


.lars 


lip '29. 


,l..ll^ 


Bkn.1 


Ml\ 


I'.IU.UN 








(:,/;,,/ 


„l„lr 1, 


. />■ 


1 /),',;,,',' 


\r. li 


l.-.llH 


,1 s. 


•i.'l> '2T-'30. 


Si.i.l 


N Mm. 


\ ('. M.iiw i-:ll 


11. 


llsl.UI 






r ■../„; 


l,l„l,- 1. 


/ /; 


1 Degree 


\r. h 


l.-.llll. 


1 s. 


I'i.'ly '27-'30; Senior 


Kin.il 


I'.i.ll 


c. 


laimiaii Decoration 


C.iii 


Mill.'.' 


':iii 







fi % "1 (1 : r 



., .*■=» 'B' 






I J.\ 1^ \l bUbV CaL\ IN 
I loUSlOIl 

Ciiiiliiliilr for B\. Difiree 

I'iMilbiill '29; Pii-s. Fri'slimnii Chiss 
'J7-, Busiat'SS Mgr. Diiuiialii- ('.liilt 
iid; Invitation Coinniittet* '3t). 



I >i iti .1.1. M 11,1.1.11 t - \uurii i-:r.s 

llnvisloil 

(:,t:t,l„l,il,' fur II A l>r,,n-r 

Vssuciati- Kdilor C-ariipimiK' iJI): 
Hire Band '27-':!ll; nranialic l'.lui> 
'■2H. '2'): Pr.'-law Sss'ii. '2«-':!(K Scr- 
i.-larv and 'I'rcasni rr '2'l: I! \ (hiill 
AssiKJation '30. 



.1 \M|.;s \ I^CENl (■..MUUILI,. Jr. 

r.iriiliani 
( Hiuliihilr f„r H I, Drqrrr 
lias.'l>all ■2ii-':ll); It, \sso.iali 

':'.i). 



\ \ \ 1)1 UN \1U) t ' \--l . .1 U 
ll,,llSh.ll 

lMt„li,lulrJnr H.S_ in E.E. 

I'aiiiiniM'rin;; Soi-icty '27-'i'>0; V. S M. 
I' ■■',11 



.1 1 1,1 \ l^ii.j.^KN Ciiuis r:\iAN 
W.-lsh, Louisiana 

(„ll,liilillr for H I. Ilriirrr 

( ;!,■,■ ciul. ■:;(!■, ■! w i:, \. -?m. 



Vi r.i-;RT Irvixh Cr. \rk 
' iaivcston 

i:,,,iili,liil,- for H. I, /)(■(//■,■,■ 

Prc-Mrd Society '2K-':ill, 







ELlZABiri'll iNlscKt-.l ('.1,\HK 

Houston 
(:<tiiiliiliilr for H. \. I>f<inv 
■rciiiiis Cliih '?M. 



M IMS W \VM.: r.l.AHK 
lios.-nhcli: 

CiiNihil,,!,' f„r />'. I /).■,,,■, 





\ I l;i lu .1 \\l t.s C.Lli(;s-i<j.N 
W.Uli, Louisiana 

Clindiiliih- far 11 I />r,,/i'C 

Rand 'JT-'-id; Slump 'l':, Uli. 



I I MUll.l) .1 laUlM I, ( '.IIH N. ,1 II. 
Ilousloll 

Ciuiiluliilr (iir /)' \, /)(■(;/■(■(• 

(loll I'.aui '-ll-'-liK 





Mil uiu l> l-a 1/ \i;i I II ( '.ol.j 

II.HIsh.ll 



\\ INsjON |)l M \p CoNNIvLL 

llnnsl,,,! 

Clllilliluir lor />' I. Ih;i,rc 

r.aiul r.--.'M: \i.'.-l'ivs;.lrul •:!ii. 




i/riT 




Mabian iVda Cooke 
Housion 

(Uiiiiliildle for Fi.A. Degree 

E. B. L. S. "27-"3(). Secrelary "?0. 



Robert M. Cooper 
Olncy 

Cundulalefor B.S. in Ch. E. 

Enii'g Socit'Ly; R;illy Cluli '2' 





Marte Elizabeth Couoiilin 
Ho as ton 

Candidate for B. \. ih-gree 

(). W. L. S. '-Z'-'M): Frriirli Chil. "2<J; 

Clcr Clul) '?,{), 



(ii srw l^i>\n M) CRA>iZ, Jr. 

I'orl WOrlli 

(.'.(iiididale for B.A. Degree 

Bally Club •2T-"30; Freslii. un. Cluci 
LeufU'r '26; Varsity Clieer Lcarlcr "27- 
"20; Honor Council '27; Decora I ion 
Coinmitlee Junior Prom "29; Palioas 
Committee Senior Class '30. 



CORINNE CrAWI-'ORD 

Houston 

Cuitdidale far B.A. Degree 

ArchiLeclural Society '28-"30; Dr. 
niatic Club '28-'30, Treasurer ":U). 



Wynne Louis Cheekmore 
Houston 

Cfindidiilr for B. \. Degree 






W iNNiK Davis Crisp 
I lousUm 

<:„n<li'l(iU' for B. \. I><'(irei' 



Mauv Kh VINCES Cl'LLOM 

Houslon 

Ctiiultildir for B.s'i. Degree 

\. W. C. A. ■27-'30, Prtfsidpnl "M): 
Special Axson Club Scholar '29-'30: 
CuiTi'iiL Literature Club Cup for BesI 
Ml \iuuTi(l (lirl '30. 






lloWELL HOIIMANN CuNYUS 
LoHiivicW 

UiiuUdulc for B.A. Degree 



Elizabeth Ci'BSOn 
Houston 

< Aindiditle for H. \. Degree 

\ . W. C. A. '27-'30; Spanish CUil) "^H; 
inter-Reliaious Council "30. 



Houslon 

(Uiutlulnle f>r B.A- Degree 

Tumhliui,' Team "26-"2H: Pre-Law As 
sncialion "27-'30. 



Hamlet 1. Dams, Jr. 
Galveston 

Cn/i'liildle for B.A. Degree 

Cranmer Club ■26-"30: Pre-Mcd So- 
ciety '26-'30: Intramural Director 
'29; Senior Blazer Commit lee '30; 
Rice Nisht "20. 







.Mii,i>hu:u LlclLLE Davis 
Housloii 

Cundiikdr I'm- B.A. Drijrce 

Glee Club ■28-'30; Mathenuilics As- 
sistant '28-'30; Thresher '28-':l(l; 
Tennis Club 'SB-'SO: May Fete Prin- 
cess '30. 



AlAin ArkiNSON Delan'EV 
\n.i;lrliin 

Uandidute fur B.A. Degree 

Crannier Club '2T-'3t), Secrelnry '2'!: 
I-Milli Itiplry Scholar "311. 



Grace Mary Deeeinc.er 
Taylur 

Cindidide fur B..\. Derirer 

(>. W . 1.. S. ■2a-'3(). 



LiLLlE \'e \l Dew 
llouslon 




r.iuididdle for B.A. Degree 





Va.\)\ Trvnces DiEDERn::H 
Ib.usloH 

i:iindidiile for B.A. Degree 

Thresher ■27, "28; Y. \V. C. A. 
'30. 



EnMO.XD KiNn Do\K 
Taylur 

(.'.urididule for B.A. Degree 

I'lii Lambda Upsilon; Phi Bcia Kappi 




..1 '■ 



— '"T 





V" m 




(Mi„ll,lalr f„r US. in K. E. 
I'^ii^iiicci iii^i Sucii'ly 'Jft-'.'iO. 



lieu 1 SillMi 1)1, vkl 
W ill. Ii, -sin- 

C.inilnliil,' f„r II 1 I ),yrcr 

W liliiii; r.liil,, liihriMlioiiiil Discus- 
si. Ill (;i..ii|i. ( '.liiiiniiaii '29, "30: '■R" 
and Quill Ass'u; Dramatic Club; 
Tlircslicr. News Edilor '29, Associalc 
l':.i;i.>r '•:.»: I':.lil.ii- S.^ni.ir Tluvsli.T 



!■ It \M 1>- .l.lSl I'lKM-, Ki; \N 

II.Hlsl.in 
Cuiiiliilalr fur IS I. Ihyire 



\ 1 11. . I M \ II i-:s'ri-:R IvMiatsoiN 
M..USI..I1 

( ,iN,li,l,ilr („r Ii. \. Driirn' 



M 1 NMl Ivi MM) 
ll.illsl..ll 

I „,„li,l„l,' fi.r II I nr,in-f 

Shiiri. S.lioi.H in Civi.s ;.ii.l I'hihi;- 
llii..|i\ ':'■(): ( liii.l.-i in S...ii)l.i-> ■:',(). 



\ iiliM \^ \\ 11 I 1 \M I" VIST 
II. ills 

(■„,„;„/„/,. /■,„■ /j.,s ,„ (.7,. E. 

I'lcshiuau ( '.Liss (:.>iiiili\ '2<>: I'.aiiil 

"-"1. ■:;«; l-;ii,i:i liu^ s..,i.-i\ 'i::-':'.!!. h 





I 



•^ ''■"' r* '"'"' 



I 




ilRvri-: Hawkins I'"i;i,1)kr 

lloiisldll 

( innliilali- fur R. \. Dcfjire 

I'il'iilIi Cliil) "iT-liO; Wriliiiy «"luli ''I't. 
'30; ThresluT '27. 'i'*. ':)(); GI,t Cliil. 
■28: Y. W. C. A. '27. 



1 ,111 isi: Ivi in-:i, I""i-;lder 

lloilslnil 

Cin.liiliib- fur H.A. Dccirrr 

"I W C- \. '27-'2<l: Prr-Mcl S... I.l> 
■211-':l(l; ( :iiU' I ;lrr ('.lull '2'l. 'M\. 



1 JA\ VHD El'fJKNK FkRRIN', .1r. 

I Itiusloii 
Cuitlulolr („r IS S. in E. E. 
luiir'IHM'litl;; Sncicty '27-'ol>. 



BrRxvinM: l">i"nr\n k Fifth 
II. MI. Ion 

( „mli,lulr fur IS \. Ih.im- 






(IIHN S, l'l\. Ill II 
UniiNion 

Ciuiiliiliilr for IS \. Ilr,iree 

iMltlillcrniii; S...i.-ly ■27-':10. 



.1 \ M KS ( i R A II \ M I- 1.1 > X 

I limsLoii 
r.„mU,lulr for IS 1. Drgree 





\\M -I |)l M\N I'\)RBE:^ 



Cdiiiliclnli' f,ir H \ Dfi/rrr 

I'. A. L. S. I'T-':'.!!. S.ricliirx ■;'!. 
Pivsirlc'ill ':',«; I )i :iiii;i I ic Cliil): Caiii- 
patiil.- 'iT-'i'l. 



Lynn ViNinAuu FostI'IR 

lloiislnn 
(„,„/„/„/,■ ;'.,/■ « I, Ihiirn- 

iv II L. s, '■2:-':w. I'lTsiiii'iii 'iui, 

I '.iKlinii:!!! (.r Sl-lli.M I'.rlK.n's Clllll- 
rililh-c". I',I\ r ( :lul.; \l:i\ l'".-lr 'llT: 







.loiiN II i,nHi-,nr ( i \(;i-; 
Dallas 

Ciiiiilidiili- for />. I, Ih'iim' 

Hiilly (Jul. "Id: Mire l>iv-l,;i 
linlii.ii 'I'K ':,» 



ls\ \(' ( I \ nniri'i 

Wiiilllo,, 

Cuullilalr I, If /)■ I Ih-iiirr 

lltli'iMlalidniil I )is(iissiiiM (lioiip '2}!- 
■30; Thrcslicr 'I'T. l-lx.haimr Ivlihir 
'2'), \ssorialc IC.Iilni ■.111, |-",(li lor .1 uil- 
i.ii Tliirsli.r 'L"l; M and ()uill \ssci- 
.ialiuri 'ill-:'.!!; Wiilijii: C.lvlli '2I1-:!II. 



\()HM\N Sii:ni.i\i; (Jausi 

lloiJslnii 
(:,i,„ll,l,il,- f,„- IS \ llr,,rn- 



I )l \\ \ ( ln\/ \l,|.;/, 
II.Misli.a 

CiNilHlalr f„r I! \ llr.in;- 

Spanisli Cliil. ■l'T-':;(). I'lvsiilrnl "2)1. 
\ I. ,-l'ivs ■:',»; \ss'l, ill Spallisli '27- 
':;iK I'ln r.rl;, k; a. 





5 f ' p : i' 



^ ^ r ^ ^ MM r HM'^ Bl T r 



'"!] 





M \ in LoL isE Goss 
I Inuslon 

Cuiiliih,!,- (i<r B. \. I)ri,m- 

I-: li. I,, s. 'i:-:'.!). \ i.i-i'n's. ■:■,(): 

\l:iN l-".-h- '2K: II. linll I'T. 'I'll. 



Zi:itll,i) \ L(»i ISI-: < in \M 
Houston 

(:,,,i,li,lule for B.A. Ih-ijm- 

n. \V. L. S. ■28-':!l);Ma\- Kclc '1^). 



M \m; \Hr.i Til i.KN (^ukaoy 

llousloi, 




Cuiiliilalf for B A . Ili 



■ijrr 



fili'i'Club 'I'-'-l'-t: DiMM.iiii. C.liil, i"!. 
':!n; Thresh.-r 'ili, 'I'l: lii.,- \l,ll„,- 
.lisl Couriril S,-.T.-lary ':W: May Krli- 

"I'K, ':■,» 



.losij'll l|\HRI.s ( iui-.l-.NW OOO 
I loilSlOIl 

Cuiiiliilulr for H. 1. Ih'firrr 
(loir Team 'iH-iid. Caph.iii l"! 



llouslon 

luiiitidulefor R^S^ in Ch. K. 

IImi.oi- Boll '27. •l'I!-. iMiiiii.ri'rinK S,)- 
n.-ly '24. Enj<ini>f|-inK Sliow '211. ':i(l; 
Band '27-'30: Librarian 'M 



k\ll[FBl.%E I'^Ll/ Mil I II (Inna; 
( Iranire 



(oiidiilale for B. 1. I In, 




i 





1 liiMoi.sKi.LK Carolyn Haden 

Cidiiliihilr for I! 1. /),■(//■«■ 

Miiilciil C.Diiiic II 'J!i. \ li..-1'i.s. ':',(!: 
Ciiiiiiiiri CJuh '27; P. \ L, S '27-:lO, 
ll.'li.iricr -2'). Sciri'liiiy ':',(l; lM:i\ 
r.l.- '27-'30, Duchess '29, Queen 'lid; 
> \V, r. A. '27; Cainpiinile '27. ':',ll. 
\ss.i. Iiil,- |.;rlil<>r ':',ll; II and Oiiill \s- 
M"Mili,.ii '27.':!(l. 



• Ion N Si M(^^^ II \ 1.1-,, .1 n 

S|,,irlaiiliiM:;, Si.ulh Carcilin;! 

i:,ni,li,lalr for IS S. in C /-J, 

Slii.lciil r.ri.iic li \, S C. F.; Mariiiu.- 
I i\il laiiiiririis' I l.|,l, iiT Kii;;iiii( riiij 

Show ':i(i 



r \riM':itlNB AlilJHK^ II,\NNON 

I Inuslon 

Ciiniliilair f„r li. 1 /),',;rrr 

Tennis ('.lull '2H-":i(); Tlni'sli.i '2«- 
':'.(); niiiinalie Club ','!(1; WriliiiK <'lul> 
':!». 



M Mu,i mu'iE Undine 11i-;r/.ik 

llullsloTl 




Caiiilul.ilr f„r H 1 nrijiee 





\l II iiiti II Vi: \iu. Ht^yne 

ll..nsl<>n 
( uiulnlalr f„r H. I Ihqii-e 



\iiiii> ,l(.M.s Una. 

lldlJSlOTl 

Ciiiiliiluir f,,r />'. 1. nn,m- 

Surirls |.;,lil,.r -niivsli.a' ':',(), li an. I 
I )ilill Ssso. ialicii '2<), ■:',(!; ^ . W . C 
\ '2'!; CliM' Cliil. '27; Hiulo^y (Ira.ler 
'.W: Drainalii Club 'iiO; l!i<e Mh' 
'27, '2'*; \(l\ cilising Ass'l (anipa- 

iiilc ':!(!. 




I 







1 




■- 


v/ 1 




1 


^^ 


,^/ I 


^^ 


k r w 


HHH 


■L^Bl^ 






%^'' "wl^^l 


^^^^^^^^^HHHk 




;„..,_JIM 




K 1 M II III l,l,V(-:n, .1 n. 
Iloiisloii 

C.innlulalr fur />', 1 Di'i/irr 

Sc'iiHii liivihilli.il (•.(.iiiniillce '30. 



I 'ii iiti It r 1 1 [MKs 

Mi.iil.rn y. Mexico 

( ,n„h,l,ll,' ini Ii I IliiinV 

I;;iIIn riiil. '2'). ■:!!). Kxccutivc Coun- 
. il ol lliilly ('.lull ':i(l; Senior Exeeu- 
li\e ('.omiiiillee-, I'.iisiiiess Miinnger 
onile'riliv^ller ':io. 



I il I X I! I 111 lloiicsox 
llolislnii 

( .ni.liilulr fur I', S iil 1/. E. 

Isiiiiilieeiiiii; SoeieU "iT-'iid: \. S. M. 
i;. "iT-'iMl, CliHiriiiiin ':)0: MiiniiKer 
M. IC. Depl. ol' EilKilieeriiig Show '30. 



.li 111 N ( ii i,i,i;seli-, I liil.l,\Mi 
.111, k^oiiville 

CaiHll.laIr 11 S in C. E. 

\ S C, 10. 27-':!ll. I'lesiileiil 'Ji). 



M\Hli\l!i:i JMI/M'.I 111 lllMlkS 

lloiislon 
( ,uiil„U,U- Inr It I /),■,;/•(■(• 



I .1 I I I \ X lOl 1/ \ 111 111 I loltll 11 K 
lloUNloll 

i .ui.llilnir f„r H I I Irilirr . 

Ill lie C.liili '27, 'I'll: Cniiiiiier 

Clul. 'l'T '.'.ll; II \V. L- S. '27-'3H'. W o- 
iiiiiirs Council 'JT-'3II, President ':'.!>: 
^ \\ . ( . \ 'JT-'SO; Secrelary ol' 
lOpiseopiil Sliiiieiil Council '28, Presi- 
(leiil '2'); Maid ill May Fete '28, •2<). 
I'liiicess '30; Hd'cplion Connuittee of 
Senior Class; Senior Meniher of Honor 
Council: Princess lo Dallas Fair '29. 





jS ■< T- 





Elizabeth Hotciikiss 
Houslon 

Cii, iiliiltilr f<,r li- \, Ih'iirri' 



Nick Ki>\\ \nn 1 1 ^ i>i 

Poll \llllUT 

Cdiulidiilf for li. 1, ll.'iim' 
iM.olhiill '2h-'-2K: llnll Ci.ininill, 



( ' \iu I Luii. .1 n. 

Iloiisluii 
t'.iUHl'uhttv fof H.\. flnf/ff 

I'lii Beta K-.unm: H.mioimI.I.' Mciilioi, 
iVir Griiluiiii Bakcl' Slufii'lll.siii|>'2''; 
Coir Team "2K-':!0; •W" Assorialimi 
'DM; Honor ('.(jiituil ''Mi. (a-ariiihi 
Club '2K-':!1I. Pifsidrlll 'i'l. I'lT-I.MM 
Association "28-';'.(): SUiiiip r.luh ' li',. 
'29; R and Quill Associaliou '2'K ':',(l; 
Junior Prom ( '.onniiil hi' l"*: Sitiiur 
Execulivf Coniinill.r '.;t): ( '.aii.liihilr 
Hliodrs Silioiar 'I'M. 



Ill: \-i i^ici-; Loiii.si', .Ian i/.EN 

llduslon 
CamliiUilr fur B, I- /).■<,;■,■<• 

Cranm.-i' r.lul. 'l'T -lid; "l W . C. A. 
Inl.T-li.-liiiious Council ".'M. 



Lhi:: Hahmi-: Johnson. .In. 

Hal linycn 
l\,,uli,l;lr r„r li I n.-iin-i- 

rin l;,.|;, Kappa; Ciahaiu I'.ak.'i 
Scholar '2'): I lolu-nl lial Scholar 'Ml: 
Malh Sssislanl 'iJ'l--:',!): Shi.lcnl 
Council '2'-)-. Kuf;iuc><'rin^ Socicl> J'l. 
".U\: \. S. C. K. "28. '2^>-. Ensinciaiur 
Edilor or Thresher 'L^'t: News Mana- 
ixcr I'aiirinccriii^ Show ':\U 



Pu sn .Ion r;s. .1 n, 

l>allas 
r„,i,li,l„lr fur H I nn;n-r 

1-oolliall '2'''2'), ChairiualL Jlono 
Couiu-il 'lid. 






I 




LiLLIK LOI'ISE IvA'i.'^EH 

Conroe 

( ',iii,li,l,il,' fur I! \ l)i-<irei- 



( '.i;i 11, SiKiw M \N l\ i.i 1 n 
llmistoii 

Cimlidule for BA. De<ire 



I'.iisi'liall 'iS-'Sd. Caplain 'M: I'^i^k. I 
l'.:ill '28. '29; Senior Ririf; ( '.omiiiil Irr; 
■ It" Association '28-":iO. 









( in \ir \M Kendvle 
Dallas 

Cuiiiliiliilr for HA. Ilfijrec 

r.iaiiiiiii ('.lull 'i()-':'.ll; II. HI.. I H 



Mn:ii\i'.L Clark Ki:m>hi( I\ 
Iloiisloii 

Ciniiliihilr fur B. I. />■</(■.■(■ 

r.ask.'l Ball '2T-'2<J. Caplairi '2<>: 

Hall C.iinmill.'.' 'i'K Chain i .il' 

Hall Comniillf.. 'ill: Ma. I. ail Maiia- 

KiT of Basket Ball ':'.(i 



I... I IS l\t:sTi:\BLH.; 
I louslon 

Ijiiiilhlalr fi,r B. \ llrijiri- 

I l.irlli.' V.-fill ■:'.(!; iiil. Iliali..ilal I )i? 
.iissi.m ( irinip Mo. 



\\ iiaa AM Dl H^KLL K iuki' a i lu. k 
Houston 

Ciiiidulule (or B^S. in Clu E. 




I*! 





I" I III I .h I.KS Iv(»r,IILER 
lloiislilll 

CiikIiiIiiIi- j\,r HA- llrijm- 

r.-linis C.llll. •JH-':!!!. \ iir-l'li'sklcnl 

■_"); ^ . W . C. \. '27, llK. 



\ I I :\ IS S, Koi rwTrz 



Caiulul,,!,- fur B 1. Ih;iic 



K\ l';l,Y^ !\1 \nir, l\i iin 






llnush 



CiiiHlnlalr f„r H- I /).■,,/<• 



I II '^1 ■! m: I\ vMiNin 
Holis 

Cuiiliilul,' Jni li i. I>,;im' 



I, w iiisi 1 II L \\i \ n 

Silll \ill..Mi(. 

I miili.liilr f,,r H- I. Ilnirrr 

\liilli \ssisl:iLil 'JT: W illiiiKl'.liili '2<i- 
':;(!. ricsiilnil '?A). 



> I I \r. I 1 .1 I I, I . \ MKIN 
I'oil WmiIIi 

(uiuhihilr l„r li I. Il,;,m- 

\\" \sM.. iiili.iii: 'I'liirU 'L!li-';',(l; Shi- 
il.iil Cc.uii.il 'I'll, l!'!; D^iiiit Coili- 
iiiillr,' I'l!, 'J'); ( :iiMiriii,iii liliizrr 
I :..iiiiiiinr,' Ll'i; I! iiihI (,)iiill Associa- 
linii, shiil.iil \ssisl;iiil Ma Ihemalics 
_'7. '_'ll: l; \. '2'l, •:',()■, Campanili' 
Shiir '2'l, ':ll): Siiililur SliiiliTlls' Piih- 
li(:ili.iiis ':',(!: Spi.iis lOiiilnr Senior 
■I'liivsli.-i '?M. 





P)Ahm:s Fi.i;i<:iii:n Lmiihdi' 
Ivisl L:is VcKiis, ^(■\v \lr\ic.o 

CaiHliiluIr fnr H \. Ilniree 

I'hi l'.rl;i Kii|. pa; (Iraham Baker Slu- 
tliiii ■2'*-"i;(): I'ifshinaii Cross Coiiii- 
hv Ho. 



Cine I. M Ml. am l.\n>i)\- 
Wrlsh. Luaisialla 

( .niilidal, Ini H I hnin;- 

V W. C. \. '2'!. '-.W: \l.lli>.;lisl Couii 
. il 'ili-'iill. 





( il i.Miat I la:it<n Li-: \t]t 
II0USI..11 

i:,ui,h,l,ilr lor US. hi C.li. /•;. 

I' hall ■_"). 



.hi. ..Ml Mm.., I I, l.i.vv 
ll..iisl.ai 

( '.iluliihih' f,,r It I, /),■.,/■,•(' 





.l.aiNM ^^^ lail.l 
ll...i>.li.n 

( ,iiiil,,l„lr f,,r n I /),■,„■,■,' 

II. .11.11 li..ll '2:-'2'i: I'JIilh Ki|il._-> 
S.li..lar 'l!<l-':'.ll 



K \ I 1 1: ( !l, M.'. s fjOOf'.lNS 
II..IISI..II 



Imiiliihili- fnr I! \. Ilrqriv 





M \ln; \ui r M \iui, L(i>;(;; 
ll..n>l..n 

<:,in,ll,lal,' !„r II. I. I li'iirir 

'I'liiiiis Cliih L'T-':!!): Cranmer Clul) 
'■2:--M]: CArr (,liil,"2T-'3(): Y. W. C. A. 
'■2'l: liil.i-llclii;i..ns Cnuiliil '20. ':>,» 



I K\ IN M \ M I.I, Li nil-, 

li,.iisl..n 

iMitdnlalrJur II. A. IJ.yir 






S \Mn:ns L-i i.i;s 

C.r ' 

( uiulhlulr In, II \. Ilajire 

ll..||ri,lli:,l S.lH.hir -iK-'SO; Biolo^V 
\ss1sI;l1iI _'i!-':',(l; Mnlll \ssislaill '27- 

'-"1; ^ M. C, \. '2:-:10; V,. s. u. 
I '..uii.il '_';;-':',ii. 



'I'lloM \s PiNKNKV LYO^' 

<:„,i,li,l,ilr f,,r li 1 l)i;,,m' 

l'r.-M..I. Su.i.U; MaiuLgcr of Co 

..|. ■:;ii. 



\l MINI \ \'.\ 1,1^ N M. ( llMY 

II.Hisl..n 
i:,i,i,li,l,il,- fnr II {. n,;,m' 



Sm.mi M. Ni 11,1. 
l',ra/...riM 

i:,i,i,l„lal,- fnr IS \ Driirr 





^ ^ ^ 



I 



?! 



^"^ -? 




EvKi.YN Elsii-; M arrs 

SMllla Mdiii.-n, {:^ilir.)liii;l 
I'.aniliil,,!- U,r H. \ Itninr 

Mii\ I'.. I.' 'I'll. •;>,(); il,,ii(ir II. .11 '_•:. 

J'); CI.-.. C.kil) '■r,--?M, 'r,iiiil>i Cliil. 
M): iMi-iiili CIlil. '29, 



ll..iisl<.n 
Ciiniliiliilr fur I! I llnin 





I > \% M i:m.i 1,1.. .1 H. 

Il..lislll|| 

Cuiili.liil,' far US ni C. E. 

\. S. C- !•:. '-Ih-'M). Vice-Pn-si.l.nl 
Sprint -Jil. Pr,.^i,|,-iil l-';ill ■."!; K,i^,- 

llriM S...icl> ■.'(.-'i'.ll. I'.an.|ii.'l 

i;..Milliill.-.- 'I'll. \ i... I'l.si.l.ril |-;ill 
'iH); |{.|lly C.Uili "'.(I; riiilll. Mann;;.'! 
I'-nj^iiiccriiii; Sln)\\- ';iO. 



^U^: EsTi:.,!,,.; !\1|. 



(:„luli,l„lr Inr H 1 llnirr 





( ', \ 1 II I III M'. h!ll/\lll Jll \1 I 1. M ICLL 

II..IISI.1II 

Ciunllilah' fur H. I Dn/rrr 

\. W. C. \. '^h-'-lS: Cnuiiiu-i (l.ili 
■J()-':'.(l. \ ii.--l'r.'si.l..iil ■:■.»; Cirls Gl.'.> 
C.liil. llh -I'll. 



I'. \ ^ \n.Mi I 1 1 .:il M.nns 

II..IISI.III 

i:,iii,liiliil- fnr H \ l>M,riv 
l'l.-_M.ll. So,;i.l> 21. '2»- 




i 



' T 



vm mm m 



r^ t. 




■Vniv Busiinell Moreno 
Houston 

( kiDrliihilc for B.A. Degree 



Philip Mokrtll 
ReadQeld, Maine 

Candiilate for B.S. in A/. E. 

A. S. M. E. 





M.\ajoatE Evelyn Nicks 
Housfon 

Candidate for B.A. Degree 

Dramalic Club '28-'30; Gloo Cliili 
■2H: May Fete '27. 



Charles Dallas O'Brtk^j 
Ho us Ion 

Candidaii' for B. A. Di-gree 





Fei.ide Corinne O'Huien 
Houston 

Carnh'datr for B. A. Degree 



Mildred Estelle Ogg 
Houston 

Candidtde for B. A. Degree 

Y. W. C. ,\. '27-';5n. Y. w. c. \. 
Cabinet '29-"30; Glee Club '30; Grad- 
er in Spanish '29; Edith Ripley 
Scholar '29, "30; Honorable Mention 
lor Graham Baker Scholarship '2*) : 
Phi Beta Kappa. 




f? ■ 






Anna Dean Ording 
Houston 

Cdtididah' for B. I. Ih-ijrrr 

Kivnch Cluh "27-':iO, \ icr Prrsiilnii 
French Club 'IHI. 

Frances Auij.li: I'almi.u 

Houston 
< 'itiiiliihde for HA- Dnjrrr 



l.-i 1,1. Llltoi I' \ VNK 

i;i 1'.^ 

lUiinluhtkjor H S_ in M. li. 

Foolball '■21-'2<>: E. B. L. S. Scholiir.- 
ship '26, '27; .luiiior l-'rminiTT iii^j 
Sclmlarship '29; Ur:„\ Waih-i in 
r.OTniiKHis '2Q: Si-riitw MiiiiluT Slit- 
(l.'iil C.iiiricll MO; Shi.lriil \\;iilci '2",- 
'28. 



\iii:k?j ELlz.\BKril 1M:(Kii\m 

INul .\rthur 
CllKllilale !„r H 1. I Irijrrr 

I I W . L. S. '2H-'30; l);iri(c- ( ■.nnimll Iit 
'2'l. Crilic ■Mt: CIim- C.IuI) '27. "21:; 
Snii.ir hu il;ili..iis I 'ciriiriiil !■■.■ ';',(). 

\ lu.i I Wuiw N I'livHi I , .) 11 

r.lrssiiiL- 
( .:,„li,l,il,- for B. 1. /).■./(■<■,■ 

\ivliil.-(hir;il S,Hi,.|\ ; S.iiini !>,■,.., 
iiliiiiis; \nlii-\rls I )<■. oral ions; n«l 
SlalV '24, ':!(!. 

.! , H AY.M(:^.^"D Prns 
llul.hard 

i'uiiduluir (or B.A. l>n,n;- ' 

l!;illy Club '27-':',(l, Sc(rclar\ ^'l. 
\ i< I- President ':'»(). Execiilivr Cdmi- 
iriill.-L' '28-'30; Rice Nile- '24; Husi- 
riiss Manager S<'iiior 'riireshrr '2'»; 
\(.(miitaiil Slurli'iil Piii.li. ;i I ions 27- 
2't; Chairman .Si-niur liin;: ('.ornniil- 
lee '29; R. and ()iiill Assiieia licni '27- 
':',l). President '30; .Vccounlant l''aenl- 
l\ Clul. '27-'20. 







l-:<l[ia 

Ciiiuliilalr fur H 1, Di-iirrr 

I'iioIIimII ^(i-'i'l. 'liiKk '^K; Soplio- 
[iKnc Prrsiilciit "2K; .luiiior Si'frelary 
anil 'ricMsiinT *J*>: ('.liaiirnan Senior 
ln\ ilalioii ( :<>iiiiiiillri' 



Tin iM \^ M \ luo% H \l\H(>l,T 
II.Hi^lua 

Caniliil.ilr fur I! \. I>n,rrr 

\rillilci'llllal Sdcirlv 'L:(i-'2I). 





M vNNi "I 1 I II lUM.iii.r 
IlilllUtlllr 

Cuiifi.l,,!,- fur /■;. 1. Ih.;,r, 



li'.iiit ^1)1 m; ( '. M.liw i.i.l Hankin 
llruwiiwiioil 

( aiululalr fur U.S. in i.li. IC. 

I'.aiiil ■2T-:ill. 





II IjU I lUxM INS 
l.aliraslri 

Caiiiluhilr fur H I. Ihiirrr 

I'lalK I 'lull: \rrliilr.lliral Siii-ifly. 



C.l in M. 
MoiisIm, 



n III iiiiat 



C.nululnir fur I! I Ih-./rre 
IVrsliMlall Silii.lar l.isi 'J 



I'.. S. V 







r.nouoE Thompson Reynolds 

Diilleis 
Candiddir for B.A. Degree 
'I'liiik •27-'2'3; Editor of the Owl ';!(); 
\irliili'chii-a! Society. 



('.ii\RM:S l^ICHKEK 

M»r;uiinoTll 
Ciindidale fur H.S. in CIl E. 
I'lu L;iiill..ia Insil.Hl '-m. -.'M. 



.h I.IA 111 lU) HiCKKn 

MousLou 
C'luuhdaie for B.A. Degree 
(). W. L. S. '150; Drainatic (".liih 
■:'.(); Thresher 'i'). 'M). 



.Iimx C. RinLKi 

WhartOTi 
( '.(uididale for B..A. Degree 
Pie-Law Society '27-'30, Sert^eaii 
al-Arms '28, President 29." :l(l; Ball 
Cluli "24, '?M. Dance Committee '2' 
■.•',(); Stomp C.luh '28, '29, Secret n 
'28; Oaiimer Chdi 'SH; Stiidci 
r.oLulcil Secretary ''M\\ ('.hairilia 
Se[li,)r \niericai. 'Wtt: lioiiur Hull 'J' 
'28, 



Kr:EBTON Skitz Robb 

Hooslori 
Cuiulid.ile for B.S. In ;W, /l. 
(ieucral Manager Sixlli Bicimial E 
^nneering Show '30; President B. S. 1 
"2T-"30; Executive Committee Ral 
Cliih '31); Vice President Engineerii 
Society '28; Secretary-Treasurer \ 
M. E. '29; Intramural Basket IS; 
'2-1, Basket Ball Squad •2-S: Engiuec 
ing Society '2t-':!ll: Slaileiil Coiirii 
'30. 



NOELIE .\nNE HoMEHO 

Houston 
(jindulole for B.A. Degree 
v.. 1!. L. S. ■27-'3ll: Frencli Cluh 
Pi Delta I'iii '30. 









Hollsloll 



Cuiiliilair lor H \- I >ni,Tr 

l'iv-Mi,i, Scicic'iv ■:!». 



lM(M:sr (>si;oui» Koss 
llnusloii 

I ■„„./,./,/(,■ ;,./■ H-S. i,i U E. 

\ S \l Iv '?M. 'IK. I'ul.li.ily \hi,l- 

;if;,'i- ■li\: [li<r liislituLi- Flying Club 
"2'J, \ ii'c IVrsidi'iit; Eriffinoering: So- 
(■i("ty '27-';U), Eii^nneering Society 
Piililicily '■?,{): MaiiaKCT M. E. DepL. 
Eil^iiicoritlii Sliow ";]0; Sciiiijr Deco- 
rations CoMiniillee ":i(l; 1 )Iseilssion 
Cirouji '20. 



('.it\ri.p:s I'"hiiii um k Moysii: 
Dallas 

I ,u„licl,ilr fur US ill Ch. K 

Presid.'Ml i.r the Senior (.'.lass; Shnleril 
( '.onncil '2K, '2''; Dance Connnillee 
20, •:',(!■. HalK (.lull '28-':!0; Secre- 
tary '2y-':UI, Mineral Chairman Hally 
CUib Dance *:l(); .Innior Prom (^oni- 
milti-e '20: Mall ( '.onimil lee. 



\l IM.N Itl I.M 

I'orl \\..illi 



Ciiiiliilulr f,,r H I, Itrqree 



III Nn^ Mow \i(ro\ S\M-onn 
lllplev. Trnla^ss,.,. 

CiiiiiIkIiiI,' fur It. 1, I )r,iree 

Virhileclural Si.cicK; Senior Deco- 
l-alion I '.oiiMuilO'c ';',ll 



M \i!sn M 1 1 on I lei S vNcr^lNET 
h'oil W or 111 



I'll, III III, 1 1.- I„r H S. ill C. E. 
\. S C. ]■: . llalK Cliil,. 






p ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 








John William Schuhmacher 
Illusion 

(.'.(I ihI iridic for B.A. Degree 

Scciftary-Treasurer Senior Class '30; 
Pre-Law Society '28-'30, Vice Presi- 
dent '30: Rally Club ■27-'30; Stump 
Club '27, Vice President '28; Frcsh- 
nian Football '27. 



Spj:ncer Jerome Scott 
Houston 

Candidate for B.A. degree 

Craumer Club '27-'30. PrcsidcnL "28: 
]^ie-La\v Socieiy '2**, '30; Campanile 
'30; Honor Roll '29: Engineeriufi: 
sliow '28, '30; Jurisprudence Assist- 
ant '30; Stump Club '28, '29; R. and 
Ouili Xssociation "30. 



\i.H i: I'hances Seaborn 
H(nislon 

Coinlnlole for B..\. Degree 

W iilmg Club, President "30: Pre 
Med Society, Secretary: Tlircsliei 
1 . ilnre Editor "30. 



Liii\x Allen Siieblull 
Houston 

Caiididair for B.A. Degree 





Samuel Morris Slack 
Le Havre, France 

('■.unilidaie for B.A. Degree 



Cl\ra May SMirii 
Houston 

Candidale for B.A. Degree 

Y. \V- C. \. "29. "30: Inter-Religious 
Council "30; Methodist Council '30; 
Engineering Sliow "30. 




M' •< T? 




Kiiz vni-rii \I \i m S\Tr! ii 

II.MISIOII 

(M.;iluhil<- fnr H. I. Ihyrrr 

^ . W i: \. JK ":',ll: r,-ri[iis Club '28- 
'?M: liil.i-llrlii;ioiis Cciiiiiil 'in-:!!!. 
I'li-^iclciil ':!(l 



I ,1 \\ 1^ I'jtw l^ ^\l I I H 
I'.l.riuHI.' 

Cnii.llil,,!,- Inr n. I l),;iir,' 

|;:,IK l.hil. ■:;(); l; S l . -ricnsm.-r 
■.',(1: \l;i\ I'Vir ':!(l, Kiim. 





Li;\\Ts St1)M:^ Smmh 
l',MSl,,,p 

<:,in:li<lnlr fur Ii I. I >,-,irrr 

Ciipiiriil Ci.wii ('..,111111111. ■(■ ■:',ll: C\ 
isli-N \sMsliinl Mil: It^ilK CI. ill 



( )mu i.N III SSI 1,1 S\i 1 111 

I'ill.'Slill.' 

Camlithtiv fur H.A. Ih-iim 



I' \l 1 \ I M N Smi I II 
l.;.h.'sl.,ii 

(„,„l„lalr l„r Ii \ I Ir.jn;' 

V Iiall 'L'T-'-Xl; !',;,s,.|,;,l| ■■2---:'<: 

<'.li.'iinii:iii lliii^ ( '.iiiiniill.'.' I.ii' ( Jiiss 

..r ■:',i). 



I ! . I II .1 r \ N Stiniu;l,l.s 

II..IISI..I1 

('„n,ll,l,ilr l„r Ii I. /l,',,/-.r 

II \\ I. S 'I'T-'lld. (:..lr.-s| liii;: 

S.-.i.-hirv "ID; IJiiiiiwIic Club J'l, 







I''n\NcES loNE SpH^cr; 

I IdllSlOtl 

(Uiniliilalr for H \. I Irijrec 

n W . L. S. ■:»!; (',Mrii|i;iiul.- ':',(); 
llii.slici '-11. 'J'). ':'.(l; I'jiilor C.K-V.A 
riiirsh.i ■:!» DrMiliiilic- C.lul) 'IR. '1'): 
Wiiliiii; r.hil, -I'li-':',!): II, ,11,). IS, .11 
■_"l, ':',ll; li ;in,l Ihllll \ss,„i;i I i.iii ■:',(1 



l,i> 1 !.n 11 \-» M,>M> Sr \N,l \\ F 
ll,,usl,,ii 

liuiiliilalr (•„■ />• ,S' ,„ U /•; 

l':ili:lii,,riiiL- S,.,i,lN: I'.i.ii.l: \ S \l 

i:. 



1 1 1 n \ > I \ KK 1,^ 

Cmuliiluir for IIS. in E. E. 

\ \\. C. A. '2il-';!(l, Si-,T,-liiry ' I'K 
':■,(): T,-Tiiiis Cliil. '2!:-':i(i. I',,ll;,s 

Mil, -11, ■ l,il,'r;,i\ S,„ii'ly S,-h,>liilsln|i 
■_>'); l';il,-n \\s,.n W ils,,,! S,-|i,.liirslu|i 



* "ii Ml 1 1,, \,. Si i:b,;kr 

ll,i,i-.l<in 



i:,ni<liil,:l,- (i,r It I Ih-qn- 

Imii, h riiii, '-:-.-■?,». 



I >ii|,iH lit S'KIKI-.S 
IImii^I,,,, 

( „,;,/;</,//,■ /„;■ /> 1 Dri/irc 

i: I; I. S . Tr, iis'if,! '2'<: i'lilniii 
I '.niiiiinll,',' lor l-'iii,il Hull ■:',l). 



II V \ \l,,Mi li I NIU S I DNE 
ll,iiisl,>n 

Cin, //,/.!/,■ fur H..S In \I. E. 

lMi;;Iii,'rT-in^ S()ci,'ly. 









Til i:in)imi': AlI'HKd Stuong 
\lt'iii|iliis, lY^inessee 

(miiiUiIiiI,' fur H.A. Ihyri;' 

Thr.-slicr 'iT-'IU): \ssisliiiil Iviil.i 
i;.lil..r ':',0; Hally Club ■.id 



.(ami;s iMooRE Sri^Rcis 
D.-iiisc)ii 

Canilulitli- far U.S. in E.E. 

Eii^iueering Sociely "2T-';U): Assis- 
tant in Malhematics '29, '30. 



James Tbottkh Sw \nsun, .lit. 
Navasola 

CamUiJalr fur K I. Drrir,;- 

lialK r.luh ■l'{>-:!(I: |:\.( llli\r ( (MHK il 

'uO: .\l\liU«llil\il SiKictN '2:-'.w. 
nice Nite Executive Coniniil In' "2'': 
Junior Dulie, May Fele '2'>; |)iinM 
Major, Rice BaTid :',(); I )., Dialiniis 
Junior Prom '29. 



Oscar Ck:i-:iu) T,\r,Ri;i(r 
Waco 

Cundiilair fur B.S. in M.E. 

ICuKiiiecriiLK Sociely '2T-':l(l; A. S. M. 
Iv '29; B. S. II. Coiiniil '29; Itic e Mir 
'27. '29; ?:nj;'i; Show '211, ■.'.O 



.1 \ \i i-:s Udell Teague 
W est Columbia 

(Mlidlllalr fur li 1. I Inirr 



Ev.vN Foster Tiio^rAs 
San Francisco, California 

(Mlliliitulr fur B..1. Dr.irr,' 

Treasurer Freshman Class '27; Piesi 
<leiil Junior Class '29; S(aii<>r llia/.ei 
Cdimuillee ';i(l; Foolliall '29;l',askel 
hall '2«-':>,(l; Sludeill Cuuiieil Ue|i- 
reseTilalive '30. 





I I lb 




MiTTiE Saba Ti.nsley 
Houston 

Cunl'tiInU' for B.A. Degree 



Mary Elizabeth Tisdale 
Houston 

iUtiKlidiilr for B.A. Degree 

(). W. L. S. '^T-'IKl; Dance Commit- 
Ice '21); Honor Roll '27-'30: Cap and 
Gowns Conimi Uee "30 : Thresher "29,30 ; 
Society Editor '29; Co-Ed Thresher 
'30: Campanile '30: May Fete '30. 






M xRCARET Anne Toleb 
I louston 

Citndidnlc for S..-L Degree 

Tennis Club Treasurer '30: Y. W. C. 
\. Cabinet, '29, '30; Girls' Gym Class 
"27. '28; Honorable Mention for Gr;i- 
hiirn Baker Scholarship '29: Spanish 
Grader. *29: Girls' Glee Club '29. 
'30: Tnter-Religious Council '29- '3 (t; 
Phi P.ela Kappa. 



\\\ iHiLPH Harry Tolson 
llowe 

Candidale for B..[. Degree 

\n hiteetural Society ^^O. 



WiLi.iA-M Keesee Van Zandt 
Fort Worth 

Caiidiihtle for BS. in C. E. 

SI udriil ('(juncil; Engineering Society ; 
Rally Club: .\. S. C. E. 




I^ijw \UD John \ogel 
Houston 

i'.iiiididiile for B..\. Degree 




i 




llousluii 
iiiliili.l.ilr inr II 1. /),■,/;■,•,• 
I'.. IV K. S. '27 -lid: I ;l.-r I '.lull 

^ . w . c \. 'I'll 



l)»in(iiii\ ( "lui ^l■.^ln■,^ W \lki.h 
Housk)ii 

l_:,lli(liiliil,- far H 1, Itriin-r 

(lice ('lull '-Zl-'-.W; \ W C, \ 
'-If.: \\. S. V. '-I'-'-.W. 





I r.iii. II w M.I, I 



iMiuiui.ii, I, II US III c. /•:. 



H^ So.irlj r,-'M: \. s. 



C. Iv "111 



r, Muil.^N I'll,!/ Mil. Ill \\ \MIIUiR\ 
llouslnil 

Ciiiiliiliilr for II. I Driim- 



\1 Mil I IM I'll \ M I ^ W \l'TS 

r.nhT 
Cinilliliil,' f,,r />• 1 /),',//,■<■ 



( ll \ lii , m; AN \\ i;iU5 
Diillas 

Ciiiilhlair fur «, 1 , llnirrr 

\,«isliiiil I'liiiliir l''ri-sliinaii 'riiirsliiT 
"27. liiisiiicss Maiiji^rr Suplnniun'i- 
■riii-.-sli.T '21!, \ilvrrlisinK Maii:i;;iT 
■I'hi.'sliiT ■:',0; Sliiiii|i dull ■l'7-'211: 
,lii[il(ir Primi "2'*: Siiiiiir Hinji (',(mii- 
niillrr ':',ll: li:ill\ Clul. '[Ill 




^^ -^ 1^ I 




1- 




1m)Miii-: (^Jiralid Westeri u-:ld 
IIoiikIoii 

CuiiduUih' for B.A. I)i;jree 

V \. L. S. '2T-'3(1. \ uc-l>icsi<lriil 
':tU; May Fete '27-'30, Duchess "27; 
Nice-President Junior CUiss '2Q; Vice- 
I'n'sidenI Senior Cliiss '311. 



Janie Ciiai'IN Wi;srMORi:i.ANi> 
Kaiih- Lake 

Cinididulf for B. \. Unjiw 

Dwell Wisler Lileriiry Soei<4,y Se 
relary ':!«. 





Adele Wharton 
Houston 

(Uutdiihltr I'm B.\. J)r<ircc 

l-;iiz:ihellL l-ialilwin Lilerary Soeiely. 



<:i-:nevieve White 
Houston 

Ijiiididali' (or HA. Ihiirre 

C,\n- C.lnl), Presidrnl ':W: freiirli 
Clul.; ("jaiuTier Cluh 





('|-:(:1E ! ) \\ 111 \\ [I.ETAMS 
HoilSl(.ll 

Ciliilidlllr for B. \. Dnirr 

l-'nolhall ■2K-':!(I. 



'l<".]j:V ElJSE WlLLI\MSOi\ 

llouslon 

Cindidiilr for B.A. Degree 

I' \ L. S. '2T-'3(); Fresluiian \\i\<\ 
seiilalive on Woman's ('ouiieii 27 





.Ikrsh M vjor Willis 
Fori Woilh 

Caiiduhile for B.A. Degree 

Cross-Counlry 'i]8\ 29'; Caplain '29; 
Track '29, '30. 



.Tamks Thomas W ilmihei 
HouslOTi 

CancUddle for B.A. Degree 

Cross-Country '27- "29: Trark '29, 





.l\Mi;s I)l H\\ \iU) WiTTE 

Levi t a 
('.(ludiditle for B.A. Degree 



Otto Frederick Woesiemeyer 
Housloii 

C>u)i!li}ah' for B-A. Degree 

\rrliilccliir;-il .^ociely. 





[Elizabeth Lee Workman 
Houslon 

Ciiiididalr for B.A. hetjree 



lioitstoii 
Cninluliiir for B.A. Deijre 




I 






Wilbur Wright, Jr. 
Waco 

Candithilc for SS. in E. E. 

Rally Club '29, '30; Engineering; So- 
ciety '26-"30; Engineering Dance 
Committee '29 ; President Engineer- 
ing Society '30; Mgr. Programs, Engi- 
neering Show '30; A. I. E. E. '26-'30; 
Cliairman Music Committee '30. 



John R. Yancey 

Sicily Island, Louisiana 

Candidate for B.S. in E. E. 

Engineering Society '27-'30, Piesidetil 
"28, Treasurer '29; Rally Club '29; 
Manager E. E. Dcpt. Engineering 
Show '30. 



Fr.vnk Raymond Yeatman, Jr. 
Lake Charles, Louisiana 

Candidate for B.A. Degree 

Rally Club '29. "30. 



Kh VNCES Marie Zilker 
Houston 

Candidate for B.A. Degree 



Nicholas Newton Zirbel 
Houston 

Candidate for B..A. Degree 



1 ' WID ZUBER 

Houston 
Candidate for B.A. Degree 
Basket Ball '28, '30, Caii(ain 30. 






c~- 




J IT IV I 



R S 




B 
E 
B 
B 



B 
B 



.irxiORS. «-rAss of i5>:ii 

OJIinrs 

.1 \Ki; lli;>s. Jr. Prcsidriil 

ViRGiMV Kki;i> I icc-l'n'sidcnl 

TllOM \S II KNItERSON 

Secretarv- 1 rcdsurcr 



llKS 



The Pictures: 
Keed. Henderson. 





Till-: PIIOM r.oMMITTKES 

iitll, \l I lil'in, Cfiifiid Clttiinmui 



1 



Hrlrrshiiinil Ciiiiiiiiilirr g 

How I ^ \ M AcLAl'iilll.lN, i'.liinnnttn 3 

\1 \ H I II \ Sn-:\\ \ur I ) w id ( I \nnls(»\ ^ 

Dcrdiiilinii I'.niitniill,;- 3 

('.HAHl.i:s iM\uMi\i,i,. i'Juiirnian 3 

'rrii)MAs BitowM-: Jack Tlikner 3 

M(HU;,\\ C \MI'HI-:l.l. lUiSTEB TRYO^ 3 

I'lilniiis Ij.iiuiiille,' 3 

\l\in r \ i.i.n lll:l , (:ti(iiriiifiN ^ 

<'.\lnn\N (.1 l,\ i:it .1 Kysili Jones 3 

Imj,\ ( ini:i,\\\ ool) 3 

Hull inlnnnlirr | 

li I ^>t I. l.l.l J \l Olll' \l \HK I lol'hINN 3 

l/.i.slf Cniiiniillrr 1 

TnDM \s |{(H(;ii. < ■hnirtiiiin 3 

I'lin 11' 111 w I 

l'n,(ir,iii,s ,1,1,1 Hl,h <:,„„„, ill,;- 3 

JiH', \ l-l-t:\. ('.Ii„inii,in ^ 

III I I N Willi 1M> M ut(.Mii I MrCMiiin 1 

I'',,, ,1/1,;' (Ailliltiillff 3 

Joi: ()\\i-:ns. Chuintiiiii a 

II MU II Ni.KMi.l II I. lli;N,si,ia 3 



l^f 




VOLNEY \H(:lllTt M.I) Xcill-.SON 



.lOE ArI III U Vl.i.KN 



De 



VNE AmKKM \N 



( iiAiRK Nkll \i'sri\ 



E How AUI) _\1 VLCOl.M BaN\EK 



Kl. Wortl 



^ Lous \tMAK MlI.TON UVKNETTK 

i Houston 



B ESTELV Hm(I!i:I)V 

B 

c John Robertson Bevver 



E Gr\(:E SeLMV nERLlNC 



T.aredi 



( ;o(lle\ 



Houston 



Frost 3 



3 
3 
3 



lloll>lol1 



}louslou 



3 
3 



E Doris \\nk Uinkord 

g IToustou 




i 



£ (:ii\Ki,i:s Mki.mn Blair 

g Verm 111 

p (iicoiici: l)t \i:nN(iv T?i.(»:iii:ii 

E I Ions I on 

^ C;i;(>i!(,i w V C. l!o>'?\'ER 

E lloiislon 



E (;L()KIV |]l,l/,ABETIl Hk\M)T 
E lloMslon 



II Miol 11 v.. Hli M 



.|l>ll\ ( )l,l\ \:\{ UkoH N 



I Idiislon 



lloMSlol 



\ k 









.,^>^ 




\1 M lilNE MyRTLI: liliciu ■ 



W \i,TKR Carroll T?K(iur 



KoHKRTV r,. BrI !\ET 



.) \Mi.s \ i( TOR Bush 



M U RLNE LeOLA lil SlI 



John W 11.1.1 VM BvERS 



lion-ton I 

a 

Honston 1 

3 

3 
Houston 3 

3 

llonston 3 

I 

3 

3 
I 

Ilon>ton 3 
Denison 3 




i CxTHRYN Cl I.VKH 



DuKlS DiSSEN 



E Paul Christoi'h IJokhking. .In. 



p Vkrner ,Ti dso^ Donnelly 



Lewis Bertrvnd Downing 



Dorothy A. Dkeaper 



Rosirv Ceyanes 1 

Hifiwnsvillt' 3 

Dorothy Cuny Comi'ton i 

lliiuston 3 

R \\>u \Ei. Conte i 

Hoiis^toil 3 



WiLiiwi L^^^RE^(:K ( looK 3 

llcill^toll 3 

Anne (^ornelii s 3 

ll<>ii>lori I 

Agnes Louise Cillen 1 

lli)ustiin 3 



llolisloll 



rii)iisiiiii 



ll()ll>lnll 



I l<ill>l<ill 



Houston 



Hollsldll 




^ Joi: 1Kmm\n Eagle 

c Hoiislon 

I Aktiiii! I{ vymom) T^l)\^ \ui)s 
I Siuitlnillc 

£ (ill VUI.KS \. I \l!lilN(;T(1N 

^ II 



\est\ M vkie Fields 



llousloii 



nouKiii'i ri,\(;(; 



I Malakoir 

c (^i.Min; I'uiiscoir I'ljiod 





I'uvNcKs l?K\ i;l Foster 



K \tiii;kink Fosiek 



\a)\\ viu) M i;iiiii(:k I'k\ 



I\i;iiu;n .1 m ksn\ (;m,i,\\\\y 



Joi; /. (• \u/ \. In. 



Nan?sie \F\e (^ avle 



Houston 3 



3 
llolisloll i 



3 
3 

3 

Fori \\,,rlli I 

3 
3 

Kaiiircr 3 



3 
3 



1?I()\M1S\ i 



Houston 3 



-p 







E KlLA (^()R1\NK (tRKKNUOOIi 



£ ROBEUT JOSKI'H GuLDEiV 



E .l<>^^ li. II Mil V. In. 



e George N. Hawley 



Thomas A. Henderson 



Harold Lehoy ?Ie\sley 



d ^ "m. T^. 



GlsTA\E John (;eykr 3 

Dallas I 

\\ M.IEU (ilNTZ a 

'Nac()[r<lo('li(>s 3 



SaVANWH (ilRVRDEY 



ll<>ll>li>l 



lli:i,E\ GoiKoisK'i 



lliill^loli 



I )(il!(ll II \ li. ( iltEES 



ilacios 3 



\i,i:\ \M)i;u (;i!i:E\'ri!i;i', 3 

(iaUoldii 1 



llllllhtoM 



(:,,1„M-II 





*Jt 



M'l' 



llimsloii 



ikLhk 



lollSldll 


P»- 


1^ 


\\ aco 
\ ictoiia 








1/ r " — - 

J- 





^coTT Lee Hild 



,T v( (II! II. I Iess. Jr. 



Iloiisl. 



I ^\ I III. 1. 1 \K\ 



Foil Wciih 



Dallas 










M AUK C Mi I « ItlGHT I loI'MNS 
llollSloll 

I WIIS (il! \l!i;i. II I CK KH\ 

Au.*tiii 




JOHN JiiM HlRT 



Viae 



* ssr ^ 



\ 



^^, 



"n ,< 




P VR\ IjEE Tn(;r vm 







■^2^ #r 



K \ in vuiM'; M \i!(; \i!i;i ,| vcksofs 



Ki s,>iEi, Lee ,| vcobe 



Janeva Lol ise Jacob,s 



Zelma 1'alline .Iett 



.Te.s.sie .Tones 



Houston 



Houston 



Houston 



Houston 



Houston 



Houston 




Kathkyn Log IE 



E 
I 



E James Catherim-: Long 



I 



I 

I 

I 



MoRKis Ldwarij Lldtke 



M vR(;\RET McCarthy 



William A[rL\rRi\ MrK \y 



\\'m.ii;r Lehmaivn Jidd i 

lloiisloii 3 

Fviiiick .|(»Ei'ii Ki:\TiN(, 3 

lldu.-ton i 

Frvnklin KiiMMii) Ki;>m;i)y 1 

Dallas I 

i 

M Ai!i;i erite S. Kennedy 3 

Houston 3 

W 11,1,1 \M OSLER [jE\CH 3 

Sweetwater 3 

3 

Klizvretii Frances Logan 3 

Hoiistiiii 3 



llnll-loll 



TIoii>lori 



lloij-lon 



lldU^toIl 



i Jerome Gore McKevn 



Houston 




E I' \i mm; \ . \l \(:L)()N M.n 

^ Houston 

i Kdu i:\ \ \1 vcLvi CHI.IN 

E llou^loii 

E Ykagkk I.i:i: \1 viiMNS 

E (^ori)iis Clirif li 



E C\l IIIOKIM; I.. \1 MiMIDN 

p llnll^loll 

E M\H(;\HKT Lki; \I\htin 

H lloiistoii 

E Regjin A Alick M \tthews 

= Houston 










/l 



-^ -* #s* 



ii 




^ 







^B^. 




\ lOLKT M U1EIJNE MaTTSON 



Eu\M> Samlel Metzleu 



John Lewis Moiehei 



Tmom^s IJichard Moore 



\\ 11,1,1 VM W ILKINS Ml Ul'lf^. In. 



Annalee Nelson 



Houston 



Houston 3 



J'cvinour 3 



Houston 3 



Houston ^ 



Houston 3 




Gakolyn Jaynk Penfielu 



I Kl( IIU(D ()l'I]VTIN PEiriFTLS 



E Awii: |{ n (,)i vLTRAK.n 



% Ell;\m(k Dekuv (^tvi.\ 



E A llll.lM \ l)\MUE KeED 



c ]I\/EL Frances Reid 



II \T!\ Ev Nora ELL 



Km/, uiEiii IN YE 



Hcaiinionl 3 



Clili,,,, I 



Anna Hektiia OI'iel 



iiistoii 3 



TolIN Si VNLEI ( »LI\ ER 3 

3 
Hiiusloii 3 

Joseph \M)KEn < »\^ ens § 

Heauiiiiiiil 3 

J \^1KS I, VNE I' UiKER 3 



lli>u>t<>r! 



lluiislori 



Iloil>ti)H 



Hdii^lori 



Houston 



Houston 




Houston 
Siiii Vnldiiiii 

M MtCl ERITE A . Ixolll H rsuN 

Houston 

I ESSIE De« K(H!INS0\ 

Missouri (lit\ 



E LdLlS KoSEMiEHI, 



Betsy Ross 



Houston 



Houston 





\\ ll.r.lWl (il illHIE KlSSEl,L 

Pin.- I?lnff. \ikansas 



3 
3 



Jl LIEINNE SVKOWITZ 



HoUBY S VM1ERFORD 



Elsie S<:ii>eii>er 



Stella \I \itii; Sciii id \ 



I louston 



Ran" 



Houston 



Houston 



(lll\KI,ES NoR^IViV SCHWVRZ 

New ()ileans. Louisiana 



V 1 



\ 



P«^; 





^ ^ 





•» < 




i JuANiTA Rose Stevens 



E Martha KatheriiVe Stewart 



Jean Eleanor Strobel 



fc Millard Seals Taggart 



1 Mary Tallichet 



% Charles Reece Taylor 



Helen Nina Scott % 

Houston 3 

LuciLE Scott 1 

Houston 3 

Marian Seaman f 

Houston 3 



Gi s Sellingsloh 



I 



Houston 



Marion Judson Smitii § 

(,)uanali 3 

Albert Cus Sollberger 1 

Houston 3 



Houslon 



Houston 



Clienang( 



Houston 



Houston 



Houston 




^ « ^'' 



I llollMoll 



£ ElEAN(II! 'ril(lUM;i,l. 



lldllStoll 



E AlLEEN TllOltsrENBEKG 

= IIoUsIdii 



£ llEMfV Lol IS TltOST 

I llnu>l,, 

E John I, v whence Tryo> 



Houston 



— El>N V M \^ \ VLGIIAN 



Houston 





kkMil 



IJaiiky Vinock 



I'miv, I'\i T, Volkmer 



l,u uiM, Elizabeth \\ \i>i. 



(1. \. W \LL 



k \ I IE IImm \ Walter 



Ttiehm vn W \Kn 



Beaumont 3 



Edna 



Houston f 



Houston 5 



Houston H 



Hico 




E 

g Madden Trwis Wokks 

I 

i 

i W AKKENA Anna W okley 
I 

I 

E BoWMW W()KTMI\(;TOiV 

i 

£ Harold Bell Wright 

= Evelyn Yorty 



lloll^loM 



Ft. Woiih 



llllll^ll 



HollsloM 



Dallas 



Hoiisiiin 



Ei)\ \ K \ riiRYN Wi;rsM\\N 1 

lldiision 1 

Ki:\ II \ui)i\(; \\ 111 1 1; 1 

IToiistim 3 

Kolth.li r SaMI EL \V IIITELEY 3 

iiiiisix.io i 



lli.M \ Booth \Villh>ls 



Houston ^ 

SlIlMI .1. W ILSON. JR. 3 

Fi. Wuiih I 

KkKHII\I(I) K. W I\M,EI{ 3 

Houston 3 







^ 










S O P H O 31 O IS K S 



T 



r^ki 



MIPIIO>IOIKi:.S.rLAS^iol lfKfi2 



^ Tor 

I B(n 



Tifi; IMCTL KES 

— Fritz Ihtrt. 

VOM^Cannvu Lewis J U'rhvit Sawyer. 





omcEus I 

Frit/, Hart President 3 

Carmkn Lbwis Vice-P reside nl 3 

TlMini:nr S\\\"\ |.:r Serrelnrv-Trenstirer a 

3 

COAIMITTEES 1 

(ieiiertil ( '.(iiniuiilee 3 

ni;iini:\ \ IBM (Ml (.JiairnKiii 3 

Ciiiusiim: I'lU'i: Mai mci-: Kattmvn 3 

3 

DentrfiHoii CoinniiUee 3 

Karl, A^]T■:HM,\I\ Chiiiriri<iii 3 

Frank Hopkins M\hi\n Mellinger ^ 

(Ieorge Osbi r> * '. \ iii[:him: Montgomery 3 

l''i.EANOu 15ar\'es Kimn.i'ii Ti uni \tim; 3 

I 

.'Irfrrshinnil Cnniinillrr ^ 

I*" \ iiNsw ( III I II ('m.iiih n (liuiniHiii 3 

\l \m Mmi--ii\ii I'iiu.i sun (J. \\ . Hewitt =a 

\aomi (Ji m% TiiiiRUN Green 3 

jM \r<; \rkt Dunn 3 

\hisir Cnininilire ^ 

\i';i.soN Hi ssEiX Clniirmnti 3 

I'.iLL Cn \N/- I. till Ikrhkii, 3 

liirllnllnns Cnninnilrr | 

I ) \\ III I )(»\ui;iiL i; ('hainiian 3 

Hkhreri S\\\ YEU K\ 1:1.^ n Higinbotham ^ 

r.\mn 'IM-iioT Helen Batte 3 




I 



RlCHVRD Vi 11.1,1 VM BaI.ZKN 

San Vnldiiio 
Kleanor Baknes 

Houston 
lldK \(;e J VCK Harnes 

Galveston 



E Ri BY Frances Bartine 



1 Helen Elizabeth B vttk 



Houston 



n<>nsl< 



£ Bernard Hyman Bayer 



E (iHRTRL DE R\Y Be\RIJ 

E Charles Kenneth Bell 

E \lh:e Blazek 

E M VNl EL (JORDDN BlOOM 

E |n\ Helen e Boyd 

E Mildred Lot lse Bram vn 



R El BEN Ray Albaigh 



M \RY Mozelle Alois 



Sun Anl<jnio 3 



Houston 3 



Margaret Evelyn Allerton 



1' \i\\. \merm \n 

l)\\ i(;iiT Hall Alstin 

Richard Perry Bvldry 



Houston 3 

a 

Houston 3 

3 
Houston 3 

I't. Worth 3 




Ai.ici-; HiiirioN 



i Ki it\ l\i,iz\isi:i II lii!(>\\\ 



£ \ N N \ \ im.l M \ I! I I l!KI)l)k 



Aiici: \I VII III \ l!i \TON 



l',\ r.LYN Leslie Bybee 



Tlolisloil 



ll<>ii>i< 



Kt. Worth 



ll()ii>i(>ii 



I loM-^lon 



KksTI S I-'M! N-\\(1U III ( i M.llul'N 

Houston 





Ki I M Ivvki.im: ( '. vmckkll 
Mks. L. E. Cvrpenter 

LlClV^ CVKLTON (^MtTEK 



Houston 
Tim I (Son 



Na<-oj;(lo(lli>S 

K(>i!i';ii r \l(>iii:i.\MP ( :<n.i; 

Fi'idciirk. ( tkhihoina 

Will,! VM \Ua |;I! ( lolIsM kN 

Lake < iluirlcs. Louisiana 

( ill VKI.OTTIC \\N <iol.l.IN.S 

Houston 



3 

i 



( 111 Mil.KS W 11. 1.1 Wl ( ioOK 

\1 \n\ l.ovisi; ( looK 



Ucauiuont 
Houston 



\1 Mi I II \ Holmes ( ;()iiin<,ii \m 

H 



3 
I 




E \1 \KGAKET Dl >\ 

I 

i M vH.KiHiK Dunn 



£ (7^^E^DOLY^ Helen I)\\\i;i! 

i 



lloll^loll 



£ InllN KdBER I I'] VKER 

i IJttIc- Kdck. \rkan>.i> 



c I'm 1, HwiEK i;i)M( 



= Henry Gls KNt:K 

i 



i .li Nd s Evans 

i 

§ \lbert Fanestiel 

E 

i Sibyl Feldek 



I- I. W.irlh 
M arion 

SiUl.iM- 

( Irdar Ha\ on 

lli>ij>li>ii 



Jesse Lwvrence Courtney 
\V u.Li \M I'. Crvn/ 
\1 un Vdelink 1) WIS 



lliiriibl.' I 
Fl. \\..rlli I 

lloM.^IOII 3 



I ) V\ II) Fl! \M I- I )llM)(,IU E 



K vnii KIN \1 vR<, Msirr I)i;\ki 



(iKUKCi: (;ii.uEi{ 1 Dink 



lldiislon i 

i 

lllMI-llIll I 

ii<>ii>t(iii i 

i 




E Mary Marshall Ferguson 



fc 




Iloiiston 


g 


George Fk v\ki,i> Finley 




i 


Tulsa. 


Oklalioiiia 


1 


Evelyn Frances Flick 


Houston 


1 


Helen Adele Forester 




= 




Houston 


1 


Annye Viola Fraser 


Galveston 


1 


Levert Langston Geren 




E 




Gioesbeck 





Frances Elizabeth Glasson 







Houston 


=5 


Wilbur Kelly Green 




Denison 


3 


Robert 0. Gresham 






13 






Temple 


3 


Jo Beth Griffin 






3 






Houston 


i 


Ruth Rebecca Griffith 


s 




i 


Des 


M 


oines low a 


i 



(George Louis Gl^denrath 



N \()MI \r\RGUERITE GuiON 



E«"inu 



Houston 



\i\\ Hakbolr 



Goose Creek 



M \RY Virginia Harrel 



Houston 3 



III 




KVKLYN lIlGINHOTllAM 



E 
E 



Viiiari 



W. Cone IIoli.im \n 

liartlesxillc. Oklaliorii 



E Frank IIui'kin; 

E 



g Bri.L Til DSPETII 

E 



E Mary Ellzxbeth Hition 



E LoL IS Theodore J AHN 



llc.llhtoll 

Ailiiii;l(iii 
llou^lon 

I lollStoM 



i Charles Francis Johnson 

I Wiihiia FalU 



E Edna Marie Johnson 



E FlvERETT Lynn Johnson 



Houston 



Tfxaikana 



I' iii:i) II \Ki 

K W II UiT 



Slrrator. llliiK.is 3 



Slrralor. lililloi^ a 

M\Ki\N I' RVNCKs Harvey 3 

llousldii 3 



ViriN ^ \1 vE Heinson 
CiivRLEs Vrtiur Hfkhst 
\i vKTH V Loi isE IIii:ke\ 



HollMoll 



lloiision 3 



lloii^lori 3 




I l.di i.\ Hi;ss Johnson 

I Wili,i:tta Bern \iiri .Toiins< 

I I jiMi Nil |{ vMMi Jones 

i \|ol!(; \N JoNI.S 

I Ki III M M! iiN Joosr 

E ls\ni;i,i,\ Ki,i/\UKiii KvsiL 



I Illusion 





M ii.iiiM.i) II i:i,i;ni Kiciiy 

I loustoii 
l'iii:i)Kiui;\ Im,i/,\hkiii Kii.lgore 



CvRoi-vN M vr<:ei,i,e Kini; 



lldiistim 3 



lloustim 3 



I'|!I;iii:ri(;k Wiiiivm koiiMi\isi;N 

Hoiislon 

I I l,(. Mi ( ill MtI.ES kuiEGEL 



\l,l)l N j.lHORIl T.WCASTER 



Wliailiiii i 



lldUSti 



I 

Wll.llVM IlliNEST I.ENH VRT 3 

Eai;lo Lakf 1 
(;i;r iRi i)E Li;\ inson 1 



( '. MiMI.N 1,1 I III \ I.EWIS 



lliiiisliin 3 



lldusliiii 3 




Wendel Dler Ley 



Frances Virginia Long 



Daniel Bayne Lovejoy 



lloMSloll 3 



lliiiisiiin 3 



llollstoll 3 



John Kenneth McLeese 

Jennings. Loiiisiaiui 



Dorothy Ann McWhirter 



Clayton James Meadows 



Houston 



llollsloJI 



£ 


M VKIUN M KLLINGER 


i 


Ilolistoll 


^ 


M\K\iN M\(ri(:e Mkklk 


1 


1 loMsloll 

Nathan K. M illek. ,1k. 

Lufkin 


i 


Kenneth Niswanger Mills 

Ft. Woiih 


: 


Charles Henderson Mnis 


1 


Fl Uorailo. Xi'kaiisas 


= 


Catherine Viola Montgomery 


i 


llolisloll 

LoNNiE Allen Moore 



lloMSlc 



1 Robert Sparks Morcom 



T I oil St on 



i Jefferson Davis Motheral 



Houston 




■«i ■ .* \ju 



B ErM.SIIM. MolHSLM) 



E Henry (ji\rii:s Nagel. .hi. 



Ilollsh 



i 
E 


Marie Nemir 


1 l()U,-.|(iri 




Na\;isot:i 


1 






^ 


E\ V l.oi i>i: N i,\\ M \N 






HvRRV Scott Nor:\ia> 


lldll^lllM 


g 


Marie Celksti: <)i,i\ \ri 


Tloiisloll 





(George Olamio Osbi rn 

Slin'x i']i(iil. Louisiana 

(ioRNELH CoNKLlN 1'eARCE 

Houston 



M \iiY Belle Perkins 



Houston 3 



I.E(I\()U\ KlIZ Mtl; I II l'l,l)\\l)EN 

Houston 



A. Carleton Polk 

\\ iLLL\M Green Pmi m<i) 

Mabel Ciirisitnk I'oim; 
Genevieve El(;kni\ P'i le 

IIdHIN 1'a IRICK ( >l 1\N 



Houston 
I lonston 

Houston 
Houston 
Houston 



fS 


•» ^ ,f? 




k ' 


ku \M 




f> 


^ 


^ 


'^:- 

^ W:- 


^"■■*i^ 



B Josephine Rogers 



i Gerard ^ illivm Rilfs 



E M \BEL Charlotte Rllfs 



_M \Ry (ilLMOl H RlST 



lliiii^'tori 



Hdiistiiii 



ll<>iiM( 



ildiiston 



= James IIerberp Sa\\ykr. Jr. 



E Gladys Elizabeth Schill 

E Jack Scott 
I 

p Cleo Segrest 

E Maggie Kendall Shearn 



Houston 

Dallas 
TToiiston 
I loiistoii 



Elizabeth Vergil Raney 

John Leslie R awls 

W iLLi v\i ^\ iiitmv I\i; \iii;r 

Nelda Rum \ Rkichert 
ViMN(; T. Reynolds 
LiLLiE Evelyn Rienhardt 



Texarkana 3 

Hoiist(jii 3 

3 

Houston 3 

3 

lloU>loll I 

Houston 3 

3 
Houston 3 

I 




E MlLl'O.N Le>AKIJ SlLBERSTEIN 







MarslKill 


Hli:ll\HI) l.<>\\ ELL SiNDER 


SON 


Housldn 


Doris Gladys Smith 




( )linili) 


LE^^ Ls Allan Smith 




Haskell 


M\RY Alice Stevens 




lloMStoll 


Caihekine K.\hl\ Stone 




llousloii 





.1 \i:k \\ II 1,1 \M Stone 

W anensbiirg, Missouri 

KoSWll NUE KiSHER StROZIER 

Houston 

H USUI W ISE Tu.BOT 

Houston 
M \i<(.\i;i;'r NFadeleine Twlor 

I loMStoll 

John S'I'\nley Temple 

Port Aitliur 

Vl WINE Tindall 

Houston 



As\ Elbert Ti rner 

,1 VCK It RNER 



Houston 
Dallas 



Kl DDLI'll \n|)KE\\ I'l RRENTINE 

Houston 



3 



i.».ii . . -v a 




g Lewis Aniikk^n Wii.kie. Jr. 

E Walter Wilford WILKI^so^' 

E St("i)li<Mi\ illc 



i Martha Ei.i.en ^'illi\m- 



E Berisice E. Willia^iso> 



E D(>R<iTn\ Mary Wilson 



Ilollnloll 



Himstdi 



( Jioe^licck 



E R xM'hi W DoDRun Wilson 

^ Grand Prairie 



£ Paul Hunter Wolf 
E Lois Melissa Wright 



ll<jLi»l(jn 



g Corpus Christi 

p Margaret Young Wright 

E Houston 



\. KlTCHEY TyGRET § 

Mineral Wells | 



\1 VRVIN Hugo Urrvntki. 
M. Clairice Vickrey 

(JoRA Carolyn W alker 



Houston a 

Houston 3 

3 
3 

Ildu^lcin 3 



Nan<:y Elizabeth Weisinger 

Monljionier\ 



Benson G. Wells 



Goliad i 





-J -«■ 



'L. . ~ 




FRESH 



E N 



.T 



■HRIIHI 



^ ' ^ »=. 



E FltKSII>IKX CLx\>»S OF liKf.t 

I 
I 

i 

I 

E 

£ Till-; Pi( Ti RKs 

i 

i 'I'dl': \(irlli<ull. 

E lioiioM: ] i(<iii!iir. Coljt'c. 





Offic-n. 



Percy Northcltt Frcsidcnl 3 



\i\i\\ \ii:»k(;kk \ ii( -t'n sidail 



IdllN (ioKFEE . Sccntdrv-'rrcasiin 




,;^ #*>* I 




( iiniiuillrt'y 



lion Iti IN Cliii'l (Ikiiiiiuii 



liMMi}'. Vol \TS ('Iidiniinii 1 11(1(1 3 



\V iLEY George Aasisianl 3 



H \^ II VRBOl R Asslsldlll 3 



loiiN Coffee Big Gun) 3 





4^ 


9 







(iisiix r:i! l-!i( n vhd \i>\m-. 



l)<Mli^,, 



Bermck Ktoii,!-: IUrkkr 

llcMMo 

Vi JNMK 1Ieli-:n I5i.;\m \\ 

Miiiiroc. l.diiisiaiui 
F'kvtdn WiM-KKi) Hi;<:kiivM 

Liilki 
Albkrtx Hi,\(k 

A 1,1, INK 15 HM) 
DoROTII'V HoLI.KR \S.-i 

Jesse Vl illis Ucnnek 

TwiES \\ IIJU R RoRSKKI 

A DELE Boris 

Clay Alems Hhi w 

.]()iiN Henry BRixr.m rsi. Jr. 

ll(>M>loll 

Thom\s Lawrence Bri\mme;tt 

Pin,' Bluff. Arkansas 

\ HK \ \l \' Bl HI>K VI \ 

lloMston 

CiRTis Hunter Birge 

llcin-tiiri 



.lonN '^ (n NG Allen = 

lloii>i,,n I 

Dero Krei>Ai{mlsii.:\i, 3 

Donison 3 

Willi \M IIerkert B vixM.K i 

lldMslon i 

ImiN B \KNEri B mud. .|r. 3 

Dallas I 

.hniN New ION Bvrineal 3 

llousiiin 3 




JAMics Ali.kn (:h\mheki in 

lloli-lori 
II Miin losK.I'H (III AV v>M-; 

Lake (Jharles. Loiiisiaiui 
Lv<:i \mi.i: ( h.w 

I l()ii>tc>n 

I'llUM VS I IlKM \\ ( luNM IN 

\iiKiriil(i 
(!ahl 1- ki:i)l;uick (iiionoiu) 

Dallas 
Ki ni-.N \i,ui:iri (jiosm 

|-ni>l 





r 



J^iM 



"'.D 




ts>%. 







,|()Y(Mi Je\NNETTK DvNNEM!\lM 

llousloll 

M\I{\IN \lerei)\ Da\ is 

Housloii 

I.WONE I.OMMVN DlCKENSIIEETS 

I loUslDll 
I'k \Nk ( A KTIS I )|l,l, 

MdiiiDe. Louisiana 
I-, \i!LE Col s\Ri D(>r(;ns 

llousloll 

James Laurence Dicroz 

Brazoria 
\\ MuiiNiR Mills Farnsworth 

Fairbanks 
I'.ni; \\{ Alfred I' \rris 

Dallas 
(. ^^ Ferguson 

.loaipiiii 
|UM\ TloROlin FONVILLE 

I louslon 
\nn\ \I \H(;\iii r Fooshee 

I louslon 

( )l.l\ I \ ( ioNZM.KZ 

I louslon 
I' \i!i.o (ioNZMi:/. .)r. 

Sail \nlouio 
I I \/,l,l. KiLEKN (ioDDM \N 

lloiislon 







E 


L. H. (iRIFFlTII. .It!. 




B 


Por 


\itlinr 


1 


Selma Ann Griffitt.^ 




1 




l)a\ toil 




Vi;i.M\ \>"N Griffitts 




1 




1 )a\ ton 


E 


GiLMOKE Twi.oli (;\MN. ,|u. 




1 


Sail 


\iiloiiio 


1 


Fr \nk Gorm:i.h s 1 1 \lpin 




B 


H 


I'aiiiiioiil 


\I \RI \N IsMJKI.I.i; TI VMTUI.N 




1 




1 lou^toll 


p 


EUGEM \ 1 1 UUl.TON 




1 




Houslun 


1 


Ei>\\ IN .IdiiN II \M)i;r 




E 




Waco 


E 


jiPIIN BlAKi; II VNKS 




1 


SlnTVCpDl'l. 1 


■oiiisiaiia 


1 


KoHKRT ,T \M ES 1 1 \NN'0> 




1 




lloiislon 


g 


Evelyn Licii.i.i; IIvnson 




1 




Houston 


£ 


Henry Aves IUrhordt 




1 


Mijiiteney N. L. 


. Mexiro 


Iackson Winfield Harris 






1 loiislon 


g 


.JOSEPHINE M Ui> I.IU ISE IIkRIIEIIN 


B. 




Houston 



lolIN Dl N\ (illRDlMER 

I .ak<' ( !liarli>. Eonisiana 

El I, A Al RKI.I V GdSS 

Houston 

I'llOM ^■^ Gl-.R Ml) (iKEM)^ . .111. 

Houston 
Si i; \ iiiciNi \ (;i!ki;n 

Houston 
M ^ I! 1 \ Ei:i; ( -riffin 

(:ic\claii.l 
Si f\u \ii Al (;i si \ (iiiirriN 

Houston 



a 
1 




i 



1 '». 



; '^ 



J ta_ « »■ 



Kl)\\ 1\ USCVI! I I ILL 

Houston 
Lni M. Dki Hill 

(iilnii'i' 
lli;KliF,l{ r I low Mil) HOAG 

.lennings, Louisiana 

l)()l{(llin I' MLINE IIOGGR 

I lonslon 
lll:M{^ M \i iiii;\>s Holdkn 

I lonslon 
Llo"! II Holmes 

I'll Cainpo 



^ 














^ 







^ 



Ix 










4. 









mk 



M Vin I.I (ILK HOICHINS 

Uoiision 
Jesse Bwtek lion m{ii 

(;icc-inilli' 
(Greene (Ilay Hi dcins 

1 1 nn^ciloid 
( !l\iu M( Don \i,i) II i \ i 

W ost Monioi-. Louisiana 
I'kxnk Hoi se >Ii rley 

ilon^loii 
(iEouGi, M\\i\iiLi\N Illi:s 

Dallas 
Dklw in \ i;k\<)n ,1 \mi;s 

I loM^ton 

\l Mn \ ini.iM \ .1 \n\ 1-^ 



Keel /i;lma .Iokdan 
()Li\i;ii Kee^es .Iohden 
I'm I, .1 \MEs K \ I itim 
\l \n> M \it(.M!i.i Ki;\riN(. 

Kl liMII KlIlkLWI) KiMIMI. 

M Mn Im.indkh K i^nmcd^ 



lon>l<>n 
loM>lc)ri 
loll^loll 
loll>loll 
lonslon 
nv|M„l 
loustini 



t^ 1^4 '^l 



I 




Ki( II \iii> Lkon L vsik u'K> 

W a>liiiij.'l<in. I.i>ui>iiina 
Diiiiorin (,M!()i. Li; vRNKii 

1 loll^liill 
P VI 1. \L()IS Lkdkkick 

lliill^loll 

ATklbv FiizuiKiH Lee 

lloiuN Islaiiil 
.luiiN Sn,\^ Li;^\ IS 

Fn'.l.-ri.k. OkhilidiiKi 
Benjamin !• ei.d Lumvmi/. 

Ilciu^lori 
\\ II. 1. 1 \M R. Long 

ll(>M>t(>ll 

Ri TH < )kij; w L(U (.huidi.i; 

lloll^loM 
\\ I I.LI VM H MI'll Low 

Ki. Wdiih 
Aline Cleveland Llcy 

lloll^loll 
lUzEI. Ross Ll DTKE 

llousloll 
M Mil McKl.WEE 

\\ esL Momoc. Louisiana 
Miiiiwi kiivDi.ivH M(;Gak\ 

llollStdll 

Wayne McIIenry 

(rrofUN illf 



JRNS'i k uii Kim'I'i;nii \( ii 

Ni'u l!raimli'l> 
;i;on(,i \ Ki, VK \s 

ilolli-liill 

OHN (;eok(,i; Ki.\u \~ 

ll(Mi>lon 

I MM Ut II ENin kl I 1111 

Sail \ii((iiiio 

'. M(L SeI.I.NEU k 1 UN. lis. 

Gal\ cston 
osi;i'iiiNi; lli:v, R, kuNTSCHEn 

ll(>ii>t(>ii 




E 


Vun i> l.KK McNi 11 


1 


lloii^lon 






B 


\urin 11 \\ \TS()\ \l\usiiM.i 


£ 


\rKiliiiar 


B 


Kvl:h1';ii- Clin ion \1 mm in 


F 


Ucaiirrioiil 


B 


1 1 \i!in JuMN M ^-^l)^ 


B 


llllMSlllll 


E 


E 


l'i!i:i>\ M Ki\sii,i\ 


E 


lliill>loll 


t 


Charles I'kanklln _\1omg<>mi:i!'i 


p 


i;ii;iMill<- 




r. 






i4. 





|{i:Ul- A. jVI I ELLEK 





Houston 


3 


1 )(>l!(llll^ KlUm \l I M,EK 




3 


M AUY AiKO ^AGAl 


1 loiistoii 


^ 

^ 




1 lollsldll 


3 


Vincent Lee Nem.v 




1 




BcaiimoMl 


3 


(111 Mil. Es K\i.i'H Nelson 




3 




l.ockhart 


3 

3 


H M.i'ii \i';H(:(>MEii 




3 


Iowa. 


Louisiana 




(llMKLES \L(;rSTLS NR«niN(; 


3 


(idUDdN lUkEK Nicholson 


Cn\\ rsloii 
.111. 




Houston 




I'eHCY IJWIS INoRl IICUTT 




=a 




McAllcn 


a 


(; Mt \ I'VLM (J'Ut)« IJ 




3 




CIIpIuhiii' 


a 


IIwlett O'Neill. Jr. 




3 




1 louston 


i 


1 1 1 l.u \ ICIUH ( )STERMAN 




3 


Zacalecas Z 


dc. Mexico 


3 


AhlNK I'l.ORENCE ( )lTO 




1 




1 loiislon 


a 


Frances Sim^v Mtr (>verc\sii 


^ 




1 louston 


3 



^-^ 


vft 


1 


n 

-^v. 







.Tamks Ei.i.x Rk.ki). .Tk. 

ll(Mi>l(>ri 

BeRTUANO KlELD KkH \KDS 

Newton, llliniiis 
John Wesley Robinson 

( lalunict. ( )kl;ili(>ni;i 
George Edward Koiikek 

ll(m>lon 

JEA^'^ETTE EsTEIXE RoSE 
]M \RY Lot ISE Rl CKER 

IToiiston 
Waller Ta>dy Scott 

S;iii Vnloniii 
Nellen Sellers 

Ben (tARdner Seuell 

Roy Calvin Se« ell. ,)k. 

Sue Elizabeth Sexton 

Roy Lee Sii\pi'\rd 

John Ralimi Siu rtli;i k 

William Franklin Shltt 



Mh.ion \ in(.n, I'i;ters(in 

I'.LBKIi I \ EKNON I'olLVN 

.1 \cK Bennetp Power 

I?ITII BeUMCE P|!(1\I\S 

l\oi{i;u r 1'm,i:heu (,)i in 
/kl\ L(H isi', lii; \(; \n 



liiiscnlpcr;^ 

1 liiii'i<lla 
Houston 

lloU:^t<>ll 

I liiinilciri 




E \] \I)ELIM, SiiKi.in Simons 

I 

g K\ KLYS \ iui;iM \ Sims 

E \u \ \ iitc.i M \ S\n I'll 

= ( I \KIIM It li. II. Sol i.i: 



Bay Cil> 
I Ion-ton 
llonsiiiii 



I Ion-Ion 



K(iiii:i!r II Mo\oiii) St\n \ki:h 




ft 



J. 






iT- 



%^ 







FkIDIUICK \\ 1. VTHKHKORD StOLTE 

^ aco 

HELEN KlIZVHKTH StoI'KOUII 

Houston 
Chestkk Ai.hx Strvin 

Frost 
l'",i,iz\iu;i II Si'i;ki) Stkkkt 

I lonston 

\ i;HI.\ M, Si lilNGEK 

llonston 
He'i ^^ Ll(i\u Si tile 

( lorsicana 
Jen mi; \. S\\ eeney 

Jlousloii 
Leon .1 \ik Tvi henii vis 

( iollc^ic Station 

I KEDEUlCk r \^ LKK 

Mi.lian.l 

\\ 111 I \M H. T VYI.OH 

Moody 
\\ uuii:n Tiiom \s Tii m; vud 

(fI-on I'ton 
John I,e« is Tinnekeii o 

Dallas 

(iEOltl.E HoLMAN IkII'LETI' 

Houston 
Helen Flizvueth Tl rer 

Aii"li'ioii 




I'UAN'k W ALIACE. .|k. 
I',\1M \ \.n[> \\ \N\ Ml 
loMN l,ll\ K \\ \ 1 IIKN 
I Ton Kll, II. \X KTSdN 
I'l; \HI. \ 1(11, 11 \\ i; W KH 



lloll-loll 

l)all;i> 

Dallas 

I loiisliin 
\1 iNMi. \in:i,i.\ \\ F.iciiKirr 

^ elsli. Louisiana 
Lf.on W i:im!krg 

lloll^lilll 
I will \ Lol ISK \\ KLLS 

I loUstllll 

llMioiii Ij.i snoit I II W i(;i!K> 

Dollsloll 

(JVTHKKIM-; W ILLIVMSON 

I Illusion 
( ll.MRK SlIIOl.TON \\ II.I.'l 

Smilln illc 
Lirii \ M VKioN W II, SUN 

I louslon 

LoNMI-; Kl KL Vol >G 

Frost 

Ll K\ NvPYNK /iKBEL 

llousloll 



\1 M \l Mil, Mill W iri.E 

llou^lon 
II i;i!si iii;i, Mi:( Aii\ i;h \ m i.ii \\ 

Vhilrni- 
\ i\ I \\ Alen'e V'ieuec.er 

San \nlonio 
\ Ilil.lM \ \ lNso\ 

Houston 
LiBBY ^ MSM \\ 

San SaKa 

1,111 ISE Lmm; \\ M.KIB 

Houston 




J^^ifc 







i 









^^^WaJL 




V 



A, 





CAMPUS 



El 




Mips Katrina Smith 



Till' uiUiniclx driith iif kdlriiiii 

Siiiilli (III May 22. 1930 Ikis sikI- 

deni'd IJir inemorx of the crcnls 

llidl (ire ii'hili'd hero. 



Tlll<: lf»2f» >IAY I'KTi: 

An ailislic inodioval (iolliic setting 
fiiinislied tlic Ijaikgnnnid for the an- 
nual May Fete, given this time in the 
late aflerniHin hours of Satm'day, 
May the fourlli. The tali oak trees of 
tiic campus shaded a stone castle with 
turrets and iiigh hattlements, hefore 
whose doors had been placed grace- 
fiilK carved thrones for the assem- 
hhng of tlie court and the crowning of 
Jler Ladyship, Katrina of the House 
of Smith, as Queen of the May. His 
-Majesty. King Edwin of the House of 
(Jragg. was the first to enter. After 
him the royal retinue «as announced 
in the fol low ing order: Carlcton 
I'olk and (Mirisliiic Pope, Duke 
and Duchess of the House of 



Freshman, and the Maids of Honor. Marjorie 
Dunn. Marshall Ferguson, Carmen Lewis, Evelyn 
liiginholhani. Loula l?ess Johnson. Catherine 
\!ontgorner\ . Margaret Dunn. Frances Duncan: 
Charles Ward and Virginia Reed. Duke and 
Duchess of the House of Sophomore, and the 
Maids of Honor. Rowena MacLaugldin. Martha 
Stewart. Kathryn Logue, Dorothy Dionne, Mary 
Lou Moore. Dorolhv Dunn. Margaret McCarthy, 
I'auline MacDonald: James Swanson and llo- 
rnoiselle Haden, Duke and Duchess of the House 
of Junior, and the Maids of Honor, Bernice Lu- 
(leau. Lillian Horlock. Lillie Blake, Mary Hallie 
Berry. Marjorie Nicks. Edvthe Westerfield, 
Evelyn Marrs, Dorothy Bethany: Wendell Ham- 
rick and Ma.xine Jeanes, Duke and Duchess of 
the House of Senior, and the Maids of Honor, 
Evelyn Eplev, Noima Clay. Oquilla Smith. Bever- 
ly Fonville, Frances Sara Gieseke. Charlotte Wil- 
liams. Marjorie Hayes, Fay Etta Hutton; Prin- 
cesses Anita Stewart and Eloviise Hall, and finally 
Her Ladyship, Katrina of the House of Smith, to 
he crowned (^)ueen of the May. 

riie participants were clad in long sweeping 
chiffon, the freshmen in sea green, the sophomores 
in shell pink, the juniors in turquoise blue, the 
seniors in lavender, the |)rinccsses in daffodil yel- 
low, ami the queen in white over lace trimmed 
with seed pearls. 




Cleo Segrest served ;i~ idnil ji-^ler. and Iut irn- 
pisli aiilics were exeeediiijiK well r<'ici\<'d li\ llie 
audienee. 

A jjrograin of eiilerlaiiiriiciil lulloucd (he eoro- 
natioii. \n I'liiglUli folk daiici-. a miIo dance li\ 
Iris Couglilin. and a tundiling exhiliition on tlie 
greensward li\ the l{iee Inndding Team, wliose 
members were dressed as liohhi Hoods liaiid. 
eoni|)rised llie main leatnres. 

At the close of the May Fete Miss Beverly Fon- 
vUle was awarded llie enp given each \ear h\ llie 
(College VX oman"s ( Mul) to llie lies I all-round >enior 
girl. Miss Ilarriil loekel. |iri'>ideiil of llie eluh. 
made the [ireseiilalion. 

■•it I M !<:•>*«» TO l».\IJ..\S I \llt 

\l a meeting of llie eo-eds Miss Lillian llorloek 
was chosen to represent {{ice al ihe Ml ( iollege 
Coronation, held in coniK'ction with the Dallas 
Fair. This is one of the highesl lionor>^ uhich llie 
women students of llie institnle can |ia\ to one ol 
their ninnlier. At ihe review Miss llorloek wore a 
deep ivorv satin evening dress made in the new 
princess st\ le with a deep girdle and uneven hem- 
line. A heauliful jade fealher fan added a touch of 
color lo llie ensemlde. .'^Iie iiinsi lia\e made a 





dee|p iin|ire>sioii. Mr. ( iarl lllig. Jr. 
served a^ her e~eorl al ihi- Fair. 



l(i:i>IKI<:SB.VT.\TIVK TO 
TKX.VS IKOI .M»-l l> 

Miss Martha Stewart was selected 
h\ llie Wonians (Council lo represent 
Kice al llie Texas L'niversit\ Koiiml- 
Lp on A|)ril II. 12. F5 at Austin. 
This is an annual affair, a homecom- 
ing. Mother and Dad's dav. and lliis 
vear was the occasion ol the dedica- 
tion of the new §.500.000 gymnasium 
recently completed. Those in charge 
of the affair, in order to irake il of 
iiUcre.'l lo ihe entire slate, iiuiled 
the |irincipal schools of the slate lo 
send representatives lo take |iarl in 
the Reyiew. held on \]iril II. and 
Miss Stewart served in this ca|iacil\ 
for Kice. '"Hiiddy" L\ kes was lie|- 
escort. 



H.'vrly fc.rivill 
Li:it; Marlhii Slcw;i[l. Lillinri Ilurluck. 



Til i: I'll 1 1 lu ,s — \n 
licsl ;ill-roiiiul ;:irl. 




(!ailii> I liMiiN . SitliU'N Wilson dclivilrd James 
Swaiisdn lor the assistant editorship of the ()«!. 
and Joe Allen was selected as the ()wrs assistant 
Inisiness niaiuifier. (^iis ( j-anz lieeanie cheer leader 
lor- ihc ihird lime. mioiipoM'd. 



II & 4|l ILL KA.XH LT 

The animal K i^ (,)uill lian(|iiel uas held <m 
Ma\ 23. l')24 at the liiazos Conil. Awards were 
made to fortv-six stall niendiers of the three Rice 
|iuldicatioiis. Ravniond Pitts was elected presi- 
denl. Julienne Sakowitz \ icc-|iresidi-nl. and 
(ii'orge Reynolds seerelai\ -Ireasorer id ihe K iX 
< >nill Association for the eorniii" \i'ar. 



Francis \ escv cnierf;i'd victorious 
over a field of four candidates for the 
feature position of the race, president 
of the Student \sso( iaiion. John Rid- 
le\ o|i|ioseil him in the run-otl. Ilo- 
inoiselle I laden won a run-olt election 
o\er Marx llallie l!err\ for the viee- 
presidenc\ of the \ssociation. David 
(iarrison hecanu' treasurer, and Ho- 
mer Matlhes defeated John Silnih- 
macher for the office id I'onncilman- 
-al-large. lor the (lainpauile stall po- 
sitions. Ravniond Pitts was victori- 
ous in a run-oll election over Russel 
Lee Jaeohc. for ihi' liusincss manager- 
ship, lack Scott iiose<l out .luliennc 
Sakowitz. first girl to ever riui for the 
position, in the race for the joh of as- 
sistant editor. \X hitiiex Reader won 
o\er Fritz Hart, the only freslunau to 
lose out. for assistant husim'ss mana- 
ger. I.lhert Turner lii'iame assistant 
editor of the Ihreshcr svithoul oppo- 
sition. Claude Rrooksliire was elected 
its assistant husiness manager over 



R AS«<»ori.\Ti«» ii.\x4|ri<:T 

On May 2.S. i92*). the animal luuKpiit (d' the 
Association was held. Ml forim-r Rice Icttermen 
uere invited to attend, and the customarv R 
awards yvcri' made to all Icttermen (d the year. 
Captains for 1^1.30 were eleclcil in track. Iiase- 
liall. cross coinitrv. and tennis. Noel \\ illis yvas 
eliHled president of the Association. Dud \X vun 
y ice-presidenl. and !• red Stanclill sccretar\ - treas- 
urer for l')2'»-:?(). 



Iiii I'k II I 

I >i I <i\\ : 'I'lif Si'iiioi 



\llii\ I , \ rsr;,, ILhIi-ii, ( liioisun. I'ills 

III. 'I. 




11°) in 



i 



«>iK.MOII ATT IV IT IKS O l< lit'2U 

The idiinil <il siicial aiti\ili('s ol llic s<'iiiiir year 
is so ai'iangt'll tlial giailualion is mail*" the liappi- 
est as well as tlic saddest event of a students liiV 
at Rice. The year is ended in a blaze of lilorv tlial 
leaves an indelible imprint of the lonir-faniiliar 
faces now seen together for the lasl tinii-. llie 
strain of final exams so IrcshK gone llirn seems 
fara«a\ and forgotten. 

The Senior American, called the Senior (German 
before the war, marked the official beginning of 
the commencement activities of 1929. It was held 
Satnrdav morning. .Inne tiie eighth, on llie Kin- 
Roof, and ilancing in the open air pro\ ed to he 
cool and delightfid. A few energetic mi'nd)crs ol 
the class attended the breakfast that preceded 
the dance, and a gay. festive. <are-free spirit pre- 
vailed as the gnests gathered during the forenoon. 
Grillilh Lawhon was in charge of arrangements. 

The Senior Banquet took place Satnrdav even- 
ing at College Inn. \ erv few facnltv mendier^ 
were present, and Dr. Lovett. Mr. McCami. anil 
Mr. McCants were special gnests. Joe Shimek and 
Frankie Gieseke. president and vice-president ol 
the class, presided. Favors were presented the 
gnests. and baskets of pink roses and tall pink 
tapers graced the tables. Roy Davis was chair- 
man of the banquet. 

Thi- S,;ii,ir Filial 





Till- Srninr \inrriran 

Sunda\ morning the senior^ uere 
again entertained en masse at the 
Craniner ( llidi breakfast, annually 
given in llieir honor just before the 
baccalaureate sermon. As usual, the 
guests cauK' in caps and gowns. 

From li\e to seven Mondax after- 
noon I )r. and M r>. Lo\ eti eiilcrlained 
the x-niors and llieir friends uilli the 
annual garden parl\ in the acadi'inic 
court. TIk'v wiMi- assisted in r<'cei\ ing 
the guests bv Dr. Dodd and Dr. Mac- 
Keiizie. the connnencement speakers, 
and b\ .bie Shimek. Frances Sara 
(iiocke. and KaNinoiid Powers, the 
olhcers of the senior ilass. Music was 
furnislK'd b\ the KiceOwl Hand. 

Monda\ niglil ihe lasl good-li\('S 
were said al llic Iradilional Final 
Ball in ihc Kice llolel Hall Kooni. 
riie music wa> furnished b\ Lees 
()wls and the (iliicagoans, and danc- 
ing continued far after midnight. Fa- 
vors were presented to the girls, and 
Rerl I'cckham was chairman ol the 
dance connnittee. 




1 »2» 4 4IMM K.X KM K.VT 

FaiK "11 llii' moriiini; ol .liiiir 
iiliuli .-i\i'r,il ihdu^and \ isitors «atli- 
cred in the Liiivrrsilv (,)iui(liaii^Ho Id 
witness a pari of the final fxercises ol 
(he largi'sl graduating class in the 
liistor\ of the Institute. l'roni|)ll\ al 
nine o clock llic academic |irocessioii 
got under way. led liv nu'ndxr- of the 
lacultx dressed in vari-colored rohe> 
lietokening their \ arions degrees and 
honors, llvunis and Te Dennis were 
sung and the hacealauieate sermon 
was delivered hv the Key. Dr. ^ il- 
liani Douglas MacKeiizie. President 
of Hartford Seminar\ houudatiori. 
Hartford, (jcniiecticut. The snhstanci- 
of the sermon was that the real treas- 
ures ol our nature are the |iouer to 
loye and tin- |]o«er to think. \ll cUc 
is suliordinalc and hansilor\ : these 
are su|prenie and immorlal. 

( )ii Mondav morning, .lime teiilh. 
ceremonies uere again o|)eiied uilli 
an aeadeinic |jroeessioii. Ilie com- 
mencement address was deli\ereil h\ 



Dr. William Eduard Dodil. professor of American 
history at the University of Chicago, on tlie sub- 
ject. 7,s llio Hdhit of TMiclifisiuss Beyond Riinedy 
ill llie Gniites! iij Ri jiuhlit s'f Dr. Dodd was pessim- 
islic ahont oui' present phase o( lawlessness, and 
f-uggested as a remedy a more simple and direct 
political and judicial system. 

Two himdri'd and twelve degrees were awarded 
indi\ idually h\ Dr. Lovett. assisted hy Dr. \\ eis- 
cr. u lici rea<l the names, and l)v Dr. (Caldwell. » ho 
droppeil on the hood significant of the degree 
taken. ( )ne hundred and sixty one were awarded 
the degree of Haelielor of Arts. The degree of 
l^achelor of Science was attainetl by eight in 
( Ihiiiiical Engineering, three in (livil Engineering, 
eight in PJectrical Eiigineeriug, <'leven in Mech- 
anical Engineering and one in Architecture. One 
student was awartled the degree of Electrical 
Engineer, fifteen gained the Master of Arts degree, 
and four the degree of Doctor of I'hilosopln . 
Among these last was Miss Deborah May llickey, 
the lirsl woman ever to receiye a Ph. I), from the 
Institute. \s the last degree was conferred. Dr. 
l.oNcll pronounced u|)on the graduate^ the tra- 
ditional llomeiic Huliric of fiicc. 

The scholarshi]! awards for the coming year 
\\rrv ue\t announced, and with the singing of 
\merica the foiirleenth annual coininencement 
came to a close. Ihcre is a simple dignity aliout 
these ceremonies uhich a >enior can ne\er forget. 




'•< • Li 



TiiK ^iixTii i<:.\4a.\i:i<:iti.\4ii *iiio\v 

The Enfiiiii'criii^ Show «;i> lnriii;ill\ ()|icrii'(l <iii 
Friilav. April tin- ciglilfcnth. when \la\iir W ahcr 
E. Moiiteilli cut the l)hic ami f;ra\ rihhiins llial 
hancil tilt- ua\ to the Kiiiiincrr iui; Huildiiif; anil 
thcicliv released a ehister of halloons iarr\ iii^ an 
in\ itatioii to the sli(i\\ . 

This year tlx^ >liou \>a^ li\ far the lar;;<-.-l ami 
most eom|)|ete that has e\er heeii held on the 
earnpus. and it was eharaeteri/.ed by an ininsually 
large iimnher of individual dis|)lavs. 

Klaliorate plans were carrietl out to in<rease the 
|ialr(His' enj(i\ merit. Refreshments and ehair~ 
were |iro\ided. and all the details attendant to 
parking in eoiinested areas were eliminated li\ an 
efficient jiarking departuK'nt. PlKie were ap- 
jjioximatelv lwenl\ thousand \isitors. 

The exhiliits consisted of dis|)la\s of the ei|uip- 
ment used in the \ arions engineering and science 
courses, and demonstrations of the students" 
work. Of especial interest were a model oil \\ell 
and the denionstralion of dry ice. Phe hooch 
analysis was another drawing card. 

I'hose in charge of the show were as follows: 
Kgerton S. Kohl), general manager. W ilhnr 
Wright. ,lr.. program manager. William K. \ an 
/amlt. linaucial manager. Lee llaruie Johnson, 
puhlicitx manager. K. K. I'errin. Jr.. display 
manaiier. I)aii Memlell. Iraihc mariau<T. I)ick 





^ ancey. manager of the Ivl',. d<>part- 
ment. .1. .S. Hale, managei of the CE. 
department, (ilenn llodgsin. mana- 
ger of the M.E. department. Lemuel 
l!eidim\. manager of the ( Ih. L. de- 
partnienl. Kudolph \\ eichert. mana- 
ijer of the |)hysics ilepartment. Larl 
Koeppe. manager of the architectural 
ilepartment. \'^ . ('. Brown, manager 
of the hioliigv de|)artment. Louis 
Kosenherg. manager of the psychol- 
ogy department. Thtimas R. Moore. 
manager ol the economics dcparl- 
ment. Al Korhes. assistant manag<'r 
of the E.E. department, .lolin Haile\ . 
assistant manager ol the (l.l.. (!<■- 
partmeut. Iv W . Mct'arlhv. assistant 
manager ol the M.l'l. department. 
,1. M. Barron, assistant manager of 
the Ch.K department. 

'I'fif. I'lCTCllKS — Abc)\k: I^olili, Wrlizlil. \ iili 
/..iikII;— .IdIuisoii Fcriin. MiihIcII 

111 I : 'l;,ii..\, IImIi-, |-,,rli.-s. I I. i.l-s.in. li.-ri- 
lnii\: — ftiiilfy. MuDir, korppc. I'ruwn. I^os- 
rrilii-i;;. 



'^BLu£^ 


1 


¥ 


1 


^ 


n 


b£M^^ 


1 


^k 


1^ 




I 




■ 


m 


1 


& 


J 


ra 




B 


^HsT^ 






. -'i^. .3 















I 



C:£:-:. 




SALLYPORT 




.'; r% 



'."^ fc. ^ T L J_ 




'I'll.- Mlcvl rni.,>.,l,lr .!,,>,, .il Ihi- \.-;li I'; .•sliiiii-ii .'li li'[i;iill Thlrslii-I lll;lk.•^ ils lirsl |-,-i,sl I a I loll il.l> M|l|i,Mr 



|i|i,MrMii.i-. 



n : 



W ^BK -^ 



I I IP 




The Freshiucn flfl llirir-^ — ihiiicIi on 'I'ils.!;! y. r;i//. un l'nil;i> Kiii^ I ;iiilHiili:M]^ iiml l'r.'\\ \oi iIk nil «ilh moll;. 



i 




M:i> Ki-lc. 1929— Like nil liiic Miiy Felos, lliis w;rs orn' ol' iiiisiir|i,iss;il>lc li,:iiii> C.l.'o iiwulc Mil iriiniitalilo jester 



tir'i-''- 




How they loaf: Bulletin board Hido moochers?!! Taking the sun. Big Gainhlors, Three strays. Two wlio don't loaf. 




\ri\ r...>ll.;iil LMriM' l'.\ cr \ I Ihiil: Int.- I>iiI Xij-ficr J;ick. Cilpliiiii .li.ii,-s. Ilii- IlilMrMi.in Trrroi. in ii rnildi-r niDiiiinl. 



'■4 . a J L. . — 




Sonir' champions: lljiTlber;;. Hraccy, Leelaml. ( aanz: .sonic sprthilurs; and tin- uri'at Dr. ( !a\ lord .lohiison, linaiHicr 




Tlic Aiitry House: Kspl;in;i<i»' roses and "Town, jileaso?'" Club room, male room, tlie Hostess, Campanile pictures. 




All over thecaniiiiis— Olierle. (L. L.) Psychologists see hypnotism. (L.R.) Thfti Mrs. Morris took Doc Morris out. 




Il..lllr lilV ,,r lllr KHMl-,!.. 



Ihrir hiii>. I)(mI-<' iwilli lii^lili i> sc'i'kiiii: iiol ;iii lioni'sl ]ii;in liiil Ills p^iril 



A 




All llicsi' piclurcs were posi-d lor llir ( '.;inip;iiiili' I'xcc^pt lln" one in rrTilcr, Tlu'sr hoys tlou'l ever drink or fratnhh- 





Junior 



The old Siillyport lud j;cinie. Got a <1<i1I;m IxiIIktui^' you? The j,'fnllii[i;iii lnhitii| I In- ilcsk will ifliuvc you of tluit. 



.. N ... 



m 



i Vf- 




These are the people who buy the bids from the fellows boiiirHl the desks. Backbone of the scliool — God bless "eni! 



i ', .\ 



.¥. 



jM w%. ^ ns .^ iM. 




(Illlc'l ^iil.' ..I llir lariJlMI I. .JIlh.lM.'lMli's 



ilr i.I;m'<'s .>! riil.'rl.uiiliicril . Mi!.^ Co!,^ Mili-lilljirs ;j 






ITIM 




Dllly lii.l(l<;, Kiii--lii;;li: Ml. .less.' .IijTi.s; loo s»x-.-t lor words; Boh.iiii:ui ; Mmi>Ii;iII ;iI il: hikes ;i loll-, lull. etc.;H. 



n "1 




Ti)p:Rlioili's Cum. ^H(U loin: Riisiiicss Mgr. ;ioes Riil li'-> : Ass I. hlflilor txiu-<. (Ir.iiii.i tii- IMilor goes cnizy (no! illus.) 



i : .\ ^ S 



.,.!•; 



* r> ''■ "■ 




nrubliounds— Soci;ii. prulVssional. and onliiuiry f^arden variety. Smokey wins Irophy. Hairyears on a big milk jag. 

[ V ■ 



L 1 M L J V 




PALlimlliloulul,-.. ll S.'.-II1> ll...-()\\ LSIiMci ^il»>lll lIliriN l>\,;{i^,-~ I ;i .Inlir,- \l ;n sli,,ll :j.-Im, I,., I ,,ii,- 1] ,,]ii lll.-Oul. 




Plcnl> ol li;ii,l «,,ik li.r,,!.- iIm-iI;i.kc's. Theysay lliiil Riiiiic'ciwmI lor wlial .lulii'l. Spollislil W rifjlit and LiUli- Hig 



i' I 



-\ »m -^ 




Initiations: Engineers brouRlit dogs; I lie (JWLS wore ba tiling suits; liiil look at tlic Arcliiti'cts! Now il' tlie OWLS . 

»£■■ fih 



^; 1^5 




WondiTsol' llii' Eiif;iiii'i'iiiif; Show: \\ iiol'iis; Sidrir ;iii(l lii^'li spii-rl saw; KriKl.iM's iiwii l('li'S(0|ii'; Alrhemist 's Di'ri. 




Mayor Monteilli culs ttio lihboiis; ( '.hrmisls (Iciiiunslrjilc dry ice; Miss SiuiLh represeuts Eco; C. E.'s build hcidyes. 



"^ -V. 




■•-.■. ~TK%S1 



c-*^^ 



I I- 



f] 



U^ IW •. J . 







-■V^aulewpf-. 



SOCIETY 




.;:) fifv, 




.1 i/rnn-iilin- pkiquc rcpn'sriiliiitf llir 
Siiiril of Engineerimi 

Iv.X^IXKKICV ItALL 

Tile social >caM>ii nn llic Kici' caiii- 
pus was IdiiiialK ip|>('iie(l liv (he Kn- 
ginecrs' Daiici-. ;:i\cii at River ( >aks 
Countrx ( ,\u\< on llic nifilit of Ndveiii- 
bei" llie ilc\ cnlli. Siiii[)lieit\ ciiarac- 
terized llic dccoialioiis. Kulmislic 
plaques iM'presenting the ijiflcreiu 
schools ol llic Kiigineeiiiig Dcparl- 
inent ucre pla<eil at vantage points 
aliout llic ualls anil eiiipliasized ii\ 
nni([ue ligliling eflecl>. \ large elec- 
tric sign licaring llic uonl hiiiiiiKir^ 
winked alio\e ilie ilidi house. 

The croud lurried out en masse lor 
the first "lorrual' ol the vear. and a 
spirit of fri\olit> pervaded the whole 
affair. 

Music was furnished hv the Seven 
Jacks orchestra till twelve, when 
Lee's Owls look Ihe ll,M,r. \ hulTci 
supper was ser\ ed al iiiidnlglil. and 
dancing was slopped in lime to make 
eight o clocks, l{a^nlond Stone was 
chairman of the affair. 



TIIK 4>. W. I.. S. 4 4»I.4».MAI. I»A.X4 E 

The (>\\i'n \\ ister l,ilerar\ Soci<-tv set a prec- 
edent when they honored their sixteen pledges 
with a formal dance at liiver Oaks Country Club 
on the evening of November twentv-seventh. 

\ (Colonial theme uas featured in the di'cora- 
liou> and the luanv iduples who attended danced 
in a l\pieall\ southern atmosphere. \t the far end 
of llic' ballroom could be >ccn a randding planta- 
lioii horui' on a grassv terrace, and arbors over- 
run «ith srnilax and blooming roses lined the walls. 
\n old l)ark\ opened llic while jiicket gate that 
s<'paral<'d ihe ballroom from the promenade and 
(iresented the guests with jtrograms in which each 
dance was named in honor of a |dedge. \n addi- 
tional note of effectiveness was lent b\ the cabin 
where a negro mammv lold fortunes ihroiiglioiit 
llie r\ cning. 

\t iiiid-iiight a chicken diiiu<-r was served in the 
grillroom, after which dancing was resumed until 
two o'clock. Music was furnished hv Steve (^ard- 
ner of Texas Universitv . 

Plans for the dance were handled li\ Misses 
Mariann Adkins. Mary Klizabeth Tisdale. Ahne 
I'eekham and Marv llallie Herry. The decora- 
tions were in charge (d Miss Josi'phine Berryman. 

■/'/;.■ II U ./, N lilrihirs. Ill irliiisr linniir lllf ililliec tnis <lhva 




T H K: I*. A. L. >». S I* O II T l» A X K 

Jt is the ciisloni nf llie Pallas Athene Literary 
Society to give a daiiee eacli year to raise fmiils 
for a scliolarship wliieli is aiiniiall\ awarded to a 
woman student of ihe Insliliile. This \ear the 
soeiel\ took on the a(hle(l task ol attempting to 
finance a conlriliution to the Hand I niform I'und. 

Tlie danc(> took |iLice on the night of March 
ihirty-lirst at the L niversitv (Ihd). Ihe theme was 
in the form of a sport affair, and tennis rackets 
and tea tables with hright colored awnings were 
used as decorations. The dancers came in s|iorl\ 
attire, and from umh'rneatli the cano|>\ thai c()\ - 
ered the orchestra platform came music that 
seemed inspired hv the gay atmosphere. For once 
the orchestra ])latform had heen made attractive. 

Dancing continued hdm nine till two. ami the 
mnsic was furnished h\ the .Stephens-Parish (Or- 
chestra. There was plenty of time to slee|) late 
next morning, for \|>ril first is a traditional Kici- 
holiday — but the dance was no April Fool riiallir. 
The crowd was just right. 

Edythe Westerfield was the general chairman. 
Martha Stewart. Rowena Macl.aughlin. Anne 
Heyck. Mary Lou Moore, and llomoiselle lladeii 
had charge ol suh-conmiit lees. 





Tkk nr:i ki\in<; li^'i-: — righl I" Irll- !,>nri Kus 
tcr. Nancy Fiirbcs, Dorolhy I'..! Ii;iii\ . Mar- 
l.oil COSS. Kllylho WcsltTlic-lil. I.iilir I'.lak.- 
Maiiail Cookr. Hotlloisi-lli- llail.ii 



i:\ti<:k-litkiiaiiv 
^»4M ii<:tv TIv\ 

Soon aller the lieginning of school. 
Ihe F.H.L.S.. I'.X.F.S.. and the 
I t.W .L.S.. acting in conjuiKlion. gave 
a lea in honor of the new girls. The 
reception was held at \utry House 
from lour lo :-i\ In llie allcrnoon. 
( Xlicers of the three societies consti- 
tuted the receiving line, and Mrs. 
Fugene lilake and Mrs. Sara Strat- 
ford poured lea. Thi' room was 
heautifulK decorated with Mowers. 

The reception is an annual affair 
gi\eM to inlroduce the new girls to 

ll Id members of the literary .so- 

ciclies. Those girls arc irnited who 
are consiilcred ]irospe<ls lor meni- 
hers. and from these the pledges of 
ihcliterarv societies are chosen. Meni- 
bership status is attained onl\ after 
pledges have fullilled ci'riain scholas- 
tic requirements. 




TUB ri{A.\>IKR ILI It 
V.\IJ-:.\TI.\K l»A.>4 K 

\iiti\ lloMM' was again the scrnr 
(il llif aiiMiial \ iilciitine Dance o;i\cii 
1)V (/raniiicr ( iliili im the riighl <<( I'ch- 
riiar\ fduileenlh. 

The tradilional \ aleiitine coIdis 
were carried oiil in the decoralions. 
and the mom was gaily luiiig with 
red and wliile streamers from whicli 
were ^u^ipi pided cnpids. bows and 
arrows and hroi^en liearts. Colored 
halliM>n> added lo ihe effect. 

Sornelhiiig of liie old Rice spirit 
was caught on Valentine night. It 
may have heen the limited crowd i>r 
the fact that the dance was on "the 
old stomping grounds'" hut it came 
as a ileliglillul surpris<'. whatever the 
reason. 

Ihe music u a> lurui^hcd li\ Ke^s- 
lers l{iiiiil)l<is. a well known local 
orchestra. The dance lasted from '> 
to 12. and Hex White was in charge 
of tile arrangements. 



T II K KAI.LV 41.111 IIAX'li: 

A change in the foothall schedule which placed 
the last game of the season on the Saturday fol- 
lowing Thanksgiving caused the changing of the 
aiiiuial KalK (Huh Dance from the customary 
hreak-training affair on Thanksgiving night to a 
midwinter formal on .januarv tenth. The varsity 
foothall stpiad and the cro.ss coiuitrv team were 
guests (d honor, just as lhe\ ha\ e heen in the |>ast. 

I he (lance was held in uui(pie surroimdings — 
the hall was that famous road house. Loma Linda. 
Decorations and light control there are so fine and 
coTnplete that no special decorations were al- 
lempti'd. Much color was given by the lights that 
|p|a\ed constanth across the ceiling. 

( )ne thing marred the e\eiiing. [t was bitter 
cold. A norther had blown in. and heating ar- 
rangements for till' hall were not quite adequate 
to disperse the chill. IJut guests danced gailv on 
in evening wraps, thrilled at the novel turn the 
affair had taken. And what matter if the praiseil 
chickcn-a-la-king and nnich needed coffee had 
likewise been affected by the cold! The the usual 
l{allv Club atmosphere was lacking, the dance 
was acclaimed the best the club had ever spon- 
sored. 

Music was fmnished bv a colored orchestra, 
77ic 7('-vn;i,s. 







«l 


m 


H~ 








W\ 


jHy 


^^MjBBpHFTfflfe - 




m 


*^K 


Hi^^hJ%^^ .-^H^-^ d 


^ 1 " '^!^^ 


\ ~ 


-t£*^ii|i 


Ifek f^tf^^flES 


^^^^R* . - r.-M^Wl^k'' 


KoHJ^f^ 




-^jp 1 


W\ ' iHI . ?^H^H 


I^HE^ ~Uf nL 




Sc ' 


*^K^j^ 


. Jm ;. VU 


L^r ^^^^^^^ < 




ft 


■1 


1^ a 
















^' -f 


'^S 


IL 


^H 


^H /■ 








Wi 


Hli 


^B : vl 






ur ;-. u.; -^^ um 



TIIK .11 XKMt l*KO>l OK I » :i O 

Tlie Junior Prom was held at Ki\or Uaks on 
tlie night of February the twenty-eighth and 
marked the beginning of spring activities on the 
Campus. The customary aihnittance charge of 
seven dolhirs and liflv cents ])roved (piite a stum- 
bling block to man\ would-be participants, and 
until midnigiit. when the doors were thrown open 
to tlie slags, tlie affair resendiled a couple dance — 
with not so many couples. Tiiere was also lacking 
something (d the Prom s usual formalil\. 

(ruests danced in thi' nnslic realms of the deep 
l)lue sea (piite unbarmed b\ the nivriads of sbarks. 
octopuses and sword-lisb llial darli'd b\ . and a 
final toucb was added bv the sunken Spanisb gal- 
leon and the sinuous mermaids that graced the 
walls of the ballroom. The climax (d ibe decora- 
tive scheme was a billow \ cano](\ o( sea-blue 
which covered the leiling in undulating fashion, 
and gave tbe decorator's im|)ression of how the 
waves look from the bollom side. Hill Mmpin 
was the general chairman of the dance. 

At eleven thirty President .Take lle.ss and Vice- 
President \ irginia Kced li'il the iumpain in a 
grand marcli, and inunedialeU afterwards a sup- 
per was served tlial smacki-d strongK of I be sea. 





TIIK S4»l>IIO.>IOItl<: i».\.vrK 

Ibe .Sopbouiorc lUdl was lield tbis 
\ear on ibe e\ cuing ol I'idiruarv 
sixth and came as a fitting celebra- 
tion of till- Icrminalion of I'xams. Tbe 
roull was one of llic most ciiii>\ablc 
dances (d I lie \ car. 

(ililtcring mounds of snow, huge 
dangling icicles, the glow of tbe famed 
Aortbern Lights, and everytbing rem- 
iniscent of the far \rclic /one was 
Iraiisplaiili'd uilliiu llic ualls id ibc 
spacious River ( )aks liallrooui. Jhe 
decorations were unusuall) artistic. 

Henry Annan and bis Wic ) (irkrrs 
furnished tbe music thru out the e\c- 
ning. At twelve o'clock refreshments 
were ser\ cd in tbe novel form of an 
"Kskimo supper. " and at its tcrmina- 
lion dancing was resumed till tbe wee 
small hours of the morning. 

The dance was planned by Keiiben 
Mbaiigb. ( iliris Pope. Maurii'c Kall- 
nian and I'ritz 1 (art. 



<! 




Mr. a. ,1. lvi.lU.)E A-Mi Ail,s.s AlAilJOlUE iSlCK^ 

AIK lll-AICTS IIAIJ. 

Fanlas^ riileil mi I he iiij;lil ol Kcli- 
riiarv l\v(>nlv-ln>l at llic \rilii- \il> 
Ball. giMMi aninialK li\ llic \i(hl- 
tectural Soeictx and cacli \i'ar llir 
most colorl'iil rsciil (if tlio Rice smial 
caleiKlar. I hi> \(ar a Sclieli(>ia/.ailian 
Fanla^v \\a> iliiiM-ri a> llic M'lliiij;. 
and llic dccoralidiis «crc [icrliaps llic 
nii>sl clalioratc and colorlnl tlial have 
c\ci- liccn used. I )c(()iati\ c |panid- 
cuNcrcd llic vslicilc wall s|)acc of tlic 
Ri\ci- ( )ak> lialliiiciiii. c(in\ crliii^ il 
iiihi a |M(liirc>i|iic I'crsian garden. 
Ilij;li >hiiic ualls (i\cilninj; uilli liiil- 
lianlK lined Oriental flo\vci>. ^in- 
roiindcd llic jjardcii. and lic\oiid llic 
ualU cdiild lie >ccn iirolCMiuc Irces 
Iroin wliicli |iccreil \^eii(l lialldiiiniaii 
genii. 

\ Icinj: cliii.-ler Mi|i|iiirli'il li\ ;;racc- 
Inl Saracenic cnlnniii^ iiriianiciilcil 



llw far end ol the hallrooiii. and hoin this could 
lie M'cn ihe Dream ("aslle — an idealistic struelnre 
ol inarhle Inrrelsand gilded niinarels nestled high 
among snow -ca|i|ied niounlains. 

In keeping «itli this lieautiful setting were the 
clahorate costumes worn bv the guests. Harem 
girls clad in shimmery. transparent trousers danced 
willi heavily bearded sheiks: a Chinese couple 
niiiigled with the throng: maids from medie\al 
fair\ tales strolled h\ in llowing rohes: the Jack of 
Hearts. Romeo, and the (Joldcn Knight lent an 
air ol romance: hut all was momentarilv silenced 
u hen a imsterious ligiire ol Death llitted in and 
<int among the laughing couples. 

\n outstanding event of the evenings enler- 
lainment was a solo dance hv Miss Vesev of Waco, 
sister of Francis \ esev of the Architettinal So- 
cict\. The dancer ca|)tivated in costume and 
iiio\ement thi' s|>irit ol a light-hearted slave girl 
in llie streets of old Bagdad. 

Kefreshments were in the form of a Persian 
supper, served at midnight and consisting of ciir- 
r\ft{ rice, dates and olives. Dan<-ing continued 
until three o'clock in the morning, and the music 
u as furnished h\ the Stephens Parish Orchestra. 

llie dance was under the general manageinent 
ol \. ,1. KcIkx'. president of the Architectural So- 
(■icl\. Karl Koeppe was in cliargi' of the decora- 
tions. 




I 



r 



SATLRWAV XK^HT IIAX !<:>« 

The traditional Satiii(la\ night danfes. si) loni; 
a vital part of tlie college life at Rice, attraeted 
reeord crowds lliruoul tlie year, and ihe inlor- 
mality that has characterized them in the past 
was again a main drawing card. Stags have heen 
steadih on the increase, uuich to the delectation of 
the co-eds. an<l il jpossihle occnpied more space 
than ever hefore. 

Bnt the character of the crowd gave rise to 
complainls. The dances were often not really 
Rice dances at all. bnt the gathering place of an\ 
and every body who was out for a Saturday night "s 
enterlainment. (jollegiate high school youths were 
particularJN in evidence. Tiic Dance ('onunitlee 
had little luck in coping with the situation. A bid 
system was inanifurated. but the unwillingness of 
the sturlents and members of the University (!lub 
to abide by tlie new rules made it a mere gesture. 

But the dances iiad to be moved to a larger ball 
than Autry House, and altlio the dances were 
often referred to as "brawls."" the same crowd 
came week after week, and whenever they hear 
again the strains of /"// .Sec } on In Mv Drenius. 
memories of the happiest dances of the year will 
return. 

I.rr\ (lirla (In-lu-sin, 



m 



M 


!■ 


1 


m 


k. 


''\''''. 


1 


m 


w 


SIIBHK^^H 


II 


*( 


P,r 


LAW 




. Y-vw^ 


#-- 






■LV-,-;-. ' 




.4 SiiltirddV nif/lit diinre in progress 

KA.xn ii.v.xrK 

The Rice ()ul Band were hosis at 
a dance gi\en on ,lamiar\ 22 at tiie 
L niversity Club. The receipts went 
to the Band Uniform Fund, and 
Lee's (_)wls played witlionl charge, 
while the University (Jlub contribut- 
ed the use of the hall. But ihe near- 
ness o{ examinations, coupled with 
tlie fact that it was <ine of the coldest 
nights of the year, made the crowd 
disapjiointingly small. Nevertheless, 
ariiuiKJ s20(l profit was realized. 

Fitii:sii.>i.\> i>ir>ir 

\biMil line hundred and fift\ Kresh- 
nien engaged in the annual boal ride 
of the class. Sylvan Beacii was 
reached by way of the good sinp 
Nicholas at five o'clock, and the t'om- 
panv engaged in swiriuning and danc- 
ing till eight thirty. Tlie trip home 
began with a picnic supper, and end- 
ed in whatever people dn wbcii re- 
tMrniiii; hdin a picnic. 



r ^ "^ 




m \*--*^ y ^ 4 







D K A M ATI C S 



T 



<> ^ ■t t^ 



li * I'll J Hi J 



THE HICK HK VMATlt ll.l K 



THE PICTURES 



Top: Williams, Taylor, Lewis. 



Bottom: Crawford, Scott, Sniilli 





OFFICERS 

Helen Williams President 

Charles Reece Taylor I ice-President 

Carmen Lewis Secretary 

CoRRTNE Crawford Treasurer 

Jack Scott Memher-at-hiriie 

Lee Bowen Faculty Adrisor 

Tlif ninth season of (he Riee Dramatic Ckih 
openeil with a revival of interest under the 
leariersliip of Helen Williams, iirst girl to he 
president of the club. The club underwent al- 
most complete reorganization and emerged 
one of the most prominent activities on the 
cam])us. It reap<'d the rich harvest of its 
previotis eight years of struggle, and bids fair 
to remain in the course of progress. 



The three major productions main- 
tained a high level both in literarv worth 
and in acting, and in addition to these the 
club offered a tournament of one act plays 
free to the public. The Palace Theater 
was rented, and in it the club left the 
bonds of amateurishness whi<h iield it 
back in high school auditoriums. 

Perhaps the most valuable of the club's 
activities was the experimental work done 
in the one act plays presented at the regu- 
lar club meetings. Both direction and act- 
ing was d(me by students, and each one 
discovered new talent. The club was able 
to take in nineteen new active members 
and has an enrollment of about forty 
probationarv members, making the en- 
tire membership around seventy. 

The organizati(m was extremely for- 
tunate in securing the friendship of James 
Harry Smith, English instructor, who not 
only directed the three major productions 
with skill, but advised the club in nuich 
of its program. The inauguration of the 
yearly one act play contest was upon his 
suggestion. Dr. Howen. as faculty ad- 
visor, rendered the club valuable service. 



r 




riiaili' a rhariiiiiiij: (iweii, Joe (iarza and 
(lanni'ii Lewis as llorbert Dean, tlie fad- 
iii>; arlor. and Ids wife. \\ Intnev l{eader 
and I'.rlc Kaulins. as the less artistic lovers 
1)1 the \<inn^ ('aM'iidisli uiinien. uhose 
codI eves lor liusiness were in lialanie witli 
llie rash tern|ieraTnenl of the lainiK . Mar- 
ian Seaman and liarr\ Hlooiii In Id iin|por- 
lant servant roles: minor parts were lilled 
h\ Pnr\ear Minis. Mar\ Belle i'erkins 



THK II4»VAI> FA3III.V 

The Riee Dramatic Chih opened a \erv 
successful season with the clever |ila\. 
Tlif Royal I'diiiilv. written l)\ the well- 
known (ieorge Kanlfman and Kdna Fer- 
ber. In every respect this production was 
among the best that the club has ever 
given. It was presented at the Palace 
Theater on the nights of Noveiidier 2\ 
and 22 and for a matinee on the 22nd. to 
large and enthusiastit- audiences. It was 
under the able and talented direction of 
James Ilarrv .Snntli of the Knglish De- 
partment, and he is to be congratulated 
for the choice and de\elo|(ment of the 
cast. 

The pla\ is e\identl\ a satire on the 
Barrvinore-Drew fannlv. and required 
the cast to maintain the remarkable pace 
of a faniiU of tem[ieraniental actors. The 
acting honors must be divided chieflv 
among Uealrice Harrison, wlio portraved 
"the greatest Lady Maclieth of her dav" 
in the character of Fannv Cavendish. 
James Lane Parker, who handled the dif- 
ficult role of the (Jerman theatrical mana- 
ger of the famiU with ease. Mthea Mill, 
who made a perfect Julie, and Bill Lee. 
who actiuillv (Cf/.s the dashing Tonv. Less 
important roles, but <'ipiall\ as pleasing, 
were carried bv Marv Tallichet. who 




Jerr\ killar<l- Kd Forbes, and ( Iharles Nathan, 
riie success of this production rested as 
much with the evcellent stage force as with 
the cast, and it was managed by F. K. Ken- 
nedv. The assistant stage manager was Pau- 
line Sternenberg. These two were helped bv a 
large force including Farnsworth Calhoun. 
Fd Forbes. Jerrv Lillanl. .|o Heth (Trillin, and 
manv other loyal nuMubers of the club. '\s a 
result, the setting was a real merit to the club, 
and the audience recognized this with a round 
of applause as the curtain was raised. 

The financial results enabled the club to 
carry the plav to Beaumont for two per- 
formances on December 12th. There were 
two changes in the cast. Jack Scott taking 
Frie Rawlins" part and (^harles Recce Taylor 
taking Ilarrv Bloom's. Those two witc un- 
able to make the trip. 



ik'i r.^ .' I'-t 






Ci^ 



.\i>.>iiic.\iii.i-: 4 itiriiT4».\ 

li\ I'iir the iiKisI ainl)itioiis of llie 
\c;ii> |iro(lii(iiim> wa.- I lie tdiiiii- 
iililc ('riihlcii |j\ Sir Jariic^ liarrii'. It 
is (Ik- most diHicull plav in Ixilli act- 
inj; and sla^iini; \cl altrniptcil li\ llic 
clnli. It uas pn'M'ntrd at llic I'alacc 
riicairt' on M anii 2(i. 27 and l!!i. u illi 
a iiialini'f (in the llTtli. Mi'. SiTiith 
dii<'(ti'd llii^ |ii'i>dii('li(in. aUii. and it 
is no ('as\ matter to tMlncatc a cast (d 
American college slndents to an Knf^- 
lisli accent as «as neeessaiv in lliis 
case. Despite some verv dillicidt 
iliaiactcf transitions and still more 
dillicnll changes (d sccner\. the per- 
formance was more polished than the 
iisnal amatenr- pi'ex'iitation. liou- 
c\cr. the andienci'- took to HarrieV 
huriior more than to his thesis, ami 
main of his sidilleties were lost. 

Jack .^c<ill. in the leading ni.di' role 
ol ( aichton. ga\e a strong inteipreta- 
tioii and «as ca>il\ the star id the 
pla\. rile iie\l most important pari, 
that ol' Lad\ Mar\. was s|dendidlv 
carried li\ l,a\oiic I )ickcn-lieet>. llic 
character part id Lord Loam was \ct 
another laurel lor .lames Parker. « ho 
is imdoiililcilK the chill s most \crsa- 
tile actor. Kouena \li Laugldin.etpial- 
Iv as (lever, took the jiart of Tweenex . 
The parts of l.aih Mars'- \oiiiiticr 
sisters. ( '.atlieriiic and \gatlia. were 
\\i-\\ filled li\ Martha Stewart and 
Allliea Hill, and the cousin. Karnesl. 



Ii\ Lewis A. Smitii. 'Phe remaining major parls 
were carried bv Scoll Lee Ilild as the Reverend 
Treherne. Herbert Bollfrass. as Lord Brockle- 
hiirsl. and Marv Margaret Brown, as the Countess 
Drocklehurst. Verv minor roles fill out the e\- 
trcmcN large cast ol tweiitvdi\c members. 

Mr. I'.dward \. Vrrants of the architectural 
dcpartmi-iil designed and sn]iervised tlie execu- 
tion ol the three dillicidt sets rcipiircd. and be is 
to he congratulated on them, d he second set was 
particniarlv ingenious, being an outdoor scene 
on a desert island, and the palm trees against a 
darkening sea were strangeK realistic. Fie was 
ahl\ assisted bv F. K. Kennedv. .lerrv Lillard. Kd 
lorhcs. Klip Calboun. I'auline Sternenberg. Chris- 
tine I'ope. .Tack Brown. .John L. llannon. Charles 
Mercer, and others. Not onh was the construction 
of the sets most dinieult. but rapid changes be- 
tween acts necessitated great skill on the part of 
the stage force. ( )n the last night ol the production 
till' curtain remained up while the scene was shift- 
ed hctueen the third and lourtli acts. 

The inalter of costuming was also a difficult 
|)rol)lem solved in the hands of {{eatriee Harrison. 
Kosita Cevanes. ami Marv Belle Perkins. Ml In 
all. the club max consider this production a 
notable pla\ creililabl\ done. 




i 



I 



THE <»>E ATT I'LAV T O .\ T K S T 

V new sclieine was inauguraleil in llir dianialir 
(lull tlii> -ca^on uilli llic |ir'<>ilniii<>n iil (inc ail 
plavs iniilir I lie iliieetion ol ilnb nieniliers. riieir 
easts were u^-Mallv enniposeil of lieeler nienilier- 
wild were uorkiii;; toward probatiDnership. The 
pla\> were never rehearsed over three or four 
times and. eonseipieiitiv. perleetion was not their 
aim. Their merit rested in the diseoverv of new 
talent, both in acting and in (hreelinj;. \ltlioiii;li 
facilities for such workshop plavs have never been 
at the clnhs disposal, these one act |)lavs liave 
served as eonstriietiv(> experimental work. Some 
ol these |ila\s wliieli were ol nniisiial uorlli ui'ri' 
'I'lic Eliilihh' Ml. lidiiiis. directed b% \lar\ Mar- 
garet Hrowii. II iirzill-lliiiiiiiicr\. directed h\ 
(ienevieve Pvle. and Suppn'sscd Desires and 
Stralegv. both imder the direction ol Mtliea Hill. 
The success ot these one act plavs led the club 
later in the vear to present a series of them in a 
contest. This ociiirred on the altiMiioon and e\e- 
ning of Fehriiarx I I at \utr\ IIoum-. The presenta- 
tion was ol an iiilormal social nature, and tea was 
ser\ed in thi' card room during intermissions. 

The coin|ietition was thrown open to all Kice 
students, and the patrons were iiniled lo partici- 




pate. The judges were Allen \ . I'edcii. 
Professor (Griffith Evans. Leslie Duf- 
ton. Professor Alan D. MiKillo]). and 
Miss Marv Vi aldo. Kighl plavs were 
pre-enled: lour in the afternoon and 
tour in ill"' e\eiiiiig. Included were 
the follouing: I'iki Dollars Please, 
directed b\ ,lulia Kicker: Riisalind \)\ 
.losepli (iarza: I'Acaing Dress liiilis- 
pi'nsahle. b\ Beatrice Harrison; llalj 

ta llaur. b\ Mtliea Hill: The Dark 
IjiiIv. Ii\ Mrs. L. \. Mott-Smith: In 

I Moriiue. by Pat Lillard: 77,c / al- 
iaiil. b\ llarrv Bloom: and The Olil 
Lailv Slioirs Her Meilnls. b\ Mar\ 
and I'av Ktta llutton. 

The judges awarded the pri/,<- of 
liftv dollars to lb.- ca,-t of The Old 
Lailv Slious Her Medals, and Bea- 
trice Harrison was judged tiie best 
iridividuai perlormer lor her uork in 
this pla\. 1 he I alianl Has gi\eii sec- 
ond inenlioii and its cast of three. 
Marshall Ferguson, llarrv Bloom, 
and Sam Miller. recei\ed honorable 
mention. The judges also mi'iitioiieil 
Kichard Pelitfils in the winning pla\. 
and Patrick (,>uiiui in Treninii Dress 
liidis[>ens(d)le. More than HOO ])eople 
visited these pla\s and thus the club 
decided to make the (loiilcst a |parl 
of its regular \earl\ program. 

( )ne plav of particular interest was 
|iiesenled alti'r llic coulcsi. This uas 
.liiliv an lie Sim il nh de l.ineil. direct- 
ed b\ kallir\n Se\ mour. a patroness, 
and written h\ her brother. Hume 
Si'\mour. It was deeidedlv dillercnt 
in being a negro tragedv. and its three 
dinicult roles were handli'd hv Helen 
\\ illiams. Jack Scott, and Karns- 
\sortli ( lalhoun. The accompain iiig 
photo shows its cast. 



TIIK 4HK *:>*>» III >iUA.M» 

For ils lliird piiMluction. tlif Dra- 
iiiatic ( !liil( Id lulled to "ro\alt\'" 
uitli riir (JiKin s llushmiil. This is 
Kohoil liiiiiiicti Siieiwood's d(dif;lil- 
fiil satire a^iaiiist royalty in j;eiieral. 
and llie (^tiieeii <>l Koiiniaiiia in par- 
liciilai'. and il is Idled with comedy 
and a |>lol wliieli eliarnied its audi- 
ences. Mllio lliis was the least diffi- 
cult <>r llie season s productions, it 
was a wise choice lor a s])ring liili. 
and it -iasc lh<- \ear just tiie right 
finish. It is ri-c;relahle that the hoi 
weallu'r and spring weddings di- 
minished the aniliences. 

The |da\ was produced at the 
i'aiace I'liealer on May H. 4. and 10. 
under ihe consistently gooti direction 
of .lames Harry Smith. He has lieiMi 
a tireless and efficient director, and 
his <<>nlinued services have grealK 
aided in slahilizing the eluh. 

rile li'adiug roles of this ])la\ were 
carried li\ \lar\ Margaret Hrowiiand 
.James l.aiic Parker. The cinh has 
long wauled to star Parker in a pro- 
diK'lion. and that is wiiat iuippeneil 
ill 7 7/r (Juffiis linshtind. As usual. 
he ga\<- an excellent performance, 
this lime in the roll' of the king, who 
i.s sensihle enough iiol to meddle in 
llie affairs of the state and himiaii 
enough to delight in checkers, pen- 
guins, and hicvcle riding. Miss Brow n 
pla\e(l ihe pari of (_)neeii Martha, 
who is liaii<;lit\. domineeriii";, and 



uiireleiiliiig. Siie gives a splendid porlra\al ol a 
generalK iinsym))athetic part. 

Slightly less iin|)ortant roles were laken by 
( larinen Lewis, as the lovahle Princess \iin who 
wauled to run away from royalt\ : Jack Brown, as 
her adoring lover and secretary to the King; Pat 
l.illard. who gave a very commendahle perforiu- 
ance of Lord Birteii; and Purvear Minis, perfi'ct 
as the ''hhislering" (Jeneral Northru|i. Kour 
others deserve a great deal of credit for excellent 
work in short tlio difficult parts. These are Rhodes 
Duiilap. as Dr. FVIdman, Harold Bell W rigiit, as 
Laki'r. Korrest Lee Andrews, as I'riiice William, 
and .lerry Lillard. as f^hipps. Tho their work was 
less spectacular tiiaii the leads, it was just as es- 
sciilial in the production of the pla\. Minor 
characlers lia\e to come to rehearsals, just the 
same as major ones, liut they never get proper 
credit, and we are taking this opportunity to give 
llicm their due. 

The set. laid in the elaliorale stud\ of the King 
in the ro\al palace, is the work of flduard Ar- 
raiils. who matched if not exceeded his previous 
work with The Admirable Crichtoii. I'arnsworth 
( laiiioiin was stage manager and was assisted by 
(Miarlcs Mercer, John llannoii- .lack riirncr. and 
(iorimie (Crawford. Ihe most diflicidl stage effect 
was ihal of the noises of the revcdiilion in the 
second acl. but llie\ were made exIrcmcK ri'alis- 
lii'. 





H 


PJ" '"<^ 


|H|g| 






I 


^ ^ 


IP4 






1 






IM 


■M 




Kf 


M 




Htm 


hT "^Ml 




Km 


iMI^. 


i" 


m 






i 





I 



■^ m 



L K S F K >l M K S F 4» It T F S 

Tliis tlirer act coiiii-dv Ipv \ ictoricii Sardoii di- 
rected liv facullv sponsors. Viiilie 15oui{i;eois and 
(jardner Miller, was |)rcseiilcd on Decendier lOlli 
to more llian luii hmidred Kicc ^luilcnls and 
Hoiistonians. the largest audience ever gathered 
in Houston to witness a plav S])oken entireh in 
French. It was the higgest thing e\(r undertaken 
hy "Les Tlihoux." 

The plav. a clever criticism of modern vontli 
and \nierican education, was a splendid M'hicic 
for an excellent cast. Noelie Romero as (llaire 
gave a remarkahle hit of IVmininc acting. Mildred 
Kelly and Mozelle Aldis as (iahrielle and ,leun\ 
were sueeessivelv charming, unsopiiistica ted maid- 
ens, and mnestrained Mappers. Ruhv Bartine was 
a comical Miss D<'liorah. while (Irace Berling oh- 
tained an imnu'nse success as the eccentric Mme. 
Lahorie. Lavone Dickensheets as Mme. Toupart 
conipletelv dominated her husband. Mar\in 
Mickle. whose acting was marveloiislv realistic. 
A gracious lady's maid was Marv Belle Perkins. 
Kyle Morrow's gentli-manliness lit admirahlv the 
part of Ladhapellc. Noah Mayeux was an amus- 
ing prince. Messrs. Bourgeois and Miller, in the 
leading parts shared success as actors, and pro\ cd 
themselves excellent directors. 




The dramatic section of the Krencli 
(•lull was organized this year; 14 pa- 
trons and the mend>ers of committees 
helped to make a success of it. Pa- 
tron cliairinan: M. Stuart. Program 
conuuitlee: V. ()rdiug. (i. V\ liiti', 
Pnhlicitv: (',. Kelder. Stag<' manager: 
.1. (iar/.a. Properties: |{. Knminir. 

Besides Les Fennnes Fortes, five 
one-act plavs were presented during 
the vear: "Le lelour de Brnxellcs." 
' Le chat parti. Ic>. souiis dansent." 
'Par un iour de pluie," "Le petit 
Ullage and L e|)ren\ e dangereuse, " 
directed respecti\ cl\ li\ (i. Berling, 
\. (;. Bourgeois. J. (;arza. {',. Miller, 
and K. Morrow. Twenty-two mcm- 
hers of the <lul) hecanie acti\e mi'm- 
licrs ot the ilranialic section li\ tak- 
ing parts in plavs: Misses \L \ldis. 
K. Bartine. (;. Berling. L. Dicken- 
she.-ts. M. Kelly. \. Ording. M. B. 
Perkins. C. Pylc. N. Ueickert. N. 
Komero. M. Stuart. M. A. Stevens 
and L. Wade. Messrs. J. Brown. II. 
C.havamies. ,|. (iarza. .1. (Jordinier, 
N. Mayeux. M. Mickle. k. Morrow. 
(',. von .lohnson and K. \ on .Johnson. 

I he ilrainatic committee intemis to 
secure l(lt> palroii> to support tln' ef- 
forts of the .luh lor the year U):iO-31. 
It expects to offer: three groups of 
thrive one-act pla>s. and two three- 
act plavs. Th<'\ will he chosen from 
the best plavs of contemporarv 
French dramatists, produced in Paris 
theatres. 



□ 



I " 




PlJBLI€ATIO>S 



THE T II IC K S II E K 

rill-: I'icri i!i-:s 

Ttn': Sllonl^ I limes, 'ruriicr. 



ISotiom: Dfiiki-. (liirrcll. Soulc, 
lii'irv: Hill, P.Mliriviss. iMilliii. K.'l- 
iIit; .IiiIims,.!!, S.Ml.oiri; \Vi'l>l>, 
liuss.-ll. 





Elcclcd OJfm'rs 

TkI) ,'>iko\(; Editor 

KoiiKKT 1 1 iMKs Business Manager 

Elbert Tl k\kh Managinfi Editor 

l?ll.l,^ l{ I ssi;i,l, (ssislanl liiisincss Manager 

llili<iinl<il Stall 

li. S. I)i! vKi; Associate Editor 

l.SAAC (i\RRETT 4ssociate Editor 

<i\RDNER SOI'LE Sports 

\l \R\ II \ixiE Berry Society 

Aliiii;\ IIii,l Society 

1 1 i;Rui;Ft I' lioi.i.FRASs News 

,\i< Hetii (;rm-kin News 

Crw.k I'elder ("Py 

Alice Seaborn Features 

WiLLETTV .loiiNSON Features 

Ku,-^s PoM) Engineering 

Li ( ii.i; Dwis Cartoonist 

i.i \ \{. \\ i;iiii Adrirlising 

Heporlirs 

Mill) I'.li/uhclh Tisdiilc. hmi- Spi'iict'. Genevieve Pyle, 
Carl lllii:. liariN Tallxit. Ilclfii lialK'. .Iiilia Hiird Ricker. 
MarjoiN Kilt'\. Viidies llannoii. IJairv Kiise. Fred Alahaf- 
U-\. Mar\ Kli/al)i-lli liomif. Tlioinas (ircady. (lliarlotte 
Collins. |{cls\ Kkss. Dan .Slralton, Harold Braun. 



t', . 




I II I: 



/' / r / / A' E S 



Tor: Tall.ul. lliiislcy. 



•>(PEri \l. THRE*>>HKn!< 

Six Special Ivlitioiis of the Tlirosher this year gave lln- 
regular staff one iiiiirc \teeV. of rest than is usual. Only two 
of lIuMii yarieil from the rii;ular Tliresiier style, anil the 
question arises — "^ In Special Kditioiis anyway'.'" 

The Senior Edition with 1{. S. Drake I''>(litor and Allhea 
]lill Business Managier set the st\le wilii a straight news 
edition. It was sayed from medio(rit\ onl\ 1p\ Iwo eyeei- 
lent feature stories hy Isaac (iarrett and Durcll (^arolhers. 
Yi ith T. Roy licnslex and ,)oe Mien apjioinled f.dilor 
and Business Manager exactly one week liefi>ri> tiie Junior 
Thresher's appearance, the Juniors produced a creditalile 
Thresher: straight news, passalde features, excellent 
caricature of Vir. Allenliurg. 

The Sopiioniores coidd not a\oi(l using a trick name. 
The Slasher was a creditahle reminder of good points of 
J'hresliers of other M-ars. Harry 'J'albot edited the copy. 
Flip Calhoun sold the ads. 

The Kngineers pul)lished a six page llairyears WeekK 
with some attention to tlie east side of the cain|>us. Ross 
I'ond made a good editor, witii Rilly Russell financing. 

The Kreslmian jjaper told all ahout the picnic in colored 
ink. It was hard on the eyes but not a bad paper. Joinmy 
Jones hustled for copy, Gordon Nicholson sold ads. 

To the Co-eds goes the gilded waste-basket for the best 
Thresher of all. Tone S])encc and Mariann Adkiiis headed 
the staff. 



t'.IVITOM: S|«'lirr. I1i;ik.' 




u 



V .. d > 



T II K n I r i<: o w 



THE PICTLRES 



Toi>: Hcyiiohis, \\Tij;hl. 



Bottom : Wiisoii. Alien; Eagle. Crawrort!: 
Hilil. MaiDonakI: Pierec, Williams. 





Board of Managers 

('.EtmcK T. Reynolds. ,)r Editor 

lIvROLi) liiELL Wright Business Manager 

Sidney J. Wilson. ,Tr Assistant Editor 

.loE \. Allen AssislanI Business Manager 

,l((i; II. Eagle Associate Editor 






Editorial Board 

Dorothy Dunn Poetry Editor 

Corinne Crawford Literary Editor 

Scott [.ee IIild Lilemrv Editor 

Paultne MacDonald Art Editor 

\. H. Fierce Art Editor 

M vrtii \ Ellen Wtlll^ms Art Editor 




Fletcher Broa\n Eiliior-'ui-CJj'u'j 

Whitney Reader ictin^ Business M(iii(ii>rr 

DlRELL C^VROTHERS issiK'ialc I'jHlnr 

Jack Scott -issisiani Editor 

W ILFRKI) Stedm \\ Arlisi 

<(>\TniiuToiis 

Ilomuisrllr Hn.lcii, Spm.Tr S.oll. 11. .ur I )i;ikr iin.i -lolm 
Scliuhinuc'lu*'' were Suprcnie Hitrli Moguls ol'Tliings In (Icnt'"'- 
jil. Tliey (lid overylhin;; I'roni V U) Z. and thai is a wide lan^-^c 
on an annual, — -jaastinfi pictures, writing copy, re-wrilinjr co|)y, 
iietting information, reading proof, pasting more (and more) 
pictures, and wiial-nol. In particular, I It-mo waldied m *'r 
Seniors and got Trustee piictures. Spencer ■ o!li< l.-d organiza- 
tions dope, Rowe wrtjle for Sallyport and Hack, and .folui 
mounlcfl Sallyport pictures. Rowi^ came al a time when ihc 
editor had begun to believe he was descried, and he \\;is I he 
proverbial frien 1 in need. Jack Scot t bad bis share of in\\\ joli>. 
but liis particular responsibility was tin- football w r ih -up 
Tone's major duly was lo contribute to liie Society :iinl <., en- 
pus accounts. Carl wiole Golf and some J'^reshman Spoils, inn I 
even contributed to the Rack, as well as other orirl jt>!fs. Mcleu 
Williams wrote Dramatics, Howard Ranner, Piaskelball. Lewis 
S. Smith, Raseball. Ed Becketibach, Tennis, Stewarl Lamkin, 
Cross Counlry. Thomas Chapman, the Dedication, au<l Larry 
Hamilton, Track. Jessie Jones and Dan Si rat ton helped several 
afternoons. Lucille Davis contributed a couple of carloons. 
and everybody that cnme near the Camr^inile ollice wms raked 
in for something. 

Assistance was not limilt^d lo Rice slu<lents. Fannii' tins 
Simpson was no end of liel[:) in mounting the Stdlyport plates. 
The Campanile is indebted to Fairfax Moody for her < lcvr[ 
illuminalioii of the Ln/rnd oj the Phnvinan 

To tell all that Durell Carolhers assisted in would hr I.. 
enumerate tbe conlents of the Campanile. He was iK Irin' 
backbone. He kept Ibe editor from losing hope aItoyeth< r. ^uid 
the editor believes him iiolliiiii; shurl ofsaiiilhood TIk- Hack 
was his special care. 



Tin: i»:fio I A>ii>AX 

THE riCTLRES 

Tui-: IJiown. tlniulhers. ReadrT. 



I'.oi loM. li;Mlc.i. S. SrotI: .1 S.-..II. Drake: 
S.hnhmiirlH-,. Spenre; lUig, \\ illiams. Banner; 
Sinilh. Tis.|;il.-. Lamkin. 





■■• '-/^.^^ 



Ik > '-1 '.« 



, «1 : ¥. 




ORGANIZATIONS 




i 



^ f* 



>*a. vn 



fl RJ' 






E 1. 1 / A IS K T II It A I. II W I > 
LITE IK A II V S04 IKTV 

riih: picri RhJS 

Hh;ht: Foster. _M. L. (Joss, Cooke: SloUes, 
( itrrnwootl. Loiiuc 

(■|:ni t:R: rMMk.-r. I'-ntK. ( iiUrr; \l;ir,-. 
I>ij[iii. M.ir.i Itiinn. Inti\ ill.- I-:. (loss. 
Ilrtl.rliii. .lunrs: \aus. MrCnrlliy. Mc- 
(.;u>; M.llnmrr. M . .i, I ^nnni > . Unhinsn,, 

Lkft: Rr»M|. liotii.K., S.ivn'sl. Sellers. Sul- 
lle. Vinson. \\;ilk.-r. WcisriMiin. Wli.irloii 





President 

. . \ irc-Presidt'iil 

Secrclary 

Treusiirer 

Sergeai)t-(il'<irnis 
Lo(.;iiK. , .Cliaiiiiiini Pmiinfin CniinniKri' 
ssiK .lo.NKs < :oiinfilnitin-al'liinir 

\Ri.VN \l i';i.i.iN(;i'H . . , Hcporl'T 

SSII-: liohi N.s()> i'.rilir 

Caivii:h (Uinn-iinni I'lnlcrUiinnn'iil Com. 

MoiN'K.uM i-.m ('.lUlliril <){ TvihlliiC 

McCMdin l.i'nl kn-f.rr „J !hr Srnif.s 

Mnnhrrs 

K \ r mn N Lo(;ui-: 

\ I.I M. Li cv 

\l MIC. McC \H 111 V 

MiKiAM AIcGaiu 

AIARI4^f Mellim;i-:« 

Catk. MoNTr;oMi:uv 

VjRf;iM \ Hkiji 

.li-:ssrE HoBiNsoN 

NOELIE ROiMKKO 

Cleo Segkest 

NiiLLEiN Sellers 

Do]\oi Jiv SroKi;s 

l'i:ri ^ Llo^ 1) Si ii i.h: 

\ lUGiMA \ l^^so^' 

CaTHRVN \\\\LKli:R 
h]|»N \ \\ KISM \ W 



Viti.i.i: \\ )i AuroN 



Wi -^ 



I 



^ . 




- f^l 





w ~y 



^' ■ -''■ 



Ollicers 



NaN(:y FoRni-;.s 


Pi 


i-silll'lll 


l-^Di riiK \\ i:s[i-:BFn.;i,ii 


1 iir-Pi 


rsiili-iil 


lldMUISKI.l.K IIaUI-.N 


Si 


rii-liiiy 


Mary Tali.hmekt 


Ti 


■iisnrrr 


Derby Qi_iin , , . 


/. 


nii.rin 


HEl.^;^' Ntn\ Scorr . 


Si-ii,ri,i,l-, 


l-.in„s 


Pai LINK M m:Donai.ij 


. .Si'lqi'iilil-i 


I'liriiis 



Jn.THNM-: Sakowit/. Cliitin. Pnxinnii Cum 



Members 

Sally ARH\^T.s \l \isii>\ M(im (;()\ii,n\ 
Elkanor Babnks AIahv Lou Moom 

Nancy Fobbf:s Debb^ ( )i in 

HOMOISELLK HaDKN Lll.lli, Hl( I 

Eugenia Hamilton .Hlij.nm: Sakuwit/, 
Anne Hp:y(;k Helen IVina Scott 

Evelyn Hi(;inbo'i imm M \hima Stewart 
Betty Hoix I'vtsy Street 

Elizabeth John M\rv Tali-r;iii,t 

Pauline MacDonalh K. \\ estkbkiei.ji 
Rowena MacLau<;hi.in T. Williamson 



PAM.AS ATIIK.XF IJTKKAKV 
SOI IKTV 



77//-; PlCTl BES 

Left: Forln-s. W.-sirr lirM ; li;,.!,,!, ^\.^ 
lichel. 




' ,% 



n ^ 







ii^ 



' ?^t 

'■f' 



9 




BlI 





4>WK.\ WISTKII IJTI-:itAKV 

<»»rii':TV 

TiiH ricTi hk.s 

1i.:iit: lirlli^ni>, I'.lakr, S.lkiiis; I! d, 

'..•n\. lirrryiiiiiri; (:.>lliiis. (■...ii:;liliri. D.-l- 

:i.:NT|.,ii: I'^la;;;:. I.r.u,[. M.Hlii.k; I Iciirhins. 
,■11. L. B. .iuhiisiin W .l..l,iivnTi. K,IK, 
\iilii; Lousrliri.li;., MrWhi.lcl, I'.-rkluiii. ; 
.rknis. Hcicl. Hi. k,r 

I M S.-liri,'i.lri', ScNlc.ri. Sonvlls. S|irri... 
Ili..,i„.|l. 'I'is.liil.-, \\,sliii,,iikirMl. II. S\il- 
litiius. \1 !■: Williiirns 




f^ 



^ 






U 



jf-^ 




<A 





ts^X^Jli: 



<^ 



Ol'jkers 

I )iini>i in \\\:\ \\\\\ President 

Lniii I'm.msi \lre-Pn'si(Ient 
.1 \ M I W 1 SI \n)ni I. \ M' .. Secrefarv 
\] \[\.\\\\ \ HKi \s Treasurer 

III Ml S»iiiiii,i,l.s , < Jirresi)iiiiiliii(i SerreUiry 

Members 
M\iu\NN ViiKiNs Mildred Kelly 

(ih:Him DE 1*.E\IUI \I VHCELLE KlNG 

Mabi 1I\[,lie hEnin Hi ni Loighbidok 
.lo Bi:bh^m \n Hi null in McWhibteb 

I )um. I in I'll I II \ \ ^ \ 1 1 I i:n pEtKii \^i 

LiLLIE I'lAKE \1 Mil llj.LLE PeHKIN.s 

<'||,\BL0TTE CoLLIiNS H,\7.EL ReID 

MaBIE CoiMillLlN ,!|iLI\ HliBD RlCKEH 

(iRACE DELLIf\<;ER KlsIK ScHNEIDER 

I >uiuM in I'lAi;*; She Sexton 

/l lUI Ii \ < i II \ \ I HliTII SORRELLS 

Ijiiiw IIohmhk Ione Speince 

\| Mn I . I liii . Ml N-- I ll I \ \oH TllOBNELL 

/i iM \ .1 1 I I M \in I;li/\retii Tisdale 

Loi i\ \\ ,l«iiiN-.o\ ,1 \ME Westmoreland 

W II I I I I \ .lo||\v.)N Hi■;LE^ \VlLLI\MS 

M MtlllV I'^LLEN WiLLLVMS 



i 




(tflin-rs 

Valerh-: Reevks hirn-tm' 

(iENEVlEVK VVuri'i-: Prrsidcnl 

Gmne\ li-:\ E Pvi.E. . . Srrrrl(ir\'-Trr(isiirrr 
Frances Black I'mtnsl 



Mctiibers 

Eugenia Adams M \mi\MKT Lin\<: 

Gertrude Bearu W ii i, w i i M* Keum \\ 
Frances Black Kvel\ \ M \iuis 

(/ii:ORf;iANA Bonner M \iu;ahi;i Mmuin 
Mary Elizvuetii I'impm Miidiuji i)r.,. 
Ina Hklenk I'xn i> <ii \e\ii:vk ISi.k 

Maurine Bush \ alerik Rkeves 

t I [|\ (mHI'^MMN 1,1 N\ ll(l-^i:Mt\( M 

\1 \in Vi)l:link Da\ is M \hi.\hi:t 'l\ii.i:n 
Helen Forester Dorotih Wae.ker 

\ \NMK Mm ( ; \^ I I \ 1. 1 I.I. W KM njiu 

Frances Haiukv ( ii:i\EviEvi-: Whiie 

Willetta Johnson Nola Mae \Viij,iams 



T II i{ u I It Ls* 4; i>:i: r ij It 

Left: Rccv.-s, Wliilr: l>>lr. WUuk. 



Centku: pM-Jird. liniiiirr : llonni-. l>t>yi!; 
Busli, Chii.slm.iti; Duvis. l-..rrshi. 



llM.in : (;;iyl.-. Il;ir\ry. Joliiisdii, Lony, 
Mans. M.uliiK O-;:, Tol.l. Wrnlirrl 




^I^ 







h L 



IMKI<:-KA>V ASMM lATlOA 

Oflirrrs 
John C. Ridley PrcsidciU 

JOH> SCIH IIM VCUKK I -I'ks. 

R. R. Alu\i gh S('c-l^n'(is. 

Carl Illig Serge<int-al-(irnis 

Menihers 

Hii HI N \i,ii\i i;ii ('\Hi, Ti,i.i(i. .Ik. 

l\\Hi. \\ii HM\^ Mtiiiiu-- l.i niKi: 

l-"intni,M Li i; \^l^Hl;\^^ .Iwn-.sM. Liki.:s 
r>\\!i;iir \i sriN IIkkbekt Mammas 

IIkhbk HI r>iii 1 lit v-s N \ I i! \N M II I.I n 

Ci.AV \ r.iu\N lli\in ('. N \<ii:i.. .1 H. 

Fletcher B»o\\iv I-'reij I'miks 

Thomas L, lim mmi-:-ii I'.nw. \. I'\|l^l^ 

(ill.BKMT i)| Mv .lt)HN ('. |{|l>l.l-:\ 

.1(111% (;\';i-: L<n IS U^isEMii.m; 

.l<»K ( > \n/. \ .I(iii\ SiMn. ii\i \rii i-;it 

Henry Holder Spenceh Scih r 





MenibiTS. Conliniicil 



Bin Si,\\ \-:\.i, 
H<i\ Si:\\ i;ei, 
I ) \N Sin \ II (>\ 



I )i mi I C. vno iTTi:ns 



Henry L. Tro.st 
.1. lj\\\RENrE Tryox 

I I \HOI.l) BeM, \\ RKillT 



BiiMA n \ \ insox 



Toi- Mlinii-li. \rnr,Mi;.ii. \ii(livws: Ausliii. BolMras.- 
I',m« ri. I'.riimin.ll. Cniulliris. 

i;.iii<.M l);i\i(ls..,i. Dunk; Cii-f, ("::irza. 



Briiii 



.. '^-^-ii-r ric 



»3>s.v 




"1 





^- ^. 



^ 








7^ 



^^ 



JiL 



'1 




Tlii'n- lia\c lii't'ri miincroiif alTair~ |ilaiirii(l in [he 
|)ast ti) stimulate interest williin the j;r(iM|p. La^t 
Jiuie a Pre-Law Ball was sixiiisored at tlie riose ol 
exams. Tlie suceess of this venture i;ave the cluh a 
sound financial hasis anil |(a\e(l tiie was for nianv 
activities in I'li*^)-.'?!). Three hanqui'ls and a |)i(nic 
are to be included among these, and also a second 
annual Pre-Law Dance, whicii again took place on 
the Rice Roof at the termination (d linal exams. 



rifE pri:TURES 

Top; Holden, IlliK, Miller; NuKfl, Ridle) 
machfcT, Scoll, B. Sfwell. 

Bottom: R. SowcII. TrosI: Tryori, \\>ii;ht. 



Koscnherg; Schuh- 



lll>>T4»ltV A.M> 1*1 IKI>OSI<: 

The Pre-Law Association was 
organized in 1922 with ahout lil- 
teen charter members for a two- 
fold purpose: to organize those 
students at Rice who plaimcd to 
stndv law. and to organize those 
students most \itall\ iiilerested 
in seeing a siliooi of law established 
at Rice, in order that thev might 
^tiirudate interest among outside 
agencies in c\entnallv securing the 
establishment ol such a school. 
With these purposes still in mind, 
the Vssocialion has enilea\oreil to 
establish contacts with Houston 
attorneys bv inviting them to 
s|)eak to the Association on topics 
of interest to students contemplat- 
ing the stncK of law. \t the same 
time it is believed that those men 
who have visited the meetings of 
the Association will be more inter- 
ested in seeini; a law school at l\ice. 







4iillll.S- TEX.M!>i> 4 LI It 

Till-: Pit rr I RES 

Hu-.ut: \\.,\lr. liiMiiiMii. I'.liizck, Hl,.n- 
lii'iiu, Hdoiu — Houriic, Boyd. itruin-t. 
Hybce. C.fyancs— Clark, Cook. I. Dii- 
vis, M. A. Diivis, Dniki'. 



Hklow: ^e^^aison, (iayle, llanuoi), 
Houchins,.Ior<!an — .losi, k<.»rhlrr.Loiiii. 
Ludtki'. Marrs — Malllipws. M.illscin, 
O'Fiel. Overcash — Rii'icherl, Hin-kcr. 
Kiilfs, Si-lmeidiT — Siliill, Scliiilila, Sca- 
hora.Sniilli — Slai-key,Stopford,Slrpfl. 
Taylor — ToliT. Walker, Vau^han, Zir- 

l.rl 





(^ff'f 



M. B. Bl,C)M)K\L . . 


. President 


(tLadv.'^ Schill. . . . 


. . J'-Pres. 


Mar.iorik I5<)i hnk 


Secretarv 


Margaret Tolkk . 


. Infisun'r 


Audrey H\xno>' 


Hi ftnrfrr 


Dn. II. i:. Hrw 


Sf)fnis<tr 


Menihers 




VUEI-MW \^ 


Sen ILL 


( i \1 ! 1 


SniNKIDHB 


Hannon 


Scin LU.\ 


HOSMKR 


Sk.-\burn 


llor, IITNS 


K Smitti 


.1 »N 


1. Smiiii 


.I..-I 


St \hki;v 


Km,, H 1,11 


Skpi'i (inu 


\Ai\ti 


St r k kt 


\a inKK 


S'l'ii.Mvr 


M \ a 11.^ 


SlTiLTINi: 


Mmihkws 


Ta^ l<ir 


M \i rso^ 


ToLKH 


>.' KTI.W 


W \i K i:» 


(VKlKL 


W MIS 


< )\ 1 IK \SII 


W 1 [ 11 WIS 


li in Ml HT 


\ \i t;ii \\ 


Hi i w\:n 


ZlHBKL 


lUi.i>, 






■■:.Miii.M<:i':iii.\4;<«orii<:TV 

/■/;,■ I'irhiirs 
liiiir I: \,l;iiii^, \llill. \rniisliaii. 
Balz.'ii. l',..,v.T. .';..» ;\ r„,rsk\. 
Case. Cuopfi. Dudgc, Edwards. Ifi'ir 
3: Ferrin, Fiiichcr. Ginlz, Gon/alcs, 
Griffin. Row 'i: Hailey, Haliiiri. 
Hanks. Harris. Hawley. Biiiv 't: 
Hodgson. Hoihuid. Hopkins, .lolin- 
son. Jones. Rnir H: Markins. Marlin. 
Meriflell. Morrill. Newding. Rmi' 7: 
(I'Neil. Oslerrnaii. I'ayne. Pcillan. 
Power. Rnir ,V lle,-d. liol.l), lioss. 
SollI.ergrr. Slanrliir Hole !): Slolle. 
'I',ill)erl, \ ail Zailill. Vinock. Volk- 
[11. T. Hn,r /» Wallis. Wells, Winkler. 
W riL:lll. "I anrr\ 



Ofliirrs 

rirsi Tfrm 

\\ 11 HI 11 W 1.1. .Ill Prrxiilrnl 

D.\^ ME^DEL1. \'lrf Prrslilml 

Fred Cb.^io Sfci-rlaiv 

3. R. Y.VNCEY Trrtisuirr 

E. E. Ferbin 

E.rfclllirt' Coninnllccumii 

Srniiiil Trnn 

D.4^- Mem.ii.i. Pr.-si.lrnI 

Fred M \ii\i i i:> . . Vice Presiil<nl 

F. B. W amis Srrrrlurv 

Y. R. Y.\NCKV Tivasuvcv 

R.WMOND SroNK 

E.nrulirr Con, null, rut, in 



Members irtiose f>iflurr^ fin nnl iijijiei. 



Acheson 


Im- 


■rielis 


PomI 


Barron 


11; 


lias 


Ragland 


Beyetl 


Ih 


1.' 


Boliinson 


Black 


111 


1 w i 1 / 


hountre.' 


Brigger 


K, 


ating 


iUiii.iii 


Chun. H. .\ 


\l. 


niza 


S. Iiiill 


Chun. M. 


M 


l.'li.'ll 


Siill.'iiil.'i 


Craig 


M 


■k.Mii 


Sw.'.'ll.N 


Davis 


Mckenzie 


Willy 


Franklin 


\. 


sl.'r 


Willniaii 





4L 




n 

n 


^ 

f^ ' 


^ 






t 







e 

f ~ w 






,% ;^ ^- 







^ ^ ^ 



THE FicrrREs 

Row 1: \v;hiI, ('.uopi'i, (. 
Craiiz. W.Criinz. Donoixliiu' 

Row 2: Gage, Gresliinii. 
Ht'iisley. Hiiiies, Koeppr 

Row 3: McKay, MentK-ll. 
Murphy, Norvell, Pilts. 

Row t: Rawlins. lii.ll.N, 
Robb, Roysr, 

Row :>; RussrII, SaHMuhirl, 
Slaik, L. A. Sniilh. 

Ro\\ (i: L. E. Smilli. Slrtjufi, 
Swanson, Temple. 

Row 7: Van Zandl, Vesey, 
Webb. Wilsoa. 

Row 8: Works. Wrislll. 
Yaneey, Yeatrnan. 





Tin: KAIJ.VriJ K 

OFFICERS 

HoMEK Matthes Chairman 

Ravmo^jd Pitts Vicr-Chairnian 

i First Term) 

Giis Cr\nz \'irt'-(Jluiirinan 

iSccojid Tt'nii) 

Fred Royse Secretary 

ViWNCis Vesey Treasurer 

E.ifrulire Com mil lee 

\\i>Hi.in M. Cooper Raymo.^d Pitts 

{.seeoiul lerm) (first term) 

Otis Cranz Egerton Robb 

H. L. Hensley Fred Royse 

{second lerm) .Iames Swanson 

Robert Himes [first term) 

Homer Matthes W . K. Va\ Zant 
Francis Vesey 

Members ^V}lose Pictures Ihi \nl Appear 

.1. M. Barron Rlduy Lykes 

Tom Blake Thomas Lyon 

Wilson Brooks, Jr. Homer Matthes 

C. L. Cunningham Philip Renn 

A. G. Floyd John Schuiimacher 

Mark Hopkins J. D. Simpson 
C. 0. Terrell 



1 ^- 



^- J,^ r^y ^ , r^^ 




THE PICTURES 

T.ii — H(nv I: \. Black. F. 

Blaik. HIaz.'k, Boon.'. G. 

Branill. 

Row 11; I.. Krailill. Husll. 

Clay. Colliris. Clilloni, 

Huw :i: li. Ciiitlillis. Cuisoii. 

Di..(lcri.li. F<-I.|pr. r,ayl(.-. 

Bottom —How i : S. Ciillills. 
V. Griirills. .larilzfii. ,lilL 
Ro^v 2: .luhnsoii. .Ionian. 
Ka,stl. KeuiitHly. 

Row ?,: Lawsoii. ( »^y. Baiipy. 
S.-hill. 

Row I: Sriuilda. Simons, 
Sniilll, Slrobfl. 

Row .'S: Toler. Tnrrni', \\r,t\- 
'■V, W Pisiiiffcr. 



CHRISTIA.\A««M»4 IATI4».X 

Cdhiin'l 

Frances Cullom Pirsitfcnl 

Maurine Bush Vice-Prrsuienl 

Helen Starkey St-rrehirv 

Zklm.v .Text Treasurer 

Chairmen of Comniillees 

Frances Black. ... , Music and lVor.s7///« 

Willetta Johnson Puhlicily 

Mildred Ogg Soeiul 

Marg.\bet Toler 

C.hrislian World luliirulion 

Adt'i'iory Board 

Mrs. E. O. Lovett _ . i.'Jmirnian 

Mrs. R. a. Tsvnoff Mrs. Eugene Bl.vke 
Mrs. H. B. Weiser Mrs. Sara Stratford 
Mrs. H. a, Wilson Miss Edith Parkkk 

Members Whose Pictures Do iVof Appear 
Marguerite Stuart ALE^'E Vandaveer 







nil-: I'K ri ni-.w 

T(ii> li..« I l'.\l ilhik,-. 

|lc'l:iii<'>. I'.Mnlll.'. Cniun 

lioH L- ll,„l,,,k. Illii:. I^.inl:iil. 
I... 11^. \l;,iliii.,„ 

liou :;: Mil. h. -11, N,mI>. Nl-- 
iiiii'. (hiiii, Hi';ittfi\ 



Ih.ik.m l!il,.>. I!,,ss, Sr<.ll. 
Si-icsl , Slnvini, Sim 1 1 : Sl<,|i- 

r..r.l, T;!)!,.!'; i; Wliilr, II 

W hill' 





ni''i''ir.|.:BS 

FirsI Ti'iiii 

( Iviii. Illig. ,Ii( I'll >.i(lcnl 

Catherine Mitchell I'ice-Pn sidviil 

M \GGiE Sheaisn Seen idi-y 

Rk\ White Treaanrer 

Seeiinil liiiit 

Ke\ \\ HITE I'icsiilciil 

Defsby Quin Vice-Prcsitlenl 

(Jraham Kendxll Seenlmy 

Kd\\\is Ardher Treasurer 

\n:\ii;i:ns 

I'dwiii Aiolier. Mrs. tliigciic Ulakc. I'.\cl\ii Hylici-. Mary 
Dclaiicv. Iriiia Fonville. Naiinii (Jiiion. Lillian Horlock. (^arl 
llliji. (waliaiii Kendall. Callicrinc Long. Koherl Manoni. 
Lucille Manniiin. ('allicrine Mitcliell. \ incent Neal\, Marie 
Neniir. Derln (,)iiin. Whitney Reader. Marjurv Riley. Betsy 
Ross. Spenser Scoll. Rev. Peter (irav Sears. C.leo Sejiresl. 
Maggie Shearn. William Shull. Kgniont Smith. Helen Slop- 
lord. Marguerite Sliiart. Margaret Tavlor. (ienexieM- While. 
Hex White. 



n.^ 



U ;m 



vvv\ 



I ■. 




.\lt< IIITi:rTI IKAL 
S04 IKTV 

riiE I'll riiiES 

'I'.ir n.iu 1 : \u-<liii, Bcny- 
111:111. I'.li.rh.T. Urouii. Hush. 

How 2: I '.111. lu, II. ri;i« 1,11,1, 
KiiiTin-l.iu. 1 111,1. krlioi'. 

H<i« :!: K..,-|i|ii'. MiMzlrr, 
\!u.ir,-. I'i.T,-,-. Iliiiiili.ill. 



P.iviniM: Hnwliiis. n,'vnul,is; 
S:iiil,ir,l. Sn^uisiiii: T.illi.y. Tiil- 
siiii rurmr. \rs,'v; \V,i,'Sle- 



"//"■'■'■■- 

A. .1. Kehok President 

E.\RL KoEPl'E Vice-Presideiti 

,To Berrym AN Seen Id fv 

1 1 Mi\ IN Moore TV, iisiin 1 

Mi'iuhiis \\ liosi I'iiliins Da \(il IfiiK'iii- 



Cii \KLi:,-; Bran ARi) 
M. .1. Gammill 
J. L. Hannon 
Hermon Lloyd 



Charles Marshall 

H. G. McDamel 

Racuael Rich 

Kenneth .'zanders 



BAlLE'i S\>ENSON 



Ifiiniinii \ \fenilx IS 



William Ward \^ aimn 
Ja:mes Chili,ii\n. ,Tr. 

ClFARLES ].0\\MVN |{|io\\NE 



I REDERK \\ ILLL\M BrOWNE 

\. StWTON Nl'NN 

KdU \RD lio^M^KS \rI!VNIS 



Thomas Bacon 
H. Calhoun 
F. Freyer 
Grace (^ale 
Henry Howze 



Assoeinh \hinl>rrs 

I 'red Jones 

ILL. Kelly 

T. McCleary 

E. McNeill 

George Osbirn 



{ JiRis Pope 

^'ININ(, Reynolds 

.]. Seale 

.]. Woods 

P. H. Wolf 




■•KK-.MKItirAI.Mtl'IKTV 

THE PICTURES 

Top — Row 1: Bnycr. I'.li.oni, Driuii, 
Riown. 

Kow 2: Clark, Davis, Donnelly, i:)u- 
croz. 

Row 3; Felder, GarsI, Garza, Gret'n, 



Bottom: Lony, Lyori:<Hiver, Hoseii- 
zweig; Sanderford, Scaborti; Tay- 
i^arl, Taulx'tiliaus; T''rii|)ic. 





0(firprs 

W. C. Brown President and \ ice-President 

Alhjb Seaborn Secretary 

V. J. Donnelly Treasurer 

Harold E. Braun Executive Committee Member 



Members 



Weldon T. Baker 
Wallace G. Banks 
Ben H. Bayer 
Mantel Bloom 
Harold E. Braun 
W. C. Brown 
Winthrop Carter 
A. I. Clark 
I[avilet I. Davis 
V. ,J. Donnelly 
Lawrence Ducroz 
Vernon E. Duerer 
LouLSE Felder 
Norman Garst 
Joe Garza 
Wilbur K. Green 
A. L. Hamilton, Jr. 



Kirk JI arrison 

Catherine Lomg 

T. P. Lyon 

ItiCHARD Nixon 

John Oliver 

Milton Rosenzweig 

Bobby Sanderford 

Jack Sanderford 

Alice Seaborn 

Allen Sherrill 

Lloyd Sherrill 

Le Roy Sims 

Murphy Stevenson 

William Strozler 

M. S. Taggart 

Leon Taubenhaus 

John Temple 



f\ ' -' ■" ' ^ 




Oflirrrs 
.1«H-: Z. r.MV/.\ rvrsnirn! 

Anna Ohutno \'icr-Pn-si(lrnl 

Mar<;( KRll H \li»U!(.:ii Svcrrhirv 

Grace Bkrlino / n-nsmri 

Grace Felder i'n},hrily 

Andre Bourgeois Funillv Xdnsoi 

L. G. Miller Fnrnllv \,lnsnr 

MARrEL MORMID. Furilllv \tlnsi>l 



MoZELLE \lDIS 

H. O. Aluricii 
Marguerite Aluricii 
Ruby Bartine 
Grace Berling 
Andre Bourgeois 
W. C. Brown 
Alice Blixton 
Ruth Campbell 
Harry Chavanne 
Bill Coleman 
Dorothy Compton 
\(;nks Ci llen 
Lavone Dickensiieet?- 
.1. Engerrand 
Grace Felder 
Sibyl Feeder 



Mrmhrrs 

.1 S,< K ( Iaiuhmer 

.loi': Z. (^AR/.A 
1''r \NCES ISBELr, 
Fl>N \ .l<MINSON 
l,sARl-:i.LA KaSTL 

Mildred Kelly 

Roslyne Kuminir 

Aline Liicy 

NoAK Mayp:u\. 

Hope Mengden 

Marvin Mickle 

1^. C\. Miller 

F. MoNT<;OMERY 

Oh. M. Mor\i d 

Kvi.i-: Morrow 

Harvey i\oR\ELL 

FUGENF, GbEBLE 

Anna Ording 



>.<M.l- I' A IUU~II 

M\ry Belle PERKl^s 
Nelda Reiciii hi 

LiLLIE Rl I All MUM 
NOELU, lti>\ll lUi 

Mabel Rulis 

Kred Sni-n.rciN 

1\ \ Smiim 

C.\\ \Ri.ini i; Sri-i (.1 II 

M Mn \l.H K Sl l,\ KNS 

\1 mk; \ itKi Si \ \ii r 

Roberi Si \mii H-- 

Edna M vi \ m '-h n n 

(iE4.)R<^;E Vt!N .Ki||N><>N 
kl Rl \i>N .hniNSON 

Lai RENE Wadi-: 
Gene\ ii:\ I-; \\ n 1 1 i 



i^Ks II I KOI X riiK.xni 

THE PICTl liES 

'r.)i>~Row ] : Aldis. r..Mliiic. P.i'i- 
liii- Rouri^rois. 

i;..\\ -2: CMiiipli.ll. (■..tiii.h.ri. C.iil- 

l.'M. Di.k.-lisllc.-ts. 

R.)^\ :l: (i I'.'l.lr,. S. l-'.l.lri. r.;ir/.n. 



I'.oin.M: Mr.klr. Milln; \lu., 
(ti.liiii:: I'crkins, hnrurro; Sic. 
W.i.ir. \\ \u\r 




ItArriKT XTIMK.XT I.XIO.X 



Coiinril 

Mll.lMU II \\ HEKl.Ell Sliidcnl St'Cirlnry 
K(;i:i\i(i\ S. RoBB, . , .Prestdcnl 

Lucii.Li^ SctrrT . . \ ire-Presidrnl 

Lke II. .)oll^soN \'icc-Prrsiilciil 

S.VNDKns Lyles Secrclfiry 

Lewis E. Smith Treasiinr 

O, C. Talbeht . Puhlirily 

Marv lUiSTP/T.s. /,s7 Chiitrli Rice Class 
h. TiiYON.-Prfs. -Jiiil Chun-h Rice Class 
Lee Johnson Pres. S. Main Rice Class 
Wilt, ]\\^t Prrs. B.Y.P.U. 





L 
W 

r. 

C. 



K. L \lNl»RK\VS 

B. li. ,\n\oi.L> 
W. V \n\<)Li> 
G. Boone 
L. BiwMvr 

* t. P>H Win 

.1 M licVM It 

(.'.. Blaih 

B. Blaih 
H. Bat IE 

W. I1\KEH 

C. Bo^i) 
B> It mm; I- It 

B>lt MXU lt> 

Bem. 
W. IUnks 

L (:i,\> 

,1 < '. \A1I'HELL 
.1 ( .11 \MBERLIN 

L. ('abamss 
C. Cabboli, 

.1 (^loiiBTNEV 

\V , Coleman 

I I. ClIAVANNE 

\V. M. Chapman 
H. Calhoun 

i ', < '. \B I EB 
\' 1)\\ IS 
.1. l.)A\\S<)i\ 

V. .1. DoiNNELL^ 

\. I)i-;bni-;y 

C. DEUNin 

V. Dl EKEB 

n DlNON 

\l l)\M- 

\ I^Ml:l(s^^^ 

M. l-l\ ivroAT 

I-: l'onni.;s 



III I I'm 1 1 MIS liu' 
B.M loM S.oH. L>lr 



Alembers 

C. Farrington 

A. C. Finn 

,T. Fite 

\{. Foresteb 

G. Geyer 

L. Hill 
\L Heyne 

K. IIOLLOWAY 
\. HOOPEB 

M. L. HoucHiNs 

G. W. Hewitt 

F. Glasson 

L. Geben 

L. Gleavks 

I', L. Ingram 



I . II Johnson 

/J ETT 
VV . JlIDD 

W. James 

L. Kayseb 

S. Lyles 

K. LOGGINS 

J. F. Lilly 

K, MgGinty 

. G. Mansfield 

\. McDonald 

E. May 

1^ Metzler 
1., Moore 

\. Metzleh 
K. McNeilly 
M. Mitchell 

E. McNeill 

I'. ()\ERCASH 

C. Penfieu) 
W . Pkelek 

I']. BOBB 



J. BoBtNSON 
W Bi ST 

J, Boi;i:ns 

N. Reicheut 

C. Reedeb 

M. lUsT 

B. \\\S\ LINSON 



B 



L. Shei'I'abu 
S. Satterfield 
J. Sweeney 

( ). L. SrULTING 

D. SlOKES 

J . SANnEBIOBO 

[■>. S\ni)i-:ri'ohl» 

L. Siii-;kkill 

L. Scott 

J. Shlirtlefe 

N. Sellers 

L. E. Smith 

E. Stew \k'i 

O. C. Talbebt 

J. Temple 

L. Tryon 

T. TllACARD 
C. ViCKERY 

B. Walker 

G Wilson 

B W i.i.ii vrsEN 

S Willy 

J. Waihen 

M. Williams 

J. Williams 

B. Wolf 

E. WOBKMAN 
I) W AI.KER 

J M Willis 

C, West 

W W II I l\MS 



WIh'.'I.t. |;.)I.I.. J..lms<ML 
: Smilli. \l Biisl; T-ilbcrl. TiyoiL 




THE >VKITl>4.i 4 l>l IK 



r II E PICTURES 



'I'dlv \\siiii, Scahorn (Pri'si(ii-iil ) 



r.oiioM: Ft'lder, Drake; GriHin (Sccif. 
i:ii \ - rri'asarer),Matlson;Talbij[, \\ ii^h!_ 






g (R-LrA-L h.-Ju^ l-Ul^l^W-^O-^-^^ft^ 









n.: 



H-c^ 



,Q*, 









if ^' 



Q^ ja^'i-ot^ — ■ 



iS^^^i^^ .JyTi2,«^f-' -= 



'■7.w./-» r:^ 



'T 





4 :.^ 



A V fkO kM 



U_ 4 Ii-!rf i I • 




W A ». ^ '« 



F 





I , I I . I , I \ \ 1 1 1 1 I ; I , ( ) c iv 







L I L L 1 K 1! L A R E 



c:. , 



II 




C H R I :^ T 1 iN E P (.) P 1-; 




I' s I I.I \ !•: M AcDi) \ w.n 







'fau')Mj)£i 



f^ 



^^«x 



ELEANOR BARNES 




VIRGINIA REED 



i 



iijM 




l!0 W I, \ \ \l ^. I. \ I li II LI \ 




M \ II .1 n 1! 1 I-; D UN rs 



ni 




S w 



If 




Tlll<: rO>l>IITTKK o.\ 
Ol TIMMMt SrOltTS 

rill- (ioinmillcc consists of ,1. I. 
McCiaiils. Cliainiian, H. K. Iliini- 
|p|ir('\. Sc(i('l:ir\ . I{. G. Caldwell. 
II. i:. Hiay. A. S. Cleveland. E. F. 
Kalli. aiul Dudley Jarvis. The C(jni- 
niilloc lias (•(iiii|>lele control of all 
liranclics of athletics at Kice. aiul 
\»li(ii one considers the wide field 
this co\ ers. it should he evident that 




its duties are iiiaii\ and its action important. 
Its [lalli is lhorn\ with charjies on every side of 
coiimiereialisin in the athletics of modern colleges. 
\l Kice there are teams that every student can 
make, even if he doesn't succeed in getting on the 
team of his choice. But compulsory participation is 
at outs with the liberal spirit of Rice. 

The ( iommittee has watched with great jileasiirc 
and aided in the de\ elopinent of the new Pli\ sieal 
I'.dMcalion School, lor tli<' menihers. it will mean 
MKjre difTicult task- lint lighter hearts. 

Till-: >T<:>v ro.\rni<:.s 

This year saw a considcrahle change in the 
coaching staff, with Jack Meaglii'r taking over the 
posilicjn of head coach. Meagher received his fool- 
liall training from Knute Itoekne, under whose 
guidance he was playing end when the war started. 
I'Ootliall wasn t tough enough for Meagher, and 
lie joined the Marines to get into a real scrap. In 
l'li!2 he aece])ted a coaching position at St. Kd- 
warils I niversitv. and his signal snecess there 
caused Rice to hid for his services. At Rice he has 
proven exlreinelv popular. 

Mr. Meagher hail two assistants in his joh of 
coaching the varsity. One was Marvin Durren- 
herger. a former star fool hall linesman, and a 
crack jierformer in haskcthall. hasehall and track 
at St. Edwards under .lack .Meagher. He is thor- 
oughly trained in his tutor's system, and is ad- 
uiirahly suited to assist him. The other assistant 
was "Crip" GolightK, a former star athlete and 
coach of Austin College, and later coach at Cisco 
High ."Crip" also coached freshman baseball. 

This spring there was another addition to the 
coachincr staff. When (iene Hailev resiened as 
lpa,--ehall coach after he had got things started, his 
joh was taken o\er and ailmiraliK managed by 
l)aim\ Allnoih. the captain of the 192*^ team. 

riiE ricrniES 

'I'om: I'iiciilly iiii'Mil.ris ,,r 111.- I.oiiiini I In lluhl.iiir Sp.Ml.s 

— M.-tUiMls. lluiii|,lic.-N, l',ia>, I'.mI.Iu.II. 
tloriOM: Cuaell ^Mc;lylK-r. 



TIIK IIKI'AltTMK.XT OK l>IIV^«irAI. 
EDI t ATIOX 

In the fall of 192'*. f'<)it\ rrcslinifii and fiiuitrcii 
sophomores entered ihe iiewU erealed ])ii)fessi(inal 
course of study in I lie (le|iartnient of physical 
education. Physical I'diication as a science lia> 
grown IrcnienilousK in the past few years. This 
fact, willi the recent act <A' the I.egisiatMrc oT 
the State ot Texas creating corn|iulsor\ pli\si- 
cal education in the elenicntarv and secondary 
schools of the state, lias greatly increased jjrofes- 
sional op]iortunities in the held for those who arc 
ecpiipped for a career of this t\pc. Ii\ making 
ayailahle its superior facilities for the professional 
preparation of leader^ in the held of physical edu- 
cation. Rice has opened up another avenue of 
service to its already widespread inlluence. 

The course of study leads to the degree of 
liachidor of Science in Ph\ sical Kducation and 
in<hidcs a four-year jireparation in the theor\ and 
practice of physical education. chcniistr%. hiologx. 
Knglish. foreign language. histor\. education, 
economics, husincss administration, and electiyes 
from sociology, psychology, and other allied fields. 
Students must also deyote several hours a week to 
the practice of a wide variety of games and other 
|)hysical activities. In his junior or senior year 
each student is re<piired to spend a ])art of his 
time in teaching in one oi the city schools. 

Ohviouslv siicli a rigorous program of academic 
and nu)tor actiyities demands that the students 
be carefully selectcil in oriler that they may realize 
the greatest benefits from their studies. Hence 
young men possessing academic ability sufficient 
for admission tcj Rice, and who at the same lime 
are above the average in athletic skill, are the 
ones who are permittc<l to engage in pli\si<al edu- 
cation. — Harry A. Scott. 

THE PICTURES 

I ul' n-criviiii; llii' 1 




.\Tiii>:Tir .\>\ AiKiis 

riic award gi\cn arnuialK li\ 
(Jcorge Martin of ) i' Oldc Colli iir Inn 
to the most yaluahle player on the 
roolliall team was this \ car uuhesi- 
tatingh and unanimou^K voted to 
( laptain Hu^ll Jones. 

The trophy presented h\ Stuart 
Hon les. jr. to high jioinl scorer ol the 
Southwest Conference went to lake 
Hess, with a score of 11.^ iioint>. 




Top: .lal^r Hess in U 
I'roni Sluart Boylos. 
Bottom: Or. Hurry Alcxai 
IvIuratioTi. 



I.'s Ti..|,h> 

11. I'luli-ss(ir III l'li\siral 




4 :v 




fi ^ r\'' 



b S ; V . 



i-i CJ k^l ••! 




PEP! 




I .■ 




riii<:i<:ic i.i:ai»i<:ics 

riM(,iii;liiiiil llic ilark allilclic M'ar 
l")i:>>-l'IHO the iriiloiiiilahlc >|.iril <,( 
Uii r > ilicri' leaders served lo li)lsler 
ii|> llii- ll^lil and enlhiisiasiii <>! Kiee 
clieeriiij; seeliiins. [Not onlv diiriiiii 
iIk' lii^ i;aiiies lull e\ I'rv lloiir (il the 
da\ and e\er\ da\ cil llie \\eek. (ills 
and Ins eohorls. John reni|ile anil 
RilU Terrell, saw lo il thai llie s|ilril 
<il l\ice sludenls was niainlaine<l al 
a tii;liling pilcli. 

I nder llie leadersliip ni (Iran/, 
lliere was more llian llie enl and 
dried ueekjv [)e|i rall\ . There was I hi' 
I iiiie u hen ( jranz led ihe eheerin;; s<'e- 
lion hiini llie stands lo inareh doun 
the liidd wiiere. snrronndinj; a i;riinl\ 
lii;iitini; team. the\ sani; lor l-ticf s 
Honor, and inspired ihe learn lo new 
leal> III \alor. Then there Here 1 he 
ne\ er-lo-lie-lor^dl len honlires. Whal- 
e\er he attempted lie carried lo sue- 



eess throngh the pouer ol his |)ersonaiil\ and his 
unflagging zeal and energy. 

(ins said gooil-live lo Rice in June, bringing to 
an end three successful years as leader ol Rice's 
cheering section. Not a wiiidjamnier, but a man 
who looked bis followers straight in the e\e and 
spoke the plain trutli. be will go down in Rice 
histor\ as one of the greatest ciieer leaders of all 
lime, a worthy follower of .lack (ilenn. 

\ll Rice appreciates and thanks Temple and 
lerndl andCraiiz for their untiring efforts ihrongli- 
oiil the trying past \ear. and in saying good-bye 
lo Cranz feels that it is witnessing the (lassing of 
one of Rices greatest sous. 

rill': p ic.r i' n Es 

IjEft: The Boiilirc. 

Rfi.ow; Cranz. Ti'rn-ll. Ti'mpli': llir sarin- in ai linn 




I 



T II i: IK I 4 ti <» U L IK A > II 

Kliic and gray — on the iiiarcli. ai-nis> llir lirlil. 
in the stands. \lt'dli\ and thai trondmin' run. And 
lliiMi Rici s Udiiiir fur tlir kick-dlT. Ilrads inicov- 
i-rcd. Ilif;li Ii(i|p<-s. \\ Vic lioinKi In win. Sinii- lian;;. 
sing with that hand, (iood slidl. Lci>. And hit ii|i 
a march at the quarter, linic out — let (^liarlev 
take another hot eliorus. Kvervl)ody ha|ipvr' Sure! 
WelL come oa, elap! And tlien. parade at the hall. 
Goose step, Swanson; keep on strutting and suing 
that stiek. Good! good! Cross march and counter 
march. Neat work! I$ack in the stands: let's have 
Stars and Stripes. — And Bob does tickle that pic- 
colo. What! The games over! Rice's ILiiior again. 
with Gus kneeling out in front. Who won.'' \\ idl. 
what ditlereucc ilocs it make.'' The hand was good 
any wa\ . 





OJJU-rix 



!• 1, Cim.i 

W I) Cdnm:!.!. 

W W (;lUFI■l^ 

I T Sw ANSON, .1 H 
I, II ClIMIIHM 

II i: M.M,||| 



\ ia--l'nslilflll 

Lihniriun 

hrani iMojttr 

Dirrrliii 

M.in,,,,,;. \ssl IlinrI,,, 



riii Mi'i;'i's r.iik.i. iii..,iHi. i;i..uni. c.mI.- 

:nirss, C.ijni.ll. l>n[iNi|.. t'liusl. C luiTi, KmI|>- 

,,,.„lu.h, \1. A.'ill. li;,i:lM,i,l 

NL'I'O: KvMiis, .hilinki'. .Ii,iii-s. Muorr. ^M- 
ili:iii. Itcihlnson. Wilkinson. 

'I'IKIMBOMOS: C.luni, CIiihnIoo. I in-.Ti. 
L.nvis. M.irsluill, Sliui. lill 

I*. \SSI-:S; (■.lili^. l>oiik. I'llnsoii. Sini.l.Ts. 
W infills. 

llMlltdM-:: lloMi; 

■|i;\(m: Look 

DHl MS: Cioni.lx'll. (oc-sliiilii. M^iliz/.^i. 
I^liiiiin, Kiinkiii, HoiikIi. W hileli-y 

SAXOPHONF;; CiirolliiTS. E(I]1umi(1bom, 
(iardiiiiiT. .lucid, Lciiliarl. [.lullkc, Moiilgoni- 
cry. Rvills, Sii.iclerlonl. Sli-.'lc, TyKicl. Wells. 

nHOK: Olivi-r. 

CLAKINICrS: Mien. I'„y,-llr, I'.hiil. Hru.l- 
liuiy. r.liavanne, Duercr. Eafilc, Faniuhar, 
l-'inkejslcin, (iritlin. Kelly. Manuel. Marshall, 
\i\oii, Sliaruinn, Sliol'stall. Taiilienliaus, Weill) 

I'lC.CIILdS: HIair. Talley. 

I-I.l ri:S: Nix.ui. S,,ul.-. 



% 'J ^& A. 




r i 



Ml 'W in 




A 
teat 
cloth and excelsior 
owl, affectionately known - ^. 

as Sammy, is one of the favorite 
traditions at Rice. Sammy has always ^ 

been an inspiration to any Rice team . . -At one - - 

game Sammy is accompanied by a Uve owl, and Billy Ter- 
rell stands by it during the half for inspiration . . . The fight talk by 
Gus on the eve of the Texas game raises the hearers to a fighting pitch 
' by ite deep feeUng and simple sincerity . . . The huge bonfire, staged the 
night before the St. Edwards game, was the most impressive ceremony of 
the season. Members of the Rally Club were busy for a week makmg plans 
and building the huge wooden structure. The glare from, the flames that 
shot skyward could be seen all over Houston. i 

Gus Cranz was again the mas- ■ -~> - 



His talk to team 
aroused all 
present. 




T 



^ 




FOOTBALL 



T II K I » 2 » S K A S O > 

\s a uholc ihc la>t locitliall M-ason 
was aiiNlliinj; Imt a success. We won 
no jjanies in I hi' Si)iithwestei"n (^)n- 
ferenee ami llic luo ^ames we wiin 
uerc nol lioni \ ei\ li)iniiila|p|e (>|p- 

|MII1CI||S. 

The onlslandiiif; laetor tliat arose 
Ir'oni I lie |iasl season was tlii' eoiifi- 
(leriee In llie aliililx of Jack Meagher 
lo I in II oiii a roolliail team for Rice 
III lie jiioiiil of. if he has any sort of 
material to work with. The men who 
|ila\eil this last season made remark- 
alile ini|iro\ eiiK'iit under his tutelage. 

(ii\eiian\ -u|p|)ort at all. with such 
material as he has coming from the 
freshman s(|uad. we can look to the 
future with high hopes. Another im- 
portant factor was tiie willingness 
displa^ed ii\ the (lonunittee on Out- 
door Sports to cooperate in every way 
with the coaching staff. At last we 
r-eein to lie moving! 

i.ii\( M Mi:\(;iii:i! 





-^:^^^4 






/I'/rc irfirinintf up J'ltr the Jirsf Ikiiiic iinnic 

THK FIKLII 

Here's the stage wiiere the colorful pageantry 
of foothall is enacted. The hand pia\s. the crowd 
cheers, the teams struggle, and the whole is 
saturated with the primitive zest of this game of 
enlightened savages. 

4 OAill MEAIiillKK 

If aiivone can pull Rice foothall out id the rut. 
Jack Meagher can. Coming at a timi' when jiros- 
pects were poorer than they have heen known 
lu'rc almost since the first days of the Institute, 
his task appeared well nigh too great for aiiv man 
to co|n' with. 

With six letter -men and a pitifully small group 
of last year's freshmen, he had to fashion a team. 
It was a weak team, as its record shows, hut not 
thru an\ fault of the coach. That leain learned 
foothall. it learned to light, and it learned to 
rcs|iccl the man who coaihed it. Thai team 
showed nice what Meagher can do. and what can 
he expected from him if he is given any support at 
all. Cive him the material he deserves, and Rice 
will have teams to be respected and feared. 



;- --- ■T-. >N f^^ 






„a 



, ."nPB***' 



J3 



, j^rfTSfu^ 



The SQV.XD—Back: llcynulils, \rii()l<l, T^iiiic;isli-i'. I\cmir<l> . 

R. Joni'S. (jlrecn. Willi;itiis. Lciirli, ('.oiim'II. Minis. I*i»\\ci. Ilfn- 

tlerson. 

Middle: Coauli Meaj^lu-r, Calvin. Sawyer. Hiisscll, Caprain 

B. Jones. McCarble, Scott. Pelillils. Cliambers, Lee, Nabors 

FronI: Tbomas. Morfraii, raihi-. \lleti. I'-mk, Lewis. Pmhuic 

Durenberjiher. 

TUB S4|l Al» 

^e startcil iiiir scasini uith a (li|il(iralilc laok 
of material from ulii<li to iikiiiM aiivtiiirii; ap- 
proaching a team wortliv of such an institution 
as Rice. It must have taken a great ileal of cour- 
age on Jack Meagher s ])art to lake the team over 
under the present lircunistanccs. and with a past 
so unpromising. 

Let us forget the record of this team in \icu ol 
the effort it expended in making tliat record. Plie 
season was anvthing hut a huge success, and the 
less saiil ahotit it the lietter. hecause it was one of 
those things that iu>t had to lie. In justice to these 
men. when one remenihers their foes, it must be 
said that thev fought a good fight. Thev were in 
there doing the best thev could, and that is all anv 
man can do. They couldn't come back uith llieir 
shields, so they came back on them. It was not a 
team to be ashamed of. and we can look forward 
to next year with the long heralilcd 'dawn o( a 
new era" at last breakini;. 



V.\ I'TAI > IK I S li;.| O \ KS 

Everyone likes to see a man uho 
lights, and especially is he to Ije 
praised who fights when there seems 
to he little glor\ in the fra\ . Then. 
]iarado\icall\ <'nough. the glor\ is in 
the fighting- ami not in tlie residt. 
Such a man was Hush Jones, of Dal- 
las. ca|>tain of the Owls of l^)2'». 

(Captain Jones would ha\c |iei-n 
All-.Southwestern on a team ulicn- lie 
did not have to constitute a whole 
line in liim-ell. His pla\ wa> everv- 
tiiing that could he desired. In every 
game he was the outstanihng plaver 
for Kice. One can |)av him the highest 
compliment of football, "lie fought 
till the last shot." Never for a mo- 
ment was his fire (pien< bed — and that 
is saying a lot. Jhe defeats that Rice 
suffered in tin' past season would 
ha\c made nne lc^s stout ol lieait Iom' 
courage. 

(■\l''l\l\ .I(im:s 




T H E i> I C / i R E .S 

Right: Kiish. Bill ;iii<l T rn> 

luilfliiis; I hill liiii- :.l SM I 



BELOi\ ; Ciiplain Busli .loin- 
Caplnin-i'livl Bill Moi-an 






l>OVOi..\ :i:t. Kii'E o 

Kice opened the 1030 football season in New Orleans ajiainst 
the Loyola Wolves with a night football game. Playing under 
artificial light was quite a new experience for the team, and 
altho there was almost perfect visibility, there was a strange- 
ness about it all that was not a little disconcerting. It was not 
the same novel experience for the Wolves, and thev unmerci- 
fullv slashed their way to a 33 to victory. They had a fine 
learn, and deserved to win, and in fact, it was only the fighting 
spirit of the Owls that saved them from a worse defeat. Ralph 
Jones and Bush Jones, written up as the "Jones Boys," were 
the stars of the game — Ralph with his terrific drive and gallant 
defence, and Bush "in there" all the time, constantly inspiring 
his team-mates with his lii;hl and hiiih courage. 



Bush Junes 

"Dr." Jones was a man whom all the boys respected for his 
high I'ourage and light, as well as for his fine football. The 
"doctor" likes the ladies and the gentle art of sellintr. 



Hill Morgan 



When the boys elected Bill their captain for next season, 
they could not have chosen a better leader. Tt seems that 
"Father" Morgan is fond of tall glasses of a foam-top|)ed. 
amber fluid and plent\ of leisure. 



i r 1 




1114 ■■: 7. >i.\>l IIOI>>T4»> 2 

Plavinn; fair rnolliall. Iml uitli a wuiM ul lij:lil. Kicc look 
tlii.s ifaiiii' from llii- IJcarkats. 'Pin- uairic ua> iiol >i'n>alioMal. 
but the Owls showed <;reat iiii](rovi"iiii'iil siM(<- tin- ;^ariii' with 
Loyola. I*rrha|)s il was the fact that it was llir lirst fiaiiii- of 
the season on llicir own lii-M that inspired llicrn: al aii\ lale 
thev tnrned in a u(ll-|)la\ <'il <;anie thai j;a\i- ihirn a f;oo(l start 
for the season. 

The score caiiie in the second qnarter. with ken Lei' sweep- 
ing left end. re\ ersirif; his field, and racing; ii.i yards lor the oid\ 
touchdown of the (la\. TlK'n' were inan\ lonf; runs dnrinj; the 
ffame. and Ken sexeral limes carried the hail around liie ends. 
but it was Ralph Jones who battered the liearkal line until 
the\ were ntlerU whipped. Rush was fighting his usual heads- 
ujt gaun'. and il was largely his s])irit and fire thai euahled his 
team-mates to stop dead a great Bearkat offensi\e on the 
three-vard line. In kicking out of danger Kenned\ stepped out 
of bounds and "ave the Bearkats their score. 



Auhrcv Cdltin 

AuhrcN was a dependahle man u ho could al\sa\ s he counted 
on to di> his part. \ubrc\ likes \Ltry. 

I heron (jreen 

"Big"" (ireeu did his best to solve Meagher's tackle prdhlem 
— a most perplexing and disconcerting prohlirn lor a coach. 
Theron likes (Freen. 



T H /•: I' I ( I I R E S 

Lki t: ■ll.isN.- I'.in.aiHl'Hcil"' 
i:iML ll|> III.' S:iin llniisliin lllii'. 



\ii1m.\ Ciilvin, ThcT- 




<:- ■ ■ 



Hit n* 




<1 ■" 






rilE PICTURES 



Right: Ralph iicls away in llii 
A. & M. sailK'. 



I'll I «i\\ rnr!iTit\ I Icnilrrsini. 
Ilalpli .li.,,rs 



(-4 









f \ 








^ ^4'>:4t' 







■IK !•: I I. M»l TIIWEtiiTKII.X U 

In a game inarii-d 1)\ unnecessary roughness. Rice gained 
her first victory ii\cr Southwestern in two years. It had all tiie 
aspects of hiding the grudge game it is said to l)e. One of llie 
Kice [ilavcrs had to he hanished from the game for retahating 
lo Pirate torments, and the Pirate captain was removed on 
the charge of unnecessarv rougiiness. Let us hope tiiat the 
tradition is at an end. 

During llie first quarter tlie two teams hatticd on even 
terms. — in the second .Southwestern scored. This seemed to 
set the ( )u Is on (ire. Ralph Jones hcgan to pound the Pirate 
hue lo hits, and carried the i>ail <k>e]i into .Southwestern ter- 
ritorN. V hitle later Ross kennedv intercepted a jtass and to<»k 
the hail to the 8 yard line. A pass to Mc(.arhle scored a toucli- 
ilown. Rice scored again in the third ipiarter. and was pre- 
vented from further scores oid\ l)\ a series of unfortiniate 
penalties. 



r„ 



llvndr 



rouMn\ had the lough luck of hcing ill at the slart of the 
season, but he finished in great style, playing some good foot- 
hall at the |)ivot. lie likes gum. 

lidljih Jones 

"Mean Looker lo his friends. \nd he did look aulullv 
riicaii hearing down on a tackle with thai terrific drive he 
packed. Ilcilocsul like .Southwestern pla\ers. 



\\t ft (I : f]-; 



R'PI' 




TKXAS :tU. KICK O 

Uii a iiiu(l(l\ licNI and in a (liizzliufi rain a stioni; I'cxas li am 
literally snirariMl the ()uls. In spite of a slippi'r\ liall and a 
treacherous turf, tlie Lori<;liorns ran llie ( )\vls ragjied. and then 
were content to kick onl of danger. The lighter ()\vls were lost. 
Those big Steers ran over, thru and around the Kice team as 
the thev were a hnnch of scruhs. \ game hegun in high ho|ies 
and ended in bedraggled gloom! 

Frank Power has particularK disliked Tevas ever since last 
year, and he lertainK seemed to enj(i\ slannuing those .Steer 
liacks on the groiiml. He was easii\ the outstanding end on ihc 
field, in spite of his weak ankles. .Sco||\ Sau\er. on the oilier 
end. turned in a well-plaved game. 

This game went in twos — two touchdowns resulting hum 
blocked punts, two from long runs, and two from steach 
marches down the lield. Kyen the Texas backhcld hail luo 
stars. Dexter .Shelley and Nona Kees. who took turns about 
scoring. 

Ross Ki'iincily 

One of the most useful men in the hackfield was Ross. He 
was there to block, kick. pass, or run. He likes "pro." 

Krnnelli Lt'v 

A fast little man who deserved a good line in Iront oi him 
and strong interference and liail neither. Ken likes a broken 
field with the ends taken out. 



THE 1> I CrV RES 

I^KFTl Xil'lsoil JiU.'S to Jift a 

Tcxiis L'liivci-sily tnick. 



I'.i:l .)« : II. .^^ Kciiiii'.ly. I\ 
iirll] I 




/*«*, 







J II i: r I CT i li Es 

HliMii: Mi'f.iul.lr itocs up I"! 
a pass in llic Stmllmrslrj n 
fe'ainp. 



Bi-;li)« (iiili.il l.iaili, r.mr^r 
McCarl.lc 



li^ilil 




iit:M 





'M 



•»T. i:i»\v.\iti»«» 24». itiri-: 7 

Here s the old ({iir>li(>n i>l {iM|)il \('isiis Icachcr. It rt'vealed 
liou tlioroiigliK the |iM|)ils luiil learned their lessons, and how 
eflieieiit thev uere in ihe execution of tiieiu. But hv the time 
Jack Meagher gels liis system to working at Rice, the old 
pupils are a|)t to he eclipsed in more ways than one. 

The game was played under an oyereast sky and on a field 
made miidily hv |>reyions rain. This made sensational running 
out of the ipieslion and lirought to hear the terrific line [ilinig- 
ing that the Meagher >\ stem stresses. The Rice line was cvent- 
nally overcome hv the poimding it received from the relentless 
and hard driving St. Kdwards hacks. For Rice- Ralph lones 
\xas doing his share ol line-driving. 

Irank I'owcr got right ami turned in his hesi game up to 
date. Rice s only score was made possihie in the last (piarter 
li\ a series of long passes that \lc( larhle w as ahle to snag, end- 
ing across the goal. 

(iilhcrl Lt'iicl] 

leach ua> not a regular at the start of the season, hnl thru 
hard work hi' soon hecame one. He likes to spit thru liis front 
leeth. 



(; 



McCiiU- 



"(ioriila was alwa\s there when some one was needed lor 
a little fancy pass snagging, lie likes to catch passes that seem 
impossihie. 



1 



I 




T. 4 . I . 2 I. 1114 K » 

If llif liclil had iiol liriMi riiiiililx and llii- ^'. ic> (li(i|i|)inf; rain 
inteniiitti'nllv . it is shaiiieful to think uhat the scene might 
liave been. (1\ I. eland was pre\enled iiimi making his sensa- 
tional long inns li\ more than jnsl the Kiee ( )x» Is. lint u ith the 
aid of till' (dements. tlie\ succeeded \ er\ uell in keeiiinj: liirn 
from making iiis customary gains. 

Frank Power was easily the outstanding end on the Held, 
turning in a good olfensi\ e and a great defensiye game. Theron 
Green was in there liallling all the way. and so «as Hilix 
Morgan. Morgan had to do the kiiking as well as ])la\ in the 
line, and it was his toe that staved off several touchdowns 
that seemecl inMiiineut. The soggv ground slowe<l down |{al|ili 
.Tones a great deal, ami kejit him from making his cnslomar \ 
gains. Ken Lee eould never get going on the wet. sliiiiierv lield. 



Hrruh- 



Mini: 



In s|>il<' ol a natinal aw ku ardnc,->. \rkansas made a good 
football player before the season ended. His fiery head was 
always shining in the thickest of the fra\. He likes |)igskin> 
beeause they remind him so n 



mucli ot Home 



Inink l'()n<r 

"Bia<k Iraiik" was a potential \ll-SouthHc-lirri cud. Iiul 
he was ke|)t back b\ a pair ol weak ankles that just would not 
go. He can't help it if all the ladies like him. 



7 // /: /' / c r V RES 



l-l.l I Kill shmip^ 
A. v\ \I lliii-. 



Bk;.0\\ : II.MMh 



ISO II \l irns, 




i:.\ 



op 



^ nf) 



T H E P I C r [RE S 



Micnr: lliUpli Irics an ciul run 
M^'iiiiisl Si. Kdwjirds. 



Iti:,.,.» ; N.'lsnri lliiss.ll. 11,.,'- 
hiTl Sa«\. r 





A. «: .>l. -Hi. nUK » 

VfjainsI llicir traditional rivals Ki(<' liiiiii'd in a stiililiiiriilv 
fought game that was worthy of a better end. The Aggies had 
lieen iiaving a rather tough season too, and decided to take it 
(iMl on llie Owls. They carried out their decision in a devastat- 
ing fashion, iho the f)wls succeeded in hauling them on even 
terms lliru the first ijuarter. A fundile at the end of the (piarter, 
recovered l)v \. tK M.. paved the wav lor an Aggie touchdown 
soon after the second (|uarter began. 

It was onlv after a great drive and some sensational pass 
snagging hv McClarhle. climaxed bv Ralph Jones slashing 
drive olf-taikle. that Rice was able to score at all. In tiie fonrtii 
quarter, just when it looked as tho the Owls would .score again 
Mills inti-rcepted another Kice pass an<l raced for the third 
\ggic touchdown. 

M\cr\ man on the team turned in a good game, but among 
I lie outstanding players were Bill Morgan, Red Thomas, Frank 
I'ower. "(iorilla" McCarble, and of course. Bush Jones. 



\,'lsnn RussrII 

Nelson had a lougli spol l<> lill. and lie diil it to tin' hi'st of 
lis aliililN . and thai was all ri"hl. He likes to dance. 



[[crlifi I Sonwr 

"Scoltv"' plaved a good game at end all season. He should 
i good rie\t year, lie likes his nickels. 



Btfi 1 «n » 



I 




S.M.I . :ii. iii«-k: o 

I he powerful ^^llstan^s had little trouhli- in |iiMinilin^ llie 
Rice team to bits. Hoastiiig potentially one of the strongest 
teams in the Conferen<e. and with many indiyidual stars, it 
is a wonder that tlie\ did not heat ns worse tiian liiev did. 
The Owls tried eyery angle of foothall strategy. onU to he 
frnstrated at each turn. Only once did Kiee come near the 
S.M.U. goal, and tluMi the\ only rea(li<-d the twent\ ->econd 
yard line. 

Bill Morgan was the star of this game. S.M.U. seems to he 
the op|)ouent that calls forth the best that is in Bill, and 
there is a little reser\e in eyery athlete. Next year uateh Bill 
get right against those Mustangsl Thomas and Henderson, 
alternating at center, turned in haug-np games. 



Jack Sroll 

.Tai'k was green at the heginniug of the season, hut he learned 
enough football to start some (d the games toward the last. 
Ever since the Ba\ lor game he has wondered what the dilfcr- 
ence was between the impact of Bush Jones driying lor a tackle 
and a freight train. 



Paul Smilli 

I'aul was alwa\> reads uheu some neat |)as- Hinging ua^ 
needed. He is tin' blond menace to tin- hearts (d \mericari 
^'^ omanhood. 



7' // /-; /' / C T I R E S 



I^eft: Till' line iiilcs up ill llie 
St. tldwarils i;,irii.-. 



.III. kS. oil. l';iijlSlllllll. 



i!»iil^^ 








THE PI CTIKES 

HH-in\ .\:A,- WilsoEl liTls i.lV a 
plllll ill t lir I'iiyior l:;iitic 



P,l-,I... 

Willii 



Tlioniiis. ("nil 




■««»il 





II.WI.OK l!>. KI4 E O 

This was Hiffs last anil l>esl game of the season. Stiihlponilv 
fighting the team that at the start of tiie season was touted as 
the conference ihampions. Rice can trnlv sav that she lost the 
game on breaks. 

( )iicc Tiieron Green intercepted a pass with a clear held for 
a touchdown anri was not fast enough to capitalize on his op- 
portunity. Anotlier time McCarble caught a pass only a few 
\ards from the goal hut stundded and was unahle to recover 
ipiicklv enough, \gain. Ken Lee was off for a long end run and 
was tripped in sight of the goal. 

Bush ,|oues played his last game witii tiic iiigh courage and 
spirit that has characterized his play during the entire season, 
and indeed, his whole intercollegiate career. Billy Morgan and 
(iillicrt Leach turn<Ml in great games for Rice, as did (ieorge 
McGarlile and Kalpli .lones. 

Emn Tlionias 

"Red" played a great game at center all season. He was 
cool ami de|)cndahle under fire. He likes the latest things to 
help liim keep his sartorial |>erfection. 

Ct'cil /I illiiiiiis 

"Tin\ " uorked liard and proved that lie had a lot ol good 
football in his system, lie Imiied in some good play at tackle 
and improved steaililx . He likes hig. hliie overcoats witii big, 
liiack buttons. 



»1 



•*n 



i'. 




T II /• /' / CT r H i:s 

Li;i I Tliis is Ihr Im'irIi lllal 
liol.K l!ie r.-s.TVi'. 



WATKKItOV 

Slim.- Crollonl did his liit In tide llic uairims llir(>ii;;li llic 
strife. A drink ol ualcr restores ;i iiiaii Udiidi-rlidK in a lii>l. 
Iiard-I()iij;lit cnnli'sl. 

Ill KK.MIEIKiillKII 

(joacli Mar\iM I )Mrenlper;:lier u as a star Imilliall |ila\er al 
Si. I'.duards I iii\('rsit\ at Viistiri under jack Mi'a^lier lielore 
he eanie to Kiee to assist Meagher in his efforts to |)nt out 
winning: teams for Rice. Newspaper writers hailed Dnren- 
hergher a> tlie outstanding end in Texas his last \ ear at St. 
Edwards University. Auv man who has played against him 
will giye witness that those ham-like hands of liis can deal a 
terrifie blow. He was what Meagher ealls a "nift\ '" end. 

lie is trained in the Meagher s\^lem and is tlioroughlx 
eapalile ol imparling that training. .So eager was lie to see the 
team in eondition and thoroughU traineil in their position 
that the hoys nicknamed him Simon Legree. Mnl e\cr\ 
man knew ihat this was hest anil really were at heart |)roud to 
he working under such a man. 

Maryin should prove in\alnal)le to his former mentor. Our 
hopes regarding the future accomplishments of these two men 
along with otlu'r memhers of the coaching stall, ari' high: and 
if they get support, they will make Southwestern Conference 
teams fear Rice more than has heen true in many years. 



l',l:]...u : Call Cn.lVdr.i, C.ac li 
Mai N ill IliinMil>rr?jli<r. 




k1 



rs 



..' :ro& 




y '^ 



Q'j L . ^ * 







BASKETBALL 



T 



> 



■dh. 



^ ^J- 



T II i<: I i> :t o >» i<: A >i <» > 

Ki'i;;u'(lli'ss III u luilcNcr consiila- 
lioii llir l\icc lui^kclliall team iiia\ 
liave lelt (j\rr il> \ikansas viitoiv. il 
must be ailniilli-il lliat the VKW 
season was not a sueeess insolar a> 
confercncr -landing; i> concerneil. To- 
wards llic criil ol llic season il ua> 
llumi;'hl llial Kiee slood an <'\cellenl 
ilianie lo tie lor lliird |>laee. lloHe\<'r. 
llic loss of till- lasl ■;aine. pins oilier 
npsels in llie eonli'renee. sInillliMl llie 
a\erai;es lo sn<li an extent tlial Kiif 
was foreed lo >liare llie cellar jiosilion 
witli its areli-ri\ al. !'.( '..I'. 

<)ut of llie lsxeiil\ ij;anies. non- 
eonreri-nie and eonlerenee. thai were 
|)la\i-d. Kiee won liMi. Tliis is |jerha|ps 
the best reeord an I nstitute basketball 
team has made lor si'veral years. \<l 
il realK seems llial more games should 
ha\e been uon. Two games from 
V.iKM.. one Ironi ['.(^.I'.. and om- 
Irom \rkansas made n|> Riees eon- 
lerenee \ ielories. 

CdvcM I'l i;' KM i;in:iin ^ 





I'hr \inhliinum I'.tmrl ii'iih llir hisl fofilfrftifi' iinmi' iinilrr iriiy. 

( )ne of the briglil features of the season was the 
lael that llie two leading scorers in the eonlerenee 
were Kice niiMi. Jake Hess, sterling forward and 
ea|il a in-elect, led the field with a total of I Ii5 points 
while Ra\ liar! was second with 107 points. Both 
(d ihese players were chosen for AII-< Conference 
leanis: Hess, ineidentlv. was giyeii honorable 
mention for \ll-\merican. 

At the close ol the season an Alumni lianipiet 
was giyen for the basketball sipiad. al wlii<li lime 
Mr. Hess was presented the Slewarl l{o\ li's tro- 
phy for in(li\idnal honors in scoring. Il was at 
lliis banipiel ihal Mess was chosen the l').!l leader. 

( )iie of ihi- inleresting lights of the season found 
ils source in a rallier serious doemnent which the 
members ol llie s(piad signed during the early 
pari ol llie season. The gist o( this doi'imienl was 
llie solemn a\owal ol each |)laver lo relrain from 
slia\ing unlil ihe leani had won two eonlerenee 
\ ielories. I nforlunalelv. seyeral members of the 
>ipiad were forced lo sport rather hea\\ beards 
before the second game was won. 

The services of Iwo lettermen. tJaptain Zuber 
and '"Red" 'riiomas will be lost to the 1931 squad. 
\el with ihe addition of such promising niali'rial 
Irom ihe star Ireslnnan sipiail. (!oacli DaiighiTilv 
should be able lo m<dd a learn ne\l Mar llial will 
really come into ils ow n. 



■] '^^./ 



^z 



rc'i'i 




,.ll 



\l. 



\..l 



I 111. ^..1 M. /,.!./, Ix 

DauglicM-ily (CiiiH'li), 

Mirlrllr: H. Ihirl. K. I lull. W.iil, SI k 

h'nml: Mil -.iiihl.-, Ilrss. Zljliri' I ( '.iiplMilil. T\ i;ls 

4 AI'TAI.-V l»AVII» XriKKIC 

( jilriiiruiliii^ lii> liafkclliall career l>% leailiiiii 
llieOuls lliroii^li llie 1"^)30 seasim. Captain l)a\i<l 
Zulier |pi()\e(l iindoiihledlv to he one of llie out- 
staiidiiii; j;iiarils in llie eonferenee. /nber has 
|ila\eil liis allolleil ihree years of varsit\ ioni|ieli- 
tion anil eonse(|ui'n[l\ his sei\ ices will lie Inst to 
the ()wls next season. Needless to sa\. this loss is 
keenl\ felt bv (^oaeli Daui|;heritv. who now has 
the task hefore him of developinj; a man to take 
"Znhv s" |)laee. 

Captain Znher did not loom ont as a llash\. 
grandstand player, hnt as a cool, steady, elear- 
headeil leader. Tini<' after time he saeriliced per- 
sonal glory for the sake of the team. Znher had 
perhaps the best long-shot on the team, yet he 
rareU used it. prelerring to u ork the liall doun 
the floor in order that the forwar<ls might open 
up for "erip shots. Zuher was greatl\ haiiili- 
eapped hy his laek of height, partienlarh against 
the Texas and \rkansas teams, yet he managed 
for the most part to hold his own against his taller 
opponents. 



4 .\i>T.-i:i.K4 T .i.\Ki<: iii<:ss 

l'la\iiig his second \ear of \arsit\ 
competition, this head\ liltic loruard 
ha;- already gained entrance to the 
Hail of Fame in Southwest ( '.onfer- 
ence haskethall. Competing against 
such liistory-makiiig stars as Wear 
Sciioono\er of Arkansas and "Uig- 
nii l{ose of Texas. .lake took indi- 
dividnal honors in high point scoring 
for the I'Cil) season, lie amassed a 
total of ll.'i points in the 12 confer- 
ence games played, an a\ erage of 
nearly 10 points per game. ^ et .lake 
aKvays subordinated himself to team- 
play. That Hay Hart. .lake's running 
mate, scored 107 points is ample eyi- 
(lence of .lake's splendid floor work. 

Iless easily- earned a position on 
I In- Southwest Conference mythical 
all-star team, and he also receised 
honorable mention for \ll-\merican 
from Les (Jage. Sports I'.ditor for the 
( iollcgi' Humor Magazine. 

(AI'TMN l)\\ II) Zl l'.i;ii 




e. 



Til L I'ICri RE S 

Hlcin; ZuI.it is L'Uiiid.-d liy 
MrC.ail.l.-. uhil,' H,i> IhnI 
l<.,.k-<i.,i 



III I o\\ : ("iiplnin D;iviH Ziihrr. 
I ■.;,,, I,iill-rl,>,i .l.lkr TI.-SS. 





Tiii<: TKXAK <<>i<:ii I !<:<>> 

Starliii;; I lie si;imiii with a whirl-wind sinasli. Toxas took 
lilt' first •laiiic lioiii Kice with a lopsided score of 30 to 21. Be- 
loir the Kicc haul realized what had happened, (lie Long- 
horns ran U|i a lead of nine points. Coaeh Walkers fainons 
"shuttle def<-nse was used to perfeetion wliili' the Longliorn 
five-man ollense swept <louri the field time after lime with 
deadly aeeuraey. The Texas team was hot on its shots and 
Kiee was forced to play a defensive game from the start. 

The .second game was one that will long be remembered by 
the Longhorns. The slogan "Kiee Fight Never Dies" was 
forced upon the Austin fans in such a way as never before. Tn 
fact, the Rice fight eonlinued even after the final whistle had 
blown. The Owls pla\e(l a har<l. determined, methodical game, 
riie score stood in Kiel's favor until the latter part of the last 
half, at which timi' \lc(!arhle and Hart were ousted from the 
game on fouls. The olil Kicc fight continued, however, and it 
was with great dillic ull\ that the heavier Texas |ila\crs man- 
aged to lialler their wa\ to \ ictor\ . The final si-orc was .11 to 2.3. 
Texas. 

TIIK S.M.IT. SEHiK*^ 

The first S.M.IL game was soinewhal discouraging to the 
Kiee fans as it looked as though the ( )w Is had fallen into anolli- 
er one of their one point jinxes. The final score was II to Iff in 



i 



-» i 



I 



I'j .-J 




/•///•: I'ICTLRES 

l,].i t: 'liiil" U.inncrrinil Frilz 
Hurl in M< lion 



la\<>r of .S.M.L . Hotli teams loiiccntrattMl llieir attciiliinis 
upon scorini:. liltic defensive work evideiicini; itself on eilliir 
side. The liigli. one-armed, side sliots of the Ponv captain. 
Brown, were largely responsible for S.\r.U.'s victory. The two 
Ifart bovs plaved wonderful offensive hall lor I he ( )«ls. scoring 
more than half of Rice's points. 

The second S.M.L . game was a cold. drear\ affair. The tem- 
perature outside the Mustang gvm registered 0° F. and the 
healing facililics in the hiiilding were unsalisfactorv. The 
players were gi\en hiankels during the time-out periods in an 
attempt to conserve any heal which they might have general- 
ed. On account of the extreme coldness the gaitie was a hil 
ragged in spots. Tlie final score was 31 to 2H in S.M.I ."s fa\or. 

TIIK .\. & ->!. •tKIIIKS 

Rice took hoth of the A.tV M. games. The first game was 
plaved at College Station and the Rice hus. which had no 
healing apparatus, was an hour or so late in reaching its <lcs- 
tination. As a result, the Rice leam was forced to take ihc 
lloor before it bad a chance to warm up. Once the game started, 
however, the Owls became quite hot. Tliev ran up a lead ol 
eight points before the Cadets could get ihcir hearings. It was 
in this game that "Gorilla" McCarble. llic conference's most 
"fightingest performer, came into his own. (iorilla phixcd 

center and covered the court like a circus tent. The score >l I 

23 to 17 at the end of the game. 



Iril/ Ihirl. liiix M;mI. 




M -^ ^. 



7'// F. i> I CT I hi: s 

I I : Ijlllr .l.ikr Mr.. Ii,,., 

Id |);is> ;i[L>liml II.IIIA \i)rill,ltl 



li ] I ,, « ; C-.ili;,- \l,(\ill.lr 





The second game was iiiiicli like llic first. The Rice Icaiii 
[ilaM'il laster. snioDllicr liaskelliall than ili<l tlu' (ladi'ts and il 
was siin|il\ a inatt<'r of \\ lieii the final w hisllc wonid lilou . Tlii' 
-.cori' «as2(i Id IT In la\(>r(>t Rice. 



TIIK T.4'. r. SKIIIKK 

In till' first 'r.(!.L . i;aiiie the Owls were deeidedU (itT form 
liolh olTensivelv and defensi\elv. Hail it not heen lor the stel- 
lar uork of .lake Hess. Riie forward, the ( )wls wonlil ha\ e heen 
hopelessK swani|ied. .lake guarded and drihhied well, at limes 
^-iiikinj; allots that seemed well nijih im|)os>ihle. The <;ame end- 
ed XA to 2! in fa\or of T.C.U. 

Tlie !-ei-onil r.(!.l . jiame was a sonree of considerable satis- 
fai lion lo Rice fans in that the Owls had finally succeeded in 
uirniiiifi a conference game hv one point. Hitherto Rice had 
managed to lose a large nundier of gaiTies hv this narrow mar- 
gin, iml had heen imahle to win an\. The ( )w Is |ila\ed i I. 

deliherale haskelhall. while the Krogs seemed lo go all to 
|iiece> during the last several minutes o( [liav. Harry Norman 
and "Red" Thomas played great hall for the ()wls in the final 
iiiomciits ol the lra\ and much ol the creilit for this victory he- 
lori^s lo lliem. 



Till-: lt.\VI.4»ll •tKIIIES 

II CM'r a ha>kelhall game -hould ha\ e heen won Ip\ a learn. 
Rice should sureU ha\e taken ihe lir-l ^ame from lia\ lor. rhe 



"i 




( )\\ U were one |i(iint alirail ulicii. uillionU lliirU H'Cdiuls Irl I 
to pla\ . a Kice |)la\rr acciileiitalU fouled Kierskv. Ba\ Im 
gviard. who was drilililiiif; llip ball. Kierskv made liis foul slmi 
good and the second half ended a feu seeonds later. In the ad- 
ditional fi\e-rninute period the Riee team went to [jieees and 
the seore linallv moimled up to -S-i to 27 in liax lor's faM>i. 
In the ^eciind contest the Bavlor team up>el all |>revailiiig 
do])e anil deh'aled Rici' in one of the must speetacuhir gauie> nl 
the season. The '"Might\ ' Alford. star liavlor forwanl. plaxcd 
wonderful hall ior the Rears and iiis shooting was largei\ re- 
sponsiliie for the Owl's defeat. The score was II to M. Ba\lcir. 



THK .\ICK.\.>S.\«« •^KIIIK.S 

\rkansas won the first game fnim the (Iwls onl\ after an i\- 
ceedingK harrl tussle. The ()wls fnught an u|i-hill hattle. hiil 
it was only after ^ ear Selioono\er. tin- |iauther-like \rkansas 
forward, had dribbled time after time through a lab\rinth of 
Rice players that the Razorbacks were able to triumph. Ihr 
score was .30 to 26. Arkansas. 

The second game was one that uill long hi- remcmhered lis 
Rice fans. Kverv player on the ( )« I team seenicil k(\ed up fur 
this particular game. The great defensive work of Captain 
Zuber was one of the outstanding features of the contest. Time 
after time the sturdy captain was seen to leaj) high in the air 
to take the ball off the backboard and prevent the taller Ar- 
kansas players from getting rebound shots. The game ended 
37 to 1() ill Rice's fa\()r. This was the worst d<'feal that an 
Arkansas team had suffered in many years. 



Ill E I' I ( T I l{ i: S 

I.Kn: ll.-.j' llHini.i:, .ill, I 
liM> Hill -r lor :i liirhllr 



HlJiiu : i;i;iii ■|-li,,i,Ni-.. \lali.i 
^.1 ■ l'.ii,l.l\- l\cililri,k «l,. 
shioil uhli Ihr Irani in I In 
-illa\illi; \o\\ 













fc- 




R 



K 



< <»Arii K. w. ii.ii<:itTiKi:it4; 

Faiiu'd lor his ;il)ilit\ and sui(<'ss 
as a rumier. and liir his a(((>m|phsh- 
ineiils in developing men in tiaek and 
liehl alhliMics. he ha> clindied lo llie - 
Ironl rank, ol his |)rof<'ssion. an ae- 
eoniplishnienl *vhi(li is nol the work 
of a dav or a ucek oi- a \ear. Mter his 
ou n |iarliei|ialioii in track, and lol- 
louinj; an earlv e\|ierien<-e coachiiif; 
athletic clnhs in the Kast. he was en- 
gaged as coach of the Irish- \nierican 
Club of New ^ ork. L ndcr lljertberg 
the ilid) won ever\ National \. \. I . 
chani|iionslii|p and in I'HI!! contrihnl- 
ed largel\ to the succ<'ss of the \nieri- 
can ()l\ni|iic Team. Later a coach at 
Colinidiia I niversit\. his teams de- 
feated Eastern i-oljcgo in chial meets 
and relay races. (Joach Krnie gained 
his position in Trackdoni hv the snc- 

cuvcii ii,ii:iri-i!i;it(; 





-I ilntil un'cl uriflrr iifiv nn Hiff l-'irtil 

less of his teams in Olympic Games from l')l)f> to 
1024. and many of his pupils are still yiclors in 
their lii-Ms. Coach at Kice during \\>2l} and l')2T. 
he w as hionghl hack in the spring of l')2'^^) lo carry 
on the work which he had toimdi'd. 

TIIK FIKIJI 

\n important part of a students life centers 
about this well-known sjiot. Here nian\ an ex- 
pectant audience ha^ watched: nian\ an ari\ious 
athlete's heart ha> hop<-d. Here aipide.- the -cliool 
ol the coaches, and those who report tor work with 
an end in yiew and follow the spirit ol this place — 
that sjiirit which has grown Iroin the iellowship ol 
one another, the dcNotion to their school and from 
the lo\ e ol sport and pla\ . 

iAi»T.vi> k.>i.>ii<:tt Itltl .>>tO> 

The Track Team of l'>2'' en|o\ c<l the leadiM>hip 
of one who has been during three seasons Kices 
most able and ardent wearer ol the >pikcd -hoes. 
\ot too small a part of the fort imc of Track \th- 



r ^ -y 



I 




The S(;>l^\l> — Back: Jones, Manuel, Walls, Mh-^^^^s, keil<lrii:k, 

Lamkin, Allen, Bracey. 

Center: Eagle, Flynn, Business iNIaiiager Gaylord .rohnson. 

Captain Brunson, Coach Hjertberg, Willis, Hilliard, Yar- 

brough, McCarble. 

F/-on/; Jacobe, Landers, Wliiuery, Wilniolh, Kaplan, Woi-thani 

Hamilton, Reynolds. 



letics is to he attiil>iiti'<l hiiri fur liis riianv victories 
in Intersclioiastic. Collegiate and National com- 
petition. At one time rated the greatest middle 
distance runner in the country, this strong-heart- 
ed, beautifully striding <^\vl holds the Conference 
record for the 880 ^ aril Run and is joint holder of 
the Mile record. In his eagerness and sincerity, he 
was an inspiration to his team-males. — in his con- 
sistency and natural ability always a satisfaction 
lo his coach and followers. 

THE SKASOX 

The Conference champions of l')28 began train - 
ins for the '29 season under the tutelage of the 
man who had trained and inspired them to the 
championship during the past season. Coach 
Claude J. Rothgeb. Haying lost seven lettermen_ 
six of whom were seniors, the team was without 



the necessary material required to 
fill out a well balanced team, since 
only a fe« new-comers were a\ailablc 
from the Freshman team. After sever- 
al weeks of conditioning, there was 
much ilislurbancc in cani|) when the 
coach of till- ( )« l> was released at his 
own request with the ex|)iratiou of his 
contract. Fortunately for Rice, thcv 
were able to regain their coach of l')2() 
and U)27. Ernie W. Fljertberg. who 
joined the team at once, and began 
work in the face of his late start. Had 
it not been for the enthusiasm which 
had come to lie a vital |>art i>f the en- 
tire team it would June ln^en bad (or 
the Running ( )w Is. for little had been 
done and nuich was expected of them. 
By the close of March, several strong 
relay teams had been developed and 
were entered in the pre -season games. 
Of interest this vear was the institu- 
tion of the S. M. U. relay games, to 

CUACH liHCNSUN 




"^t «cr 



1 




4 :v>i 



I 



V V '■ z^ *a fc^ 



THE PI CT L RES 

HidirT; Brurison in lull slridr; 
BracL'y lotivinf;^ i\w losl of llu- 
lii'lil far behind in llir lunldifil 



Bi-:r,o\v : Ciiplain Pirunsoii. Caii- 
Inin-clocl Bracry. 





take place in Dallas anil be an annual ailair. rejdacing llie 
SonlliHcst Relays originated bv Rice. 

Tbe Owls won but one of tbe ibree dnal meets, however the 
losses were by close scores, and in the conference champion- 
ships they finished third, losing second place by a bare 2^2 
points. The record is hardly a fair estimate of the team, con- 
sidering the level of competition, the outcome of each event as 
«ell as each meet, and their lack of strength in the field events. 

TUB K.WLOK MHKT 

W llli an ease which appeared to be the result of their con- 
ference chanipiorisbip of last season, the Uliie and Gray speed- 
sters defeated tbe Ha\ lor Bears for the third consecutive year 
in dual competition. The score was 743/2 to 423^, and was a 
great sendoff for the Owls in their first dual meet of the season. 
The Rice team took every first place on the track and almost 
ibe same number of second places, Bavior uinning but three. 
In the field events, however, the Baylor Boys showed the same 
consistency as the Rice runners and won four of the six first 
places and allowed the Owls only two seconds. The outstanding 
performance of tbe meet was tbe wiiniing of the 100 \ ard dash 
b\ (Maude Bracey in which he equalled tbe accepteil world's 
record of 9 3/5 seconds. Sixteen Rice men scored in tbe meet. 



-. ! * 




r II E I' I CI i RES 

I.i:it: TI... i;,c,- is .Lisc ^.1 llir 
lliiid hur.llr wilh I'.c^ks ;inil 

III.- SKflics. 



THK A. A .>l. MKUT 

Till- \j;;iies ucrc our visitors on a (lav thai ii'iiiindeil lis \ti\ 
iiiucli ol the oiii- the vcar hetViif. and wlien the inci'l ua?- umi 
tlie \<;iii«'S hail uuii h\ ahuost ihc same srori-. 

Ki<i' hvcil ii|> 111 il> ii'|inlalion on ihr tiark h\ winniii;; ll\r 
ol ihr iiiiii- events. Imt at thi' ^aiiii- linn- thi-\ ui'ir alili' to lakr 
fii>l in i>nl\ onr ol llu' llflil rvi'iits. The Aggies sle[)|)eil lo ihe 
froiil in the nuniher of Hist plaees winning the other nine, ami 
gained enough seconds to give iheni their final lead ol 21 
points. The sensation of the ineil was the \irtor\ ol (iaplain 
Bninson and .larohe when tlii'\ ontilistaiued the larinrr lim- 
ners in lioth the H8() \aril and mile runs. Walls id' Kire Mined 
onr onl\ first plaee in field events li\ taking the high jump, and 
Harlan of \. X M. niaile the hest showing of the ilav again?.! 
time ill the 120 sard hnrdles. Bracev and .laeolie of Riee and 
Farmer of A. iS VI. won first plaees in two i-mmiIs to tie for high 
point honors. 'Pen Hiee men sioreil lo make I!' points agaiii^l 
the Aggies' W. 

the: tk.v.vs .>ii<:et 

Pile Knnning ( )u Is met the Texas Lni\ersil\ Traek Team 
al \ii-tin in the last dual ini'et of the si'ason. W ith ver\ lillle 
speenlation as In the final oiileome of the meel. the e\eid\ 




-A jk .1 i~» .^ 



THE PICT I RES 

Rkjiit: Practice sees many a 
t'lijrlU of liurdles and many a 
lap on Ihf Irack. 



Hkiou : llainillnii. Ililliar.l 





riKili'licd teams f<)iij;lu every event to a elose finish witli tiie 
Texas team cominf; out on the top side of tiie score and show- 
iii;i a vengeance lor the defeat snffered hist \ear on the Rice 
Irack. To one reachiif; an acconni of the mei't it would seem 
that the Rice l)ovs were easily outclassed on all sides, and while 
the unexpected did happen as it will, the Texas team was forced 
to extend themselves to the limit in gaininf; the victorv of 74 
to li!. \gain the ( (w Is (ailed to come throu;.'li in the field e\ enls. 
winning only one first place and one second. Rice barely won 
llie hest of the track events taking four firsts and five seconds 
\»liile Texas was taking five firsts and three seconds. 

The surprise of the meet was the iinusiialU fast race of (iiiflin 
of Texas in the 880 yard run in which he defeated Brunson 
with a time of one minute and 58 seconds. Bracey again led 
ihe ()uls with wills in tli<' dashes. Baldwin of Texas was the 
iiidi\idual high point man of the meet taking firsts in the dis- 
cus, till' shot put. and the high hurdles. 

THK C O.XFKIIK.XI E 3IKKT 

The Texas Aggies of the A. & M. College entered one of the 
strongest and well halanced t<'ams in the historv of Southwest 
<<)iiipelitioii and realized this iiH-rit hv gaining the conference 
( rown for the IM29 season. Tiie Rice team entered the meet as 
defending cham|)ions. but failed to get hetti'r than third place. 



r. i 



d 



I . 




rUv scores in the meet for eacli team were: I'cxas \. iX M. 
58 1 4. Texas University 39 1 2. Riee M. i{a\ lor li :i I. 'I\( :.L . 
8. Arkansas 7 1 2. S.M.I . (<. I'lie seemiiij; (faliire of llie meet 
was tlie defeat of Clauile Bracev li\ ( !v Leiand of !'.(:. I . in 
tlie 22(t yard dasli. since this was tlie first defcal of tin- Kice 
star dnring his collegiate career. 

Leo Baldwin. (Captain of the Texas learn, was ihc oii(staii<l- 
inj; individnal of tlie meet uiniiiii;; hij^h [loinl honors with 13 
points, lie was first in the shot, rclainin;: his championship in 
that event as well as in the discus and uas second in the high 
hnrdles. Bracev was second with eight points uinning the 100 
yard dash and finishing second in the 220. 

A second to the upset of Bracev «as the dclcal of Kmmelt 
linmson in the 880 vard run. MtiT uiiuhng the mile c\cnl. he 
uas ahlc to «in onl\ thinl place in the hall. \\ illis was the oid\ 
other Kice man to gain a first place and this he diil l>\ leading 
the field in the two-mile rnn. This was almost a Bice event for 
the ( (w Is placed Hilliard second and ^ arhroiigh fourth. A dis- 
qualification in the high jump kejit Kiic from uiiniing second 
place in the meet. Watts of Rice was the lone jumper to clear 
the har at six feet and that he accomplisln-d four limes only to 
he disqualified in the end, after heing asked to jninp again for 
four consecutive times. This left a four ua\ tic lor first jdace 
in the event, two heing Texas nn-n and Kice not scoring at all. 



THE PI CT I H ES 

Left: Jacobe [losiiiy oul lli iin- 
soa to take a first in tin- li;iU" 
mile; Bush .liMifs tlirtiwiiiL: iIh- 
javelin. 



I'.I.ICU : .hirul.. 




• t^ 



T H K P I C r I ' R E S 

Hlciil : l.-ipiikiiilc^iilslwulciiili- 
rnalcs I'l will I III' 110 iigiiiLisl 
Baylor. 



I.iiiiikl 



MrCirl.lr 





Kiisscll .laoobe. soplioiiiore middle distance runner, scored six 
|i(iinls lor Rice \t\ finisliiiif; second in llic HHO yard dash and 
the mile rnn. a remarkahle showing for the first year of com- 
petition. Stuart Lanikin ran a great 140 to finisli second almost 
in a dead iicat. Herbert Allen threw third for Rice in the shot 
[)ul. and llie mile relay team took third place in that eyent. Of 
the eleven Rice men scoring in the meet, six are seniors and 
uill he lost from next years team. 

INcw conference records were established by Farmer of 
\. (S. M. with a broad jump of 23 feet 10 inches, and Floyd of 
A. i!( M. witli a throw of 204 feet 4 1/2 inches with the javelin. 
The Aggies also won six of the fifteen first places and scored 
luo or more points in eyery eyent but one to make their vic- 
tor\ most decisiye. 

The closing of this meet brought to a close the athletic par- 
ticipation of six wearers of the R. With every effort toward the 
onliiimc of their team, and with every thought centered about 
the last tr\. as one goes to his mark or addresses his lichl there 
comes a feeling never to be forgotten. One brief resume flashes 
of the past and all that it has been, and then the realization 
that soon it will all be over. NX'ithout a sound — the last event. 
And then (]a|(laiii KnHn<'tt Uruuson. Herbert \llen. Larry 
Hamilton, George Reynolds. Horace Watts, and Jack Yar- 
brough take ofl' the spiked shoe of conference competition. 



m ^ 



L ._. 




Til F P I CT V l< F.S 

L]-ri ; Vi II IK cl.-iirim; I hr l.iir 
in III.' hl:;h-iiiiii|, llrNiiul.isiiiiil 
Liilllkill piissiii4; lllr liiiloii 



.x<».\-4 o>i i<:iKi<:.\ri<: 4 4»>ii>i<:titi4»> 

Com|K'tition in track utkI litld cNciits is Imsed [iriiMaiiK uii 
iiidiviiliial effort and dfsirr to win. In relay races the incinlieis 
of a team experience llie llirill id iiiiidiined ellorl> and desires 
lo win. and enjoN the s|piril that nii^ht he known lo olhei- 
sports as teaniuork. I'dr thii- reason |)erha|is. rela\ racc> are 
more exciting and interesting e\en to tlie spectators than are 
some of tlie e\ents of iiidi\i(hiai endeavor. With the comple- 
tion of the pi-ehrtiinar\ woi'konl^ and eai'l\ ^caMHi con<htioii- 
iiig. interest hegins to foens on rela\ comhiiiations and possi- 
hihties. In 142*'. Kice. as in other seasons. «as to have one 
strong relav team. This \('ar it was to he a nniversitv medlc\ 
team when' it had hcen dnring several seasons a uirniing hmr- 
inile team. Not to he forgotten hv themselves or their team- 
mates was the famous "crack"' relav team — a sprint condiina- 
t ion made up the mile reia\ mendicrs and (llaiidc Hrace\ . riii' 
Owls were read\ lor their lirst participation uith the npciiing 
at Viistin of the Texas Kelays. Braeev hegan his seconil \ear of 
competition li\ winning the 100 ^ ard dash and ecpialling the 
^).6 seconds of ( 'harlie I'addock. \ Innr mil<- rela\ team id the 
Hhie and (Tra^ carried awav medals lint the "crack " team 
missed a place \t\ onlv a second. ( )ii the following da\. the 
iiianv national entries moved to the S.M.I . Rela\s at Dallas 
and here again Hracev won liie sprint e\eiil and hetlered the 
odicial worlds record of '). I ,-econil>. The ( >w I ineille\ Icaiii 



[Ilil.DW : llc'.MIIlllls. W.lllM. 




THE PIC T I R F. ,s- 

Hi(;ii r; \\ illis, pii?iuier tiis- 
liinri' iiKiii of IIk' conference, 
sels ii f'iisl |i;ue. Kollowinji him 
are Arnold and ^ ailuouf4ii. 



Ili:i<.\\ : W Mlis. ■*! arhi'. 




A i 




look ^^'(■(1I1(I |)la((' ill tli<» lle^^ int'illi"\ dislaiice and fought tlie 
(Chicago team to a close finish. \lr. Kiiiite l^ockne, famous 
loolhall coach of Notre Dame, was referee of both games. 

Rice was represented in the Drake Relays on April 27 by 
their dashman. Claude Bracev. The scheduled meet with 
Texas University was moved up to Wednesday in order that 
enlranis honi the Texas team miglit also get awav in time to 
make tlie journey. The relay games were held in rain and mud, 
hut Bracev was able to run tlie 100 \ ard dash in O.H seconds 
defeating Elder of Notre Dame, rolan of Michigan, and Simp- 
son of ( )hio. At the close of the season and after being defeated 
for his first time in conference competition by Leiand of Texas 
(Christian Lniversity, Bracey entered the National Intercol- 
legiate Track and field Meet at (Jiicago. where he last year 
dislinguished himself as the fastest dashman in collegiate com- 
|ictilion li\ winning the 100 and 220 \ ard dashes. This year he 
uas able to gain only second place in the 100 and third in the 
220. running close to Simpson whom he had beaten several 
limes during the season. Simpson, however, ran an unusually 
fast race and set a new time for the distance — 9 2 5 seconds. 
The luo places gaM' Rice a team score of 14 points and placed 
ihcm elc\enth in the meet. Bracev continued to carry the 
name at Rice Institute into the limelight by entering some 
exhibition races in the East. At Washington on June the 1.5 he 
led the field to the tape and in New York two days later he did 
il a";ain. winning over Tolan and NX'ilderninth. riinning both 




races in 9.8 seconds. The American Xnialeur iiici-t. ii|ifn In all 
amateurs collegiate or otherwise, was held in Denser .lul\ llh. 
and Bracev closed the season with a sec()n<l in llie 100 and a 
third in the 220. This time he was Ijeaten by Tolan and W vkofl'. 
number one dash men on tiie 1428 Olympic Team. Bracev is 
captain-elect of the 1930 Running Ow Is. 

Wiien Emmett Brimson came to Rice he had had s(ime ex- 
perience as a runner at the Houston Central High Sciiool. and 
under Coach lljertberg he soon developed into a strong cnii- 
tender for all races of middle distance. After a nnndier of mIus 
in dual competition, he took first jjlace in the Cross-coimtry 
championships, leading Rice to her first championship in this 
sport after a participation of only three vears. The next fall 
the Cross-countrv team tied lor first place with \. X M. undi'r 
his captaincy. In the track season of 1928 his performance was 
little short of astcjunding. Sacrificing the possibility oi estab- 
lishing a new record in the mile run in order that lie might have 
strength to place in the two mile, he satisfied himself uith a 
first place that ecpialled the existing record. In the half mile 
he set a new conference record, and then went into the two- 
mile and finished third to two of his team-mates, thus winning 
high-point honors of the meet. Sliortly afterwards, in the 
national meet, he placed fifth among the runners of the coun- 
try. He has left in his name and in the name of his school a 
record of victories that mark him as one of the onlstamling 
runners of the .Southwest. 



T H E P I C r I H E S 

Left: Coach H,jeill)e[fi niv ni^ 
Bracey points on slarlin^. \ 
recollection oC his uwii (l;iy ;is ;i 
Irack star. Coacfi r;iri si ill iim 
;i Ciisl (|iiMiler. 



I'.i i,(.\\ : Wl.iiiro \,MillM.^;:\|. 
Ifii imllin^ Lhr sIh.iL 



I 






■M ■,.. -rV 





B A S E B A I. I. 




iia m J PB J 



BASEBALL. Sl'BIXU l»aO 

Last year I was new to the bovs on 
till' lpasc-li;ill lc;iin and was iniac- 
quaiiitcd \»illi llic Ironhles thai had 
to lie ironed out in tlie season. W itii 
tlie small time that was left before the 
season started, a fair college team was 
built around a feu veterans. 

T found the li(i\ s to he hustlers and 
over-an\ion> to win. \^ ith the young- 
sters on tlie t<am knowing me better 
this year, this over-anxiousness can 
be ironi'd out and a real champion- 
sliip coiiteuder will soon follow. The 
team of this year will be largely made 
up of members of last vear"s freshman 
team, hut in lliat. there will be 
enough hall pla\ers to smooth out tlie 
troidiles that came from some of the 
memhers (d last \ ear's team being 
forced to pla\ out of their regular 
positions. 

CdSC.lI CKNE BAILEY 





The I'lrhl 

When warm weather comes, this year's pitchers 
are going to pitcii good ball with good support 
afield. — Coach Gpnc Bailey 

The Rice Baseball team last year did not do so 
well, due to the fact that several players were 
playing out of position because of a lack of ma- 
terial. 

This year, however, there seems to be a plenti- 
hd Mipply of material, and the team as a whole 
should In- improved, riie pilcliing staff, composed 
of Captain Cecil Keith, i'aiii .Smith. Bucholz. and 
May Hart promises to he one of the best to ever 
rejiresent a Rice team. 

I siiicereU hope the hovs the liesi ol luck, and 

wish I could lie out there pla\ing myself, hut since 

I cant play. 1 will be on the sideliiii's pulling hard. 

— CiijiUiui Ihiniiy Allniirli 

It was Coach Haile\ "> gri'at work in coaching 
with the best leadership of the team liv Captain 



^ ■< T 



^^ 




TllK Squad — Front: Ausliii. Sinilli. Ciiiilain Mlnoili. r.i.acli 
Baiioy, keith, Carroll, Sloppcl. 

Back: Geyer, Abies, Knippel, \]i)tit;it_iiiHTy, Dickiiisuii, Mor- 
gaa. 

AlliKicli lliat carricil tli<- ()\\ls in llio wimiin;^ ol 
many l)all ganios. 

I hope that 1 will he ahle to lead the team this 
year in the eapahle manner in wliieh it was leil 
last year by Danny. — ('iiphiiii-clecl Cecil Kcilli. 



The past season was not so successliil from a 
standpoint of games won. hut for effort ]»iil out. 
the team was as hard to heat as a major league 
team. 

Injuries played a large part in contributing to 
the cause of the lost column, but other teammates 
tried hard to mend uj) the gaps caused bv the had 
luck. Still, it took a good lillle time to get ever\ - 
thing in harmony after the mishaps. 

The weaknesses of last year's line-up will he 
mended by the coming of several stars from the 
freshman squad, and the outlook for a winning 
and a hustling team is yery bright. The few 



\eti-rans uili lend nuuli aid in sIcacK- 
ing ihe cluli in tense mojiiciils. and 
llirre should lie lacking that unsleadi- 
iio^ ill the ])inches which cost the 
()ul> of H»i!Q so many hall games. 
Some of tlie >oplioiiiore greenies will 
haye lo gain confidence in their plav. 
before they can liccome real stars, hut 
aiiiiil old-liincrs this >h(iMld iiol he 
JKird. The Owls of 1930 should be a 
fasi and hard hustling learn tiial will 
heal out main infield ta|)s and sli^ai 
iiKiiiN liases. The yeteran liasc steal- 
ers should be the tiicfl men of ihe 
conf<'rencc. 

(loach Bailey proy cil ihal he was 
a wi>nderful coach h\ taking men that 
|)layed ball like a bunch of saiid-lot- 
lers and turning them into rangy hit- 
lers and fast fielders. So satisfactory 
was his work that he was asked to 
take over a greater chdi. the Houston 
Buffs. 

(:\i'T\i\ ll\^\^ mj.mkii 




in I: I' I C II RES 

Hliiu'l : Thr rniiiims iKillcry. 
h.iiiriN Mhi.M li;ill.l(:rril krilh 



I'.Kl.iiu; r.iiphiiii l);inii> \l 
■h.Cill.hiiTl-rl.Tl I'r. il Ki'ill 




PSHH'-KT^^aSr^flV^' -iWi 





iiK:*<r.>ii<: of the skami.v 



liiu a I ni\ iTsit\ 


(i 


Ki.e 


(1 


\ cV \1 


i} 


Kiee 


2 


l(iu ;i I iii\ civilN 


1 


Kire 


- 


\ ^ \1 


1 1 


Kie.- 


t) 


Norlliwc^lciri 1 . 


o 


Kiec 




\ ,V \l 


1 


Kiee 


o 


Norlhui-sliTii I . 


•1 


Riee 




\ .K M 


10 


Kiee 


1 


Texas L ni\ cisilN 


.> 


Kiee 




SML 


.^ 


Riee 


- 


IVxas I iiivi'rsit\ 


1 


Rice 




SML 


. 8 


Kiee 


N 


Texas L ni\(-isil\ 


II 


Rie.- 


10 


S\IU 


.S 


Riee 


10 


Texas L iii\ cisiu 


1.; 


Kiev 




SMI 


o 


Kiee. 


6 


l?a\ l<ir I iii\ cisilv 


1 


Kiee 




TCU.. 


1 1 


Kiee 


12 


l<a\ lor I iii\ ci^ilx 


1 


Riee 




TCI 


.1 


Kiee 


H 


I5a\ Inr I ni\ cisil \ 


- 


Riee 




TCL 


i: 


Ki.i- 


1 1 


Bavliir I ni\ ci-iu 


« 


Rice 




TCL 


II 


Kie.- 


10 



lidlliim iiiul lii'hliii^ 



I'layr 
\i.les 

MIlKM'h 

\Mslin 

Reissiier 

Carroll 

I )iekiri>oii 

MoillgoiiierN 

Slo]i|>el 



//} 


H 


// 


2/- 


HI, 


//, 


32 




H 


1 


1 




7(1 


- 


o-i 


4 







00 


-1 1 


20 


1 





1 


10 




1 








(lO 


II 


1:5 


3 






01 


■1 I 


2.') 


1 


3 


1 


m 


1) 


10 


1 


1 




:\\ 


12 


1.') 


3 


1 





SI, 



n t / 1 

230 13 
280 0(i() 
302 a 12 

, 0(>2 <3:>7 

. 180 «72 

271 001) 

231 031 
.101 .000 



Ji~i uii 'jm -^9 



fi ' 8.-: 







I'iltllillfi A'rCK/i/.s 

I'iiriivr <: II' i< n nil so ii i. kih, rc/i 

Keith l:l ;-!l '^'^ !'.2 17 :>l 1 U \ 2 100 

Miles 11 ii2 (,\ ')2 VA ■l:\ 2 Old 2')0 

Smilh 8 33 Mi .1') J2 lil 2 2 \ :> . :>00 

Till-: I4»\V.\ I .MVI-:il>ilTV ^tKltll*^ 

Tlio season was Iciniiallx ii|ieiieil with llie l{iee lossers spill- 
ing a series of luo ;:ann-s willi loua I niversilN. Ki<c (lrii|i|ie(l 
(lie first (i-O. and won the seeond 1-7. Iowa hustled its ua\ 
tlirougli the first jianie hehind the e\eellent |)it(liini; oi \li-. 
Twogood. In lh(> seeon<l ;;anie it «as the huslliiiii ( >u Is that 
eanic throngh with the determination to «in. Keith was gi\en 
almost perleet support on the field. Alluocli s hilling was sen- 
sational. 

TilK X4»ilTIIM >:**TKII> I .MVKKSITV <>«■•: II IKS 

In llie seeond exihition series of the season the Kiee hasidiall 
nine split a two-game engagement with Northwestern I ni\er- 
sily. The scores were 2-3 and 5-0. Danny's hitting again fea- 
tured the first game, his timely hingle heing the one lo lireak 
it up. The second game was a dark fra\ for llie ()uls. as \ll- 
noch and Beissner wimm' hurt in a eollision while alleinpling to 
eateh a foul hack of third hase. Me\lee pitehed uiihealahle 
hall for the \ isilors. u Idle .liiruu\ ( :arroll led the allaek lor the 



I II I. /'/(. 7 ( RK S 

Ll,l r: l'"r;illk Vll^till roMclirs il 
Hi.-,. |,„>,.-IH,|„.T salrU I,, 

lliiril l>;isr. IhiI llir iiKir;;iii is 
|„vll> rlns... 



r.l.K.U: I'llil Milr.s. |-,;,Mk 
\uxlii. 



fe'^fe**^' ^ 










t/ ^ 




r II /; /' / c r i h i: s 

HiGin: .liiniiiii' t'.inroll iti iIm- 
M(.t ul siiiiishitiy oiil ;i liil 
atranisl Hn yi(H". 



Hl.lMU : llr,i,A l-M-issiir,. ,li,n- 

inir r,;,.n.l| 




t 




^% 






3 




M\s l>. "Tuasin this j^aiiii' (luit Paul Sinilli [jii)\f<l hiiiiscll to Ijc 
a n'lii'l |iit(lii'r' ot iiniisiial iiu'ril. 

TiiK Tii:x.\s A.kVM. si-:riks 

Kicf lost I lie lii-.-t luo ;.'aiiH-s of tile \iS M series. 'I'lie Owls 
were j;iiilt\ iil six errois in tlie first game, and this was largelx 
I he cause of Miles" (low rilall. 1 1 is periorriiaiiee \\ as hv no iiicaiis 
a had one. though the score uas 8-2. The Aggies whi|j|ieil lh<' 
()wls in the second encounter liv a score of 14^-'^. A seven run 
lead uas loo great for the ( )\vls to overcome. Keith was wild 
anil Paul Smith finished tiie game in great style. Aided bv poor 
lidding on the part of the Aggies, the Owls tried hard to rally, 
and did. hut it fell short. The last two games of the series were 
>|)lil. I he ( )w Is u inning 2-1 and losing I -lO. Keith won a pi tell- 
ing duel from Mills of the \ggies. in which he had great sup- 
port. (Carroll starred afield and at hat. The Aggies came liack 
strong in the last gaiue of the series and gave Wendt plentx of 
sujpport in fielding and hatting, featuring Conover with four 
hits out of five trips to hat. For the Owls. Danny Allnoch was 
the hitting star, his trijde saving the (^wls from a shut-out. 
l)iekin>on proved again that In- ua> the he>t IK chaser in the 
conference li\ taking in a long drive that uas lahcled lor extra 
liases. 

Till': K.wi.oit •>>i-:iiiii:*» 

It ua> Keith s great hurling and Knippcl s and Dickinsons 
:;nat hitting that paved the uav lor the (i-l victorv of the 



<«i ftiu '^ 




Owls in llie first game of the Bavlor series. Dickinson proved 
to he a Tris S])eaker at snagging flies. Ahles |)iteiieil a creihtahle 
game at the second meeting of tiie chdis hnt had tlie iiard luck 
of lieing heaten \t\ a homer in the ninth hv Gilliland. which 
ended the contest 4-2 in favor of the Bears. For tiie ()«ls. 
Dickin.son was again the fielfhng star, witli si\ har<l chan<es 
without a liohble. 

In the third contest. Fuzz Douglas hianked ihi' ()wls with 
a no hit. no run "ame of seven innings, the (rame heini; called 
at the end of the first of the eighth, after the Owls had scored 
four runs in a rain. Because of the rain the game was called, 
reverted to seven innings, and given to the Bears; a 7-0 victorv. 
The Bears had to win the fourth game to remain in the run- 
ning for the conference title, and the\ <lid hv a score of 8-1. It 
was Morgan's homer that saved the ( )w Is from another shnl- 
out. 

the: TEXAS SERIES 

The first game was a pitching duel between Keith and 
Railton. the latter gaining a .5-3 verdict, due to errors on the 
part of the ()uls. All of the Longhorii's runs were un-earned. 
Bad support also cost the Owls another game when the teams 
uiet in the second game of the series. Ahles [(itched great hall 
and deserved to win. hut his support was terrible, and this 
made him unsteadv. Dickinson led the hitting attack of the 
Owls. Texas" errors allowed Rice to score two runs, but heads 
up base running by Austin accounted for the third tallv. Dan- 



/ // /<: I'lC TL RES 

Ll-:i' t: Dickinsim cMtiiiii;: lioiiic 
IVir a l:iM> : K,ii|i|>rl Triiikinj; a 
[iiil-oiil oil lir.sl. 



i'.i io» P„,l, hi. kins,, II. .1,, 
K I"-I 




/ // /•: I'lC TIRES 

Un;iii: Mdiil^omery ln'als il 

iiUrr hil liiiK one. 



I'.ill \l.„;.,ill 






f ? 



ii\ hu^llcd rMi;;lil\ luinl. Ii> \u>r the j;aiin'. \{ llic third nii't'ling 
(il tin- <luli>. Pcxas afjaiii mommI oiiI llir ( )« Is. |pv a hitting spree 
ol four runs in llif iiinlii alter the ( )h Is had scored ti\e riuis in 
their half of tlie inning. The ()hIs |)la\ed ragged hall afield, 
heing credited with li\i' errors. Morgan was the hitting star of 
the game. In the last cricoMutcr. the Texas team pounded out 
I! hits to defeat the ( )u Is |:U2. KeithV wildness was costly. 



THK T.l. I . SKIIIE.S 

It was knippels homer in the ninth that brought the win- 
ning tally in the first game of the r.(".l'. series and enabled 
the ()wls to gain a lil-1 I \i(tor\ o\er the Horned Frogs. Paul 
Smith tlid some nice relief pitching in this game. Too much 
Buster Walker caused the Owls to lose the second contest 5-3. 
Hill Morgan started a nintli inning rally, hut it unfortiuiatelv 
fell short. This was the hest de((nsi\e game that the Oyvis had 
put up all season. Montgomery was the shining light in the 
fielil. The Toads tallied in the ele\enlh to win the next en- 
counter h\ a score ol I 1-10. I he inahilitN of the ( )w I hurlers to 
lind the plate was res]>onsil)li' for the loss. W allin was the big 
gun for T.f'.l . in this game, starring both in the fiebl and at 
liat. Krank Vustin uas hustling best for the Oyvls. At the last 
meeting ol the two clubs, the ()u Is and the Horned Frogs vni- 
ilouliledly broke the scoring records ol the (lonlerence for one 
game. They put on a scoring marathon for the spectators that 



♦^ . 



II 




ended IT-1 I in lii\iir ol llif Froi;s. Tliat s 31 runs in an after- 
noon! Neither team had pitchers availahle that could stop the 
scoring. The Owls booted the hall all over the field and com- 
mitted eight costly errors. Kni])p('l was the hitting star of the 
game, getting a homer, a douhlc. and Iho singles unl ol four 
tri|ps t<i the jdate. 

THE K.M.I'. SEICIKS 

The S.M.U. series was a bright spot in what might other- 
wise have been a dark and gloomy season. Four times the Owls 
were able lo turn back the Mustangs. The first victory was bv 
a score of 7-S. Cecil Keilh pitched some excellent ball in the 
pinches. The Owls won the second game of the series 1 l-K. 
Joe Stojipel and (Jeorge Montgomery had gone on a hitting 
spree in llie first eiieounlcr. and llie\ kept it up thru the second. 
Keith «iin his fourth hill victory when the Owls emerged al 
the long cud of a 10-5 score in the third encoimter. An eighth 
inning ralK in the fourth game netted the Owls four runs and 
brought a (i-2 trimn])li and a clean sweep of the S.M.U. series. 
This game marki'd Rices se\enlh Conferenci> victor\ out of 
sixteen starts during the course of the season. A fast double 
play was the feature stunt of the Owl work afield. Joe Stojipel 
and ,Joe Knippel were the leaders in the Rice hitting attack. 
Phil Abies" work was noble. lie pitched tight in the pinches. 
and he even contributed to the scoring with a single. His ef- 
forts were rewarded, for "Didl\ '" quite evidently got rid of thi' 
pesky Jinx that had been dogging his heels, or perhaps sitting 
on his arm. all season. 



////-: /' / C 7 I R E .S 

Left: Sniilli (onii's honic (in 
T.C t\; Sl.MM"! liil-''^ •■' "il 'il 
III,' .iasis.-^ippl.-. 



I'.M .!« I'illll Siiiilh. Jc.c Sli 




''4 ' . '^ X 



p. - !*■ 




_ J I- 




OTHER MAJOR NPORTS 




THE l> I CT I R F S 

Rn;:n-l : 'I'lic s(1ii;m1: <'o:uIi 

BecheiilKi.li. Caiiliiiri \|,|ifll, 

Si-hwarz. Lc>f;;ili. Ili-ss, Pruilc, 
niiirk 



HRl.Ort-r.oaihlJI ['..■(■|i.Til,;,.h. 

Ciiplilill \li>llis \|l|llll ill III- 

[ioii. 





The Rice leniiit* leaiii liad the most siiiccsslul season of its 
liistor\ iliiriii}; l')2'). ih-spile tlie fad that (laplain Morris Ap- 
|)ell uas llie onl\ M'leran availalde (or llie leaiii. V|)|iell eniled 
his Rice career uilh the |)heiioiiienal score of sixteen victories 
and htit two (h^feals for the dual meet season. I less, playing in 
first place on account of Appell s imcerlain health, won thir- 
Iceii III his eii;lilccn matches against ihe stillest opposition. 
Schwarz. Logan, and RIack all gave a good aeconnl of them- 
selves ihrouglioul llie season, winning most of their matches, 
and each lurning in heroic victories when \iclories were most 
needed. 

Rice finished a series of pre-season. non-conference meets 
willi four \ iciories and no defeats. After havinjr lost six straight 
meets to ( )klahoma. Rice came hack strong this season to 
trounce the Sooners in ihe fall and again in the s|)ring. Led hy 
their great captain, Harris Coggeshall, (Jrinnell (College of 
Iowa gave Rice a great battle before the ( )wls finally emerged 
victorious. Black probably played the best tcmiis ol his life in 
uiiming the deciding match for Rice. Drake's t«<>-inan team 
came dou n Irom l)es Moines to sliov\ our third and fourth men 
hou it slioidd be done: they learned more, however, when thev 
met \pp(ll and Mess tiian thev had laiiglit in the preceding 
matches. Rice Hon the meet. 



I 



^ r- 




I II K PICTURES 

I.Kl ]: \pi.fll htkI II.ss. IIh- ill- 
\ iiicihic doubles [niir. Hess has 
jusl hil one — Appcll is WEiil- 



TiiK ii.wijtit .>ii-:kt 

The aiKrnt of tlii' ((inicrcnce season lomid the Hiii- Icniiis 
team in the prime of eonihtiori. |{a\ lor was imahle lo take a 
match in lier meet with Kiee on tlie IJaylor eomts. Hess liirneil 
in a notalile vielor\ o\er I'owers. Baylor's star |ila\er. 

Tlll<: S..M. I . MKKT 

\[o\ini£ on to S. M. L .. the Kii-e |)la\ers eontiniieil their 
winnini; «avs. takinj; five inatehes lielore ilarkness slopped the 
meet in the miildle ol the last match. It the Dallas papers are 
to be believed, only darkness saved S. M. U. from a ()-() defeat. 
Hess and Sehwarz featured in this meet, if individual stars can 
be named for a meet that was all Rice from the start. 

THK T.l .1 . .>IKKT 

Returning to Houston, the Riee team performed its "skunk- 
ing " act for the third time against a eonferenee opponent. 
beating T. C. V. 6-0. and giving the lioiiie-foiks an idea of how 
the same thing had been done on iIk' roa<l. 

THK A. & .>l. .>ll<:i:T 

rile unlathomable lealure (}f the season was the \iitor\ ol 
A. \ M. over Riee. Baylor. .S. M. I .. and T. C. I . iiad all beat- 
en A. i.*t \1. easily, marking that school as an eas^ victory for 
Riee. However, the linal score was \. iK M. I. Rice 2. 



Hi M.U M.MTIX \|,|l(H -Ciip- 

l.iill.Jiikr II. -ss C;!!.!:!;!!.!^.'.-! 




*m M 



T H E r 1 c r I H E s 



Hlliin: S(ll«;iiv, ;iri.l \'.\:„k 
llMIII I.IL'rill.'l ill .lolll.l.'. 



Belciu . .lullIlli.N l.ociUI ill lllc 

conclusion (if a rorcluiiui drive; 
NorniMtl Scliwarz wiiiliiii: foe 

III!' Iiiili III niMlc ilowii III 
Slllll^l1 ,IMT ;i sriAi.c 





TIIK TKXA*» >IKKT 

III \ 1 1- 1 ill. IJicc -ulh'rcil liiT uoist dclrat iil the season. Texas 
u inning (i-O. I'he \{\ir nel-iiieii li)Mi;lil liarcl lint liisl lo a sii- 
|ieii(>r team ol |)la\ers. Texas is to lie eiiiMiiieiicleil for her e\- 
eellent team of 192*^. 

TIIK 4 IIXPHIH-^XH .>IHKT 

The ( lonfereiice Meet was held on the Texas lni\ersitv 
loiMls. Mess « as eliininated in the (iiiarter-finals in a surprise 
\ ielor\ lor Ker^uson ol ^Fexas. XpiK'll and Hess went to the 
senii-linals. where ihev «ere eliminated liv IVrgnson and Dmi- 
la|> in a MKileh marked li\ 1\ pieal Texas L niversity "strategy". 
\|p|)ell was unahl<' to |)la\ in the singles tourtianient. and this 
rosl Kiee the eerlainl\ of a singles semi-finalist at least. So 
ended a highU siieeesstul season in which Kiee won second 
|ilace in ( ^uderenee rating. 

««< IMtK*>i t'OU Till-: l!»2!» Nl<:.\*>><»> 



Kiee I Oklahoma U. 2 

|{iee I (M'innell 3 

Kiee I Drake I . 3 

Uici- I Oklahoma l. 3 



Rice 6 Bay lor I) 

Rice 5 SM.V. 

Rice 6 T.C.U. 

Rice 2 \.^\1. i 



Ric<- Texas (■> 



I'Ik- s(|nad consisled of the following: \|i|m'1I (captain). 
Hess, .'^rliwarz. Lo"an. lilack. I'riKle. The first f'onr lettered. 



'> : F-: 



X ■! ' 



P'p'i 



L"l 




CROS>i tOI>TKY-FALL l»29 

With the loss of Bruiison. ^ ailiroiiiih and HiUianl. the cross- 
country prospects for m2*) were rather cloudv. The squad was 
small, as usual, lonsisting of Captain Willis. Jacobe, Arnold. 
Kaplan. \\ ihnotii. \\ orthani and Bennett. The first meet of the 
year was lost to Texas at Austin. Phe ( )uis uere not heaten ii\ 
the Texas runners, hut \)\ the elements, being forced to run ihe 
race on wet concrete in rubber-soled shoes. The only other (hial 
meet was lost to the destined Conference champions. A<S:\1. 
who were a great team: no outstanding |)eriormers. but very 
well balanced. The Conference Meet was held oyer the Her- 
mann Park, course on November 2S. \ night of rain and <iild 
wind preceded the race day and ulicn the five teams lined up 
for the gun of the starter, one found it ililhcult to remain u arm 
even under heavy elotiiing. The AiS:M team was favored to 
win and did so easily, with Texas placing second, SML third- 
Rice fourth and TCI iiftii. Tlie season of 1020 was the worst 
a Rice cross-country team has experienced in four years and 
Coach Hjertberg expects it never to happen again. But two 
men were lettered this time. Captain \\ illis and Jacobe. Ihi- 
latter finished eighth in the Conference Meet while \\ illis won 
the race by some three liundred yards, bringing his list of vic- 
tories to three in as many starts during the season. Great 
things are expected of botii men liefore tlie\ fniish their tra<k 
careers at Rice. 



THE P I CT V R ES 

l^Kl-r: 'fill' (^russ ( '.(iiiiil ly 
SqiiiKJ; Wilniolli, l\H|iliiri, Wil- 
lis (caiihiint. Coach Hjcrfhcrg. 
Vrriold, .larolw. BcTincll. 



Below: TIi.' L.^I Icrni.ri, Cap- 
tain Jesse Willis, anil liussrl 
Lee- .Tiio.b.-. 








THE FICTLRES 

Right — The Squud: Slur^es. 
And rews. llli^, (ireeTiwood. 
r.olin. Sinitli, 



Below — Captain Joe Grepn- 
wood. Harold Cohn. 





(yolf was a most successful sport in 1Q29. Rice liaii a six man 
leaiii as gooi) as any in llie cuuntrv. anil quite superior to any 
aggregation in the Southwestern Conference. The Owl squad 
was composed of Dan Smith, Joe Greenwood, Carl lUig, Jr., 
Harold Cohn. Forrest Lee x\ndrews, and Don Sturges. Four 
men were used in all of tiic dual meets while all six were avail- 
aiiie for the (jonlerencc tournament. 

\l)out the middle of April Tiie Texas University golfers 
came to Rice and secured an even hreak in the first dual meet 
of the season. Later in the month the Owls journeyed to A.&M. 
and amid thunder and lightning adtninistered a five to one 
heating to the Farmers. Just prior to the Conference tourna- 
ment the Rice golfers made a trip to S.M.L. and again se- 
cured an even hreak. 

The men who participated in these dual meets were selected 
according to their standing in the ladder tournament which 
was in progress throughout the season. Jn tiiis way those who 
were playing the hesl golf were used in the nuilch ]>iay conqie- 
tition. 

Joe (rrecnwood of Houston served as ca[)tain during U)29 
replacing Dan Smith who was captain in 1928. In tlie three 
seasons the Owls have lost hut one dual meet, and this to 
Texas ITniversity in 1928 when that school held the conference 
ciianqiionship. The other meets have heen either iialved or 
uon. In the medal plav championship the Owls in the past 
llin'c seasons have never finished worse than second. 



I . , 




4 O.XFKKKX K ^IKKT lif2U 

Tlie Soiitliwest Conference touinanient is the liig event ol 
the golfing year. The seven conference scliools are allowed six 
men eacii in the qualifying roinid and llie scliool returning tin- 
four low scores wins the Conference cliaiuipionsliiii for the year. 
In l')2') Texas Christian University ami the River Crest (coun- 
try Chdi of Ft. \^ Drth were the hosts for the tournament and 
on May 16th representatives of six schools teed off with a ho|><- 
of returning winners. 

Rice with a total of 320 took home the tropin liy a margin 
of eleven stroke-, (irccuwood. Illi";. Smitii and Colin supplied 
the scores: 

(ireenwood 7'> 

Illig 82 

Cohn 8.? 

Smith li.') 

Total 32*^^ 

In th<' matcli )>ia\ tournament tiiat foilowcd ail six men 
from Rice succeeded in (|ualif\ing. four found tiieir way to tlic 
quarter finals, and two to the semi-liuals. 

Greenwood. Illig. Cohn. and Smith received the Varsity 
"R" for heing members of the chani])ionship conference com- 
bination. At the close of the successful season Forrest Lee An- 
drews of Houston was elected captain for the l')30 year, whiiii 
according to all indications siiouid iiriiig auntiicr victory lor 
the Owls. 



77/ f: I' I CT I RES 

Ijurr — Till' ('.iiiiri'ii-iM (■ I'lci- 
pliy; r.:iiiliiiti ( ircciiwond in 
iirlioTi 



Hki.iiw Cirl llliK. .Ii 
Slllilli. .Ir 







1^ 







FRESHMEN <«iPORTS 
AND INTRAMIJRALS 




f!^ 1 Y ua 




FrKSIIMAN hASKKIBAl.l. St}l \V — li'irk: W.sl. 

Croiroid, Koch, Paton, Srhultz. Fnml: iUxoii, 
Scllors, Conru'll. AlexnnHcr. Quiii. 



PIIKKIIMA.X IIASKKTIIAIJ. 

I'lie Slime l)ask<'ll)all ti-ain under 
(lie (lireetioii of (Joacli "F'eaiiiits" 
Seluiltz rose lo great heiglils in the 
l')29-30 season. The Freshmen swept 
the cage year with a riisli that liallled 
most of tlieir opponents, and as a re- 
snh turned in a number of lopsided 
\iitories. \t the close (d the season 
nine numerals were awarded to the 
following: Alexander, ('onnell. Oof- 
ford. Dixon. Koch. I'alon. (,)uin. Si I- 
lers, and W est. 

FltK««ll.>IAX F04»TII.%LI. 

Nearly seventy Rice slime gridsters 
made football history for the Institute 
in l'^)20. The Green < )w Is formed six 
teams of lighting gridsters. and all 
six aggregations were used at some 
time during the season In (loach 
"Peanuts" Schullz. 



On Octoher fifth the Slimes met the Kilinhurg 
.junior ('ollege eleven and downed them liv a 
score ol 1') to (i. In this \ictorv every young Owlet 
got his haptism of fire and three of Schnltz" teams 
showed very well. 

( )n Noyendier first the Freshman outfit met 
the Shreiner Institute Mountaineers and were 
healeu liv a score of 13 to 7 despite the fact the 
Institute youngsters made twelve first downs to 
six lor the visitors. 

( )n Novendx'r ninth tlie Freshmen were again 
defeateil. this time l)v the Terril Preparatory 
School of Dallas. The Terril boys secured a seven 
point lead in the first half that the young Owls 
coidd not oxcrc-oine. Flie final score was 7 to 6. 

TIk' connniltee on outdoor sports at Rice set a 
record for the Southwi'stern Conference in award- 
ing forl\-fi\<' numerals to the Slime griilsters. 
Those named for the award were: Boliannon. 
Buckingham. Rurke. (iolfce. Coker. Conklin. Con- 
nell. ( !oiniellev. Dal. I)icke\ . Dixon. Doutv. T. D. 
Driscoll. V. Driscoll. Hale. Ilammett, Ilander. 
Harris. Ilassell. Hein. Hill. Janierson, Kellogg. 
Kindiro. Klearncr. \rc\rthnr. Magness. \1artink- 
us. Ma\. Mehr. \lnellir. \lyer. Neveux. Pasche. 
Paton, Quin, Redder, Sellers. Strong, Squires, 
Thrasher. Wallace. West. Younts. McCarthy. 







?S^r2S^i*S-&"^ 



i : ^ 



I 



Fit l<:SIIMA.\ 4 IIOSS 4 4»l XTKV 

I'hf rrcshmen took a lively interest in cross 
country under the tutelage of Coach Hjertberg. 
Two meets were carded with Reagan High School, 
hill the freshmen lost out in hoth. Howard proved 
uniiMial as a ruruK'r. anil Dill gave iiiiirh |iroMii^i'. 

iici<:sii>i.\.v Ti<:.\.M>i i<>:to . 

iiOl.h' *»•£». K.KSKUAIA. i l!»2»i 

The Ireslnnan lemiis sc|nad was composed of 
Barr. (ionnellev. Holden. Carter. Scott, Armi- 
stcad. (iwin. Hudspeth. Doc Barr. ninnber one 
man. is a former state interscholaslic clianip. 
Among other oppinents were the River ()aks 
Country (]lid) and Tcrril Acadeim . In golf. Kiilie 
Albaugh carried the iiaiiie of the freshmen to glory. 
There was never a regidar slime hasehall team, 
due to lack of material, hut a random collection, 
kniiuii as the \Ia\cricks played several games. 

FKEIX>H.>I.\.\ Tlt.\4 K. Iil2» 

The onl\ meet of the year with IVrril school of 
Dallas resulted in victorv for the Freshmen. The 
stars of the meet were Dirk Baldry. '"Piirkev " 
I{eeil. and Ray Harhoiir. Fheron Green. I'Vank 
Hopkins, and Malcolm (!mnmings were the other 
three letter men. 

Harhour bids fair to become one of the greatest 

Tin' Freshnnin ( 'ross ('nnnlrv Sijinni 





FuHsiiMAN Track — Baldhv ano ttABBOUK 

runners of Southwest (Conference his- 
lor\. \\i- was unavailalde for ]').?(). 
hut watch that bo\ rim in UCUI Bal- 
ilr\ is probalilv one of the most versa- 
tile |)erformers in the hislor\ of the 
conference. He does the high jump, 
broad jump, javelin, shot, and discus 
in addition to hi^ favorite event, the 
pole V ault. 

Frank Hojikins showed great prom- 
ise in pole vault and broad jninp. 

Kicc was very well represented at 
the Soiilhcrn A.A.U. meet at New 
( )rleans b\ the two Freshmen Har- 
bour and Halilrv. Halilry garnered 
tvMi first places on the first day of the 
trials, winning first in the junior pole 
vault and jayelin; the next day of 
trials he was first in the senior pole 
vault and second in the javelin. 

Harbour won second in the junior 
half-uiile. and third in the senior. 
These men ably u|)held the fine repu- 
tation that Kice has at the Southern 
A.A.L. 



1 -' 




(■(i\(:il \sii(:ii\l-r 

TIIK Tl .>lltl.l.\4^ TBAM 

The tuinliling team is i'\rr ri';i(l\ hi 
lend a hit of (olor ami fiilcrtaimiicnl 
lo a footliall or liaskclliall f;anii-. riii> 
year tliey overcame iiiarvclinisK llic 
lack of veteran iiieiiiliers. 

IXTHAMI K.\L>» 

Kraiiklin D. Ashcraft was agiaiii the 
leader of an intensive intramural |iro- 
grani. Even tlio plans did not nia- 
lerialize as fully as outlini'd. a fairU 
succ<'ssful season — as successful as in- 
tramural athletics ever are — was en- 
jo\cd. Tlic result does seem a little 
(utile in \ ie\\ of all the preparations 
iria<l<- and ideas lined up. Hut never- 
iheles- it makes it pos^ihle for the 
sludi'uts lo i;el a lot of full and at tin- 
same limi- a f;reat deal of heuelit if 
the\ uill respond to the profiram thai 
rapalde mendx-rs of the Physical l^du- 
cation Department outline each year. 

As usual, intrannual foothall wa> 
postponed until afli-r the Dcccmher 
exams. At last the l<-rrilic. slupcudou- 



acti\il\ got under wax. to he climaxed uilh that 
classic struggle hetween the Town Terrors and th<' 
I )orm Kiff-ralf. The former was under the ahle 
management of Dwight Vustin. and the latter 
Mam Davis. After a hloodv and fearful hattle and 
an e\en more heroic light, the Kiff-ralf emerged 
\ ictorious. 

\ high light in the season was the far-famed 
Kallv Club — Band tussle. With great hueaiidcr\ 
the game finally came to a scoreless deadlock, for 
hoth teams hecame tired from fmnbling. Much 
praise must go to the olliiials for their monumental 
ellorts in keeping this game within a close ap- 
proximation ol the so called game of foothall. 

Then there were the track inlramurals in which 
all students were allowed to compete. Astound- 
ingly, horrihlv, the freshmen were the easy vic- 
tors. Neyertheless a sophomore, Baldrv. was the 
high point man. so the sting was somewhat al- 
layed. Thus it would seem that as a man gains 
in wisdom and knowledge, he decreases in strength 
lor the classes finished in order — freshmen, sopho- 
mores, juniors, and seniors. 

ihe sport that called the greatest mnidxr of 
athletes yvas haskethall with the following teams. 
The I'dreigners. '{'he (;hani|)s. The All-.'^lars, and 
The Karin' Ki\e. W ith such fiery names you could 
well expect a league that was a veritable coidlagra- 

/■/;.■ Tilinliluiii r,;nit 




r ■ 



tioii. liiiK iiiaiu tfirific slriigiilcs took [jiacc. 

Ill cxlra Icatiires the chemical engineers poiireil 
acid all over an asgrejration from tlie Heights and 
the Pre-Laws won their snit against the Rand in a 
contest that fairly hoiled over. 

Along comes a money-making genius and puts 
up a series of Lilliputian golf courses over the city 
and offers a silver loving cup in a contest. I |i 
step two doughty sons of Rice who say that tlic\ 
will do or die. Putting forth all their skill and 
strcngtii ill this great golf coiilcst they cniergeil 
witli shining glor\ . in the form of a hcaiitiful silver 
loving cup for tlie honor of old Alma Mater. These 
heroes were Homer Woodward and Hohhy Imher. 

Finally, the golf bug settled down to choice 
morsels in a gigantic tournamcnl open to all who 
wished to strive and win. Tlii-n- wi-rc no eligihilitv 
rules and tlie field wa.'- o|)i-ii. Those making the 
ten lowest scores were to he considered seriously 
for the varsity golf squad. This was indeed a great 
occasion anil much non-comhatant turf was torn 
up liefori' the tiling was set I led and the golf hug 
was gorged. 

And last hut not least Iciinis hroiight the fem- 
inine cleinciit into the great plan to make the Rice 
student tiic healthiest and most \ igoroiis in aii\ 
uiii\cr>il\ an\ where- no iiicaii uiidcrlaking. 

Sli„ir Fiu.limU Tnini l„ li//..n A. ■//.«, 
/,,,v ll„- 1,1,11 





11,11, il H,illv Chil, hilr„„i,inil h\„.i;i,ill (iani,- 

The sport got uiidci' ua\ uilli the 
help o( ihc i','\r\> Tcmii> < Huh u ho de- 
cided at a tea. to lia\c a lournarnciit 
which should he open to ail — girls. 
Miss (daihs Schill. \ icc-|ircsidciit. 
lormalK announced in iiiccliug. the 
great toiirnainciit and the ceding to 
he posted later. VW- ten ranking play- 
iTs were chosen as the tournainent hi'- 
gan and Miss Schill was nuinhcr one. 
Finally, when the hat tic was over. 
Miss Schill emerged as the crowned 
(piccn of tennis players. ( )n the 
strength of their performance in the 
tournainent Miss Schill. Ihden Staf- 
ford. Margaret Taylor, and Rosita 
('evannes were chosen to represent 
Kicc uoMien at the I'las Day of the 
Sam Houston Tcacllcr^ ( iollcge at 
llimtsville. Thev pla\cd ha>ketliall. 
\ollc\hall. tennis, and other games. 
Miss Schill and Miss On amies won 
lirst and second places respectively 
lo hring greater recognilion lo the 
prouess of Rice Women. 







'I 




R 



K 





aiiil now 



» » » » » » 



( )iit' sluuikl lake i;reat care not to 
grow too wise for so great a pleasure 



as lauehter. 



— Addison. 




'Ih>! Iki!' <|Mo|I| lie. 'ImII |.Li|M I s<'.'. 

llie De\il knows liou lo ro« I 

— Coleridfie 



THE HACK 



« . ,. F U R E n~ O II » ,, ,, „ 

"I'lic lime lias romc." llic Walrus said, 
lo talk of tiianv things . . ." " — But it is 
iimcli more fun to talk, about pcojtie. The dirt 
we know, tin' dirt \vc want to know, and the 
dirt wc just suspect. Yon would have to have 
a dump truck and a gas mask to cart away 
all the tripe that can be dug up around here 
in one short year, so we have tried to do the 
work for von (another reason for the lateness 
of our annual). Every available nuick-hea|) 
has been carefully raked and hand picked. 
( hir efforts are, of course, in vain, because 
another man's per.sonal prejudice is as good 
as our own. But really now, be reasonable. 
Come shed a tear for these departed days. 
Onh . tear shedding is prettv sloppy busi- 
ness; let's laugh instead. l>aiigh hard, laugh 
till it hurls. Laugh like \ on realh meant it. 
We ihouglil il was fiiniiN. and \ou'll lind il 
that way too and futile. \\ e did. 



« « « « 



DEIIK ATIOX 



» » » » 



To all those humble souls who niindcd 
their own business. \\ ho didn''t make fools of 
themselves with their hullabaloo and bally- 
hoo, and kept their names out of the Thresh- 
er, — to those who didn't follow the editor 
around with that luok\ and if their picture 
was taken didn"t ask if it were going in the 
Rack. — to those, in short, who are not men- 
tioned here, this section of the Campanile is 
feelingly dedicated. 

It is not that thev are less vain than the 
rest. Thev have the same craving for fame, 
the same keen thirst for an acknowledgment 
of their superiority, be it in the merest de- 
tail. But thev don't know how to be seen in 
public, or thev haven't the courage to stand 
the gaping stares. So they feign an indiffer- 
ence to the cpiest for approval, or else like 
fools thev aloofly maintain that they (and 
thev alone) have found the "real values of 
life. " And we passed them up in their silence. 

But N ou who are included here, God bless 
you, — vou have been troubled h\ no such 
faint -heartedness. \ou have had the covirage 
to worship in the marketplace vour goddess. 
Vanitv. 




If Vdii uill l)t-i(iMi<' as a lillli- cliilil. 
vou ma V pass these port alsun tarnished. 

But beware! Even this most iii- 
noient eounteiianced of chihlreu in 
time became a \Iav (,)ueen and was 
not immune to the fatal hire of that 
areli-goildess. Vanitv. How much less 
shall vou be able to resist her wiles. 
The Rack has ever been Vanity's 
shrine, and perhaps she has you like- 
wise mnnhered here. If so. our sym- 
pathies: if not. beware! 




r.r:-i()\ i;'rr hh-mit tim- d.mI.x -i-i^Miiii,,,, ...i 



THK 3I.\-TII 14 Kl. K-OI T-A4ri.\I.X A IMI It K «( «< 4» F I » :t O 

Ladies and (ieiitleim-ii: 

As 1 liavi" said IJKFOKK. al two seasons oC the ACAUKMIC year. I am 

OPTIMISTIC, at the BEGINNING. an,l al the END. At the BEGINNING 

I HOPE, at the END. I am RESIGNED. On eitlier OCCASION. I am 

GLAD to see yon. I FIND either- COMING, on ihe one hand, or GOINAi. 

on the other. 

Perhaps there is LITTLE to sa\ to YOU that has not ALKEXDV 

been said. I5nl I feel that 1 shonld not let PASS this last OP- 
PORTUNITY to tell yon SOMETHING abont PLATO. ARISTOTLE. TIIUCI- 

DIDES. XENOPHON, SOCRATES. PYTHAGORAS. HOMER. IIOKVCE, ANAXI- 
MANDER. DANTE. EURIPIDES. AESCHYLUS. SOPHOCLES. ARISTOPHANES. 
MILTON. SlIVKESPEARE. MACAULAY. CARLISLE. MOMMSEN. IIARWCK. 
the present lilSllOP OK LONDON, and the late IHSIlOP OK OXFORD (STl BBS). 

To fnrther illnslrale my POINT 1 will say Til VV the laic Lord— J'SV'i - 

VUS a most erudite MAN. onee told the FOLLOWING story. "I was 

ONCE with two eminent M EN. and at another Fl M E 1 was with some 

EVEN greater MEN. Yon might not believe IT. hnl I VV AS. 

The learning we HAVE NOW. is as niueh a M \'l FEK (d n rords as of new 

TH01(;HT OF WHICH more ANON. But. as 1 said to yon 

BEFORE, you owe it to YOURSELVES ami to OTHERS, to write a 

HAND legible to YOURSELVES, and to OTHERS, without EFFORT. \„u 

ought to keep a DIARY. I <iuoli- to YOU froin a diary of LORD Carlisle. 

November 2'). 1852. "Breakfasted with Lord MACAULAY^ EGGS TOAST 

MARMALADE COFFEE." 

But to return to tiie PRESENT «iiirii I do RELUCTANTLY so glamor- 
ous is th. PAST. I am well AWAKE, in the SITUATION in wliieh von 

NOW find vour SELVES, that von are MORE interested in iIk 

PRESENT than in the PAST, so I will r.-mind \()l that tins YEAR 

is the twenty-two hundred and sixteenth anni NERSAK^ of the death of ARIS- 
TOTLE, of^ WHOM Dante fittingly SAID. "11 maestro di eolor CHE san- 

no," or "The master of those WHO know." Soerates taught PL \TO. Plato 

taught ARISTOTLE, and Aristotle taught ALEXANDER the (;r.-at: the first 

THREE were college PRESIDENTS, you all KNOW Alexaml.r. 

And now a PARTING word, before you LEAVE tiiis aeademit 

SECLUSION to enter that MUCH less secluded PEE-rade of LIFE. 

I hope you will SOON be able to MARCH as WELL as toot your 

HORN^ — and to do BOTH at the same TIME. II ML. HAIL FOREVER. FOR- 
EVER HML. HAIL ami FXREWELL. 




n 




The Ri^ht Honorable Frank Ack- 
len Pattie, Pli. D., "The Immacu- 
lale Professor." is witliout an equal 
for color on tlie Campus. His odd 
sense of humor, whicli causes him 
lo hiugh lo iiimself when there is 
nolhiuff funny, has caused some to 
say he is crazy, but tliis is not true. 
If you don't beheve it, get him to 
tell you his pet story about llie 
wife of the paralyzed man wlio 
pulle(i a fast one on her iuisband 
and rn ;i d r him li a I c h e g g s . 



While the cat's away, the mice 
will play . . . but when Papa goes 
after the .cats, the mice are not all 
that do the playing. As the picture 
shows, Wright and the tiger are on 
very intimate terms. The fact is, 
they are in cahoots. Wilbur has a 
way with tigers; to his friends, he 
is "Tiger" Wright, But be careful, 
"Tiger!" Papa is getting lots of 
practice with his gun, and he isn't 
scared of Tigers. W^e hope that 
the iiunliug season is closed. 



John Schuhmacher, the boy with 
the boats (he's treasurer of the 
senior class), is the ablest seaman 
of the Institute. Our John has 
winning ways with the women. 
Some even say with a sigh that he 
should have been King of the May. 
And what does he talk about that 
so takes their hearts!* Wliy, a bar 
of soap that an A&P clerk sold fifty 
times! Haven't you heard it? Well, 
he'll gladly tell you too, and also 
why it never happens at an IGA. 




We are taking this opjiort unity 
to introduce \V eldon Baker to 
that half the Institute which 
couldn't get into the Ch.L.H. for 
his hypnotism demonstration. His 
monotonous voice soon put his 
subjects to sleep. In fact, he was 
so good that a number of his spec- 
tators went to sleep also. He would 
make an excellent Psycho prof. 
Kver since, the co-eds have flocked 
around to be hypnotized. That's 
Baker's technique with the women. 



"Strangier" Lewis is the youth- 
ful aviatrix who bid for fame and 
got it. But the accompanying illus- 
tration would indicate that she 
got it in the neck! This is the way 
our flying ace looked after she had 
been trumped by the glider and re- 
paired by the doctor. They say she 
isn't playing that suit any longer. 
Well, she has established herself 
and needs no re-entry. By the 
same token, she is the vice-presi- 
dent of the sophomore class. 





wm 1 


Ik^ % 


(W^ mmnaf' 




«frfgX 


J? 



Freddie Hoyse, the boy with the 
niillioii dollar smile, is the presi- 
dent of the senior class. But lie 
didn't get there in a day. By dili- 
gent research in the past three 
Campaniles, we were able to find 
a picture illustrating each year of 
this phenomenal rise. The picture 
reads from left to right: freshman, 
sophomore, junior, senior. You 
have the evolution of the senior 
prexy before you. It should be as in- 
spiring as the American Magazine. 



It is said lh;it two young men one 
morniny^ t:ol inln a rather healed 
argument as In which was ihe true 
Autocrat at llic lireakfast Table. 
The spe.tators were shocked. fur- 
Ed Becherdiach and (ieorge Mont- 
gomery are fellows in physics and 
famed for their decorum. The 
Dean was likewise astounded. He 
is rumored to have ■^aid, "1 jusi 
<"an't inuiginc <nii' rii;in r;illiiig 
another a . . of ^ ;ii ihe 

hi'i'akfasl lal.lr'" I I is v.-ry slrang.v 



"Box Car Bush" Joiu-s i^ ;iiiulli- 
er argument against llir niox ic 
tradition that football hrroes are 
goofi looking. To make il more 
conclusive. Bush stooped down at 
the rear extremity of a nuili\ \ 
college education doesn't seem to 
have done him much gt)od- His 
physiognomy has bei-n somewhat 
marred, but at that, he didn't Inok 
tough enough to blulf llie co() that 
arrested him for [jarkirig without 
lights in \\cst Iniversity Place. 



Once upon a time there was a girl 
who was very wise and very beau 1 1- 
ful. She had many admirers, but 
there was one she preferred above 
all others. Now, for all her w'sdom 
(and some even whispered she was 
sophisticated) she hadn't learned 
to w'pe the lipstick off faces. And 
one day she and this chosen one 
returned home very decorated. 
The next day she went to Dallas, 
and soon she went t(.i Europe 
Ah, what a hero is Maddm' 



ki<l Mlnd.iir-. riic lr.Mlor|;isl. 
whose yuuthful n.'\uluLions the 
freshmen liavc patiently watchetl 
year after year with a kindly pa- 
ternal interi'sl . When he takes 
great pleasure in suggesting to 
their supposed horror that In* 
miglit be an atheist, they smile 
and say. "Will that boy never 
grow up!''" Somi' faculty members 
are not so gentle. They say lie's not 
a scientist hut mu inverted iheoio- 
i:ian. and thai iiuikes him furious 





-1 '1 




w niioi I' ( ii\i\ii;\ I 



U.\l TAKAI KEATK ^i E K M OX 

May all men profit 1p\ (liis wondrous lesson, as 
reveaiefl in holy writ. 

(Chapter I. 

There was a man in tlie land oi Hiee « hose iiami- 
was Boh. and that man was |)erfeet ami upright, 
and one tliat feared Papa and esehewed liipior in 
all its forms. 

Now it came to pass that the Lord s i;(iod ,-er- 
vanl Ihili lo(ik<d forward with great rejoieing to 
the time of his departure from the land of Rice al 
the end of four unlitpiored years. 

For a wondrous yisitalion was to come upon 
him in the form of a hrand new aulomohile as a 
reward from on High lor iIk- preserying himsidf 
nnli(pi(>red through tiie torturous four years in 
the land of Riee. 

Rejoiee greatly. () son of San Antonio: shoul 
O student of Riee. for thy reward eomeiii unio 
theei the new automohile is all hut lliine. 

Tin girl friends rejoi(<-. thy room-mates grow 
exeeedingh liapp\. Tiie lime of the fultillmenl 
draweth nigh. 

Chapter 2. 

Now there lielh upon llie highroad to Harris- 
burg, close to the land of Riee. a heer-joint where- 
in are wont to gather the lads of Rice. 

t nto this vile den of iniquity goeth Rush, tin- 
son of .Jones. Ross, called Dum-Dum. the son of 
Kennedy. Morgan of Dcnison. and many others. 

And it came to pass that Bob. yielding in slight 
measure to the su|)plications of Satan as manifest 
through his good friend Billy, did accompany his 
good friend Billy to the Ix^er-joint. 

Now at the beer-joint a wondrous \ ision ilid 
descend upon Bob. and she stroked his hair and 
ilid dub him Buddy Rogers. 



\\ hereupon Bob did \ ield even 
more to the temptations of Satan and 
yowi'd lo nMurn anon to ihr beer- 
joint. 

\^ hieli the same he accordingly did. 
yet again with his good friend Billy. 
Selah! 

But woe and alas! The Law is hard. 
The Law hath no respect for moon- 
struck \oung men who fre(pi<'ut beer- 
joints with a desire to be dubbed Bud- 
dy Rogers Ity a wondrous vision. 

And it came to pass that the joint 
was raided. 

Ami liehold! Phe good man Bob 
and his good friend Bill\ did find 
lodgment in the llarrishnrg calaboose 
for all one Satnrda\ night. 

^ ea verily, the Law i> hard. Vnd 
likew ise are the hunks of its calahoose. 
which the same have also liccn the 
hangout for the unclean since earliest 
lime. \<'a. since the beginning (d 
things (crawling things). 

Chapter 3. 

Alas. alas, the righteous pi-rishelh. 
and no man takcth it to heart. 

\las. alas, the good man Bob and 
his good friend Billy had not whereto 
I urn. 

For the good man Bob ilid perceive 
his new automobile to vanish in the 
smoke of parental wrath, if il did 
come lo pass that the doings of the 
night did become as the pro|perl\ of 
the marketplace. 

And the .Inslice of the I'eace said 
fifteen dollars and costs, and he did 
(Cimli lined 7 jxiiios later) 




MEX AXI» MKTUOUS 

( Hcini; soiiK' dI llic more ])iil)lish- 
al)lf (Iclails as iiiicovcred in a irccril 
intimate intorvicu willi tlial famed 
Salurilav iii^lit siren, (^ara (lomKn 
Cleopatra ({alker. ) 

"Seeinini; attention, ot eonrse. is 
tlie prime retpiisite of all suceess. Al- 
low me to urfie ii|i()n all mv aspiriiif; 
sisters the a(l\ isaliilitv of a eloseU 
trimmed chassis. Furl all sails, hide 
\our ij;lasses. and develop a wriggle- 
slink-riggle proeess of locomotion for 
Sall\|i(>rl and general cloister nse. 
holding in reserxe for dances the con- 



tortion an<l haek-ltending principles which Her- 
man will nndonhtedK h<' kind enough to illus- 
trate and practice with vou. 

"IVrhaps I am getting a little ahead of the storv 
li\ mentioning dances. As a beginner. 1 realize 
that it «ill be necessary to have some chump on 
the string to get you to the dances. I found Alfred 
an ideal tvpe in this emergencv. but I warn vou. 
even a Packard oecasionallv gets rough. If diffi- 
cidtv is experienced in making the primarv con- 
nection. I would suggest the old favorite "shuttle 
advance," with perhaps some hair-stroking or 
hutton-twisting variations. Here the remark is de- 
livered lirst. riien turn \()ur back sipiarelv on the 
victim and walk awav. onlv to whirl suddenly, 
advance again, sav something else, and turn again, 
all done in a very merry fashion. After \ on have 
done this several times, the man will regard vou 
«ith a curious expression, which generalU means 
that \ on have gained his attention. Now hang 
your head, wriggle a bit in the vicinity of the hips 
and dirtidently. slowly initiate an advance upon 
the suhiect. Upon drawing near raise the eyes 
sIowK and with a rush of overpowering desire, 
swoop down on the poor tool and stroke your 
(Cimlirxiit'il 3 [xifii's later) 




Miss l'.:ilkcT iiiTsonally illiisl i iil iiii; llic use of tlial vital 
piiiK i|ilc, llii- [ncssuri' <;oniiii)silL' fA S.A. 



i 



l'!''l'F 



THK ><A4 IIKII 4 Al *»!<: OF IIIIAMA. Olt 
THE >IAIITVItl»0.>l 4»F SMITH 

All lldiisliiii «as in a turmoil — iii)t even a stock 
company was in sight. The spiritual growth of lln' 
citv was threatened. From every side came llit- 
wail of the culture worshiping public. "Oh. gi\i' 
us drama!" Will no one heed this pitiful appeal.'' 
Ah! at last an answer comes, and from that \cncr-- 
able seat of learning. Rice. In a fit of coin|iassi(iri 
on tiicsc poor, suffering souls, our o«n James llar- 
rv Smith swore a niightv oatli of "Once dramatic, 
alwavs dramatic. " and took the sacred vou ol 
]»o\ertv. assininitv and obscurity, ami forlhuilh 
donned his armor. Soon the call to arms rang out 
from every bulletin board. "Rally at the \ulr\ 
House." It seemed as if the whole school had gone 
dramatic. Fidl nuiny score followed tiie ipra\i' 
connnander. Arid throughout the hot fall monllis 
(hey paticiilU (rained for their (irs( gn'at en- 
counter «i(li the forces that war against cultiuc. 

Meanwhile, [he great leader was not neglecting 
his own part, lie knew tiiat am tiling could he 
learned in just liftecn minutes a ila\. ami he ^oon 
mastered the art of waving a eii;are((c holder 





and learned just how (o raix' his lin- 
ger when there was some slight er- 
rand which a chosen mendier of the 
uewK organized J. Ilarr% Smith (llub 
might be permitti'il to do . . . \li. 
what a familiar and favorite iiicnior\ 
is (hat lean figure, all full of piupose. 
striding lirisklv thru (he SalKpurt. 
At last the great momi'iK came. Ml 
Houston was intense. \\\f largest and 
most magnificent hall in the city was 
engaged, the doors were thrown open, 
and the hunger maddened, culture 
crazed throngs poured in; (he house 
was packed, and nianv c\cu risked 
(heir lives by hanging from (lie railing 
{Continued 2 jiiiiifs Ittlfi) 



..<3 



^^.1 



^ IIH ^i ^ 




J 



M K X A > I) >! I<: T II O l» K 

lA'tmliiini'tl > 

dainty hand over his iloiiic. This action uill at 
once gain the attention of hvstandcis ami uili re- 
sult in the hlnshing and iininediate snhjiigalion ol 
your |ire\ . The eflect is even neat<'r than the more 
ordinarv pastime of gentiv hiting the lohc ol the 
left ear while encircled h^ the left arm. 

"Remember, there'll he some foothall tri|» com- 
ing, mavbe to Austin, unii to |iro|»rl\ i-njo\ these 
von nnist keep someone like (Miarles all worked 
up enough to take von along and show \ou a hig 
time for the game ami dinner and the dance. I'Immi 
he (Iocs so pride himself on preserving the forms 
of gentlemanliness. thereip\ assuring his exit in 
time for the entrance of mint laic date who <loes 
lint. 

"Rosv makes another helplul sort ol pla\iiiati'. 
Any difficulties von \\\a\ experience in preserving 
the required nonchalance during mixed hull-ses- 
sions and lack of versatilil\ in related sciences ol 
anatomv. hiological humor, and smokehouse lial- 
lads will he completelv overcome after a single 
date with Rosy. J'hen. too. he is not one id those 
boys that trv to make vou drunk cMr\ liiiic von 
have a date with them he drinks it all liiuisclf. 
the pig. 

"As a final parting word, let rm- warn \ on 
against the sallvport wind, the dangers of strange 
stags who clap in at the L niversitv (Ilid>. and a loo 
astute devotion to good Spanish grades." 

THE «<i.\4 KKU r.\l>>i<: 4»F l»ll.\.>l.\ 

Cunliniifil 

of the third halconv. It was frankK the greatest 
triumph in fiftv years, tho Mr. Snnth was verv 
modest about admitting it. Indeed, modesty is the 
great man's corner stone. And the forces of ig- 
norance and nnrefinement were i-oiupl<'lelv dis- 
persed by these trustv knights of llie saircd order 
of drama. 



I lie storv 1)1 how the grcal director 
led two more charges against tin- 
forces of darkness, and each tinu' 
scattered them diffusely is a thrilling 
drama, hut too well known to be re- 
[leated further here. 

Let us now turn on the sad. sad 
martvrdom of this same James Harr\ 
Smith. Rice must be brought to see 
liiT place as the leader of the new 
dramaticrenaissance. W hen \Ir.Snutli 
had modestly offered to be professor 
(d the new drama, the opportuuilv 
had not been promptly seized upon, 
(he eves of Rice must be opened, 
ami again the leader will be Smith. 
"I will sacrifice all." said the great 
man with a becoming m<)dest\. "II 
Rice will not institute a di'partmenl 
(d drama. 1 will leave her llal. " 

And what will Iticc ilo now.' Will 
she cower before this challenge'.'' Will 
she vield at last before this fur\ '.'' ( >r 
will she remain indifferent to llir 
\(iice of her most distinguished son.' 
W hat? The threat goes unnoticed.'' 
File challenge is ignored':' 

James Harrv Smith is a man ol ile- 
termination. He is a man of his word. 
And now across the front page ol 
everv paper there blazes the startling 
news. A dramatic climax has come to 
the famous exodus of Rice prolessors. 
James Harrv Smith has resignedl 

Surelv, it can't be true! Rut true 
it is. and mourning is draped romid 
every club member's neck. Rice must 
suffer greatly, for great has been hei 
sin. 




I» » E - T It V 

lt\ tlirdiiiililliil Mail! 

Slii'cl laiii|) lii;lil. 
Thru llif hot and 
sliikv May night. 
Ocr llir SoMllierii Heaiitv Frock Sliop. 
Here I lie Kallv Bovs had tlieir spring 

hop; 
And thev laid out on the roofs — 

RalU Chill, 
Little Dave and (iu\ and Mark — 
Going strong lhe\ tried to hark 
At some feline in the alle\ : 
For tonights the night we rally 
Round the Rally. Rally. Rally. 

Rally Cluh. 
The punch how I was a v\itch"s pot. 
The conlciils were some God-knows- 

whal; 
The hand (special hargain) grahlied 

the dough. 
And the iiu'iiiliers still ilon t know 
How eoiiie the delicit — 

Huncha D.ilis! 
At last the red Ford started home. 
But it still had miles to roam: 
Por our wandering Pre-law President 
Had liccoine a reciimhent resident 
III the riiiiihle: 

Rally Ghih. 
"Wake lip. Johiiiul" saiil the driver: 
"Wake up. Johnny !'" said the rider: 
But he slept and kept on slee|iing 
Till the red Ford tired of creeping 
Thru the slillv. chilK ilayvn — 

Wotta Cliil.: 
For the ice house fast and free — 
Twas a nice house to end a s|iree: 
'Cool liiiil off. llie\ liild the ki'i'per. 
But alas! They'd lost the sleeper; 
He yvas tearing doyvn the road — 

Rally Cluh. 



.\ I. I. H .\ I L THE K I X Ci 

T'yvas May Day and the little girls 

Did frolic on the green. 
And little hoys and a liig lilack fool 

Did Homage to the Queen. 

<^)iiecii Homo turned to king-ee bov 

And said, "lloyv ciile you are: 
^ our lialiv lace and curly hair 

Have thrilled me from afar. 

"1 iiey er dreamed of such a king 

With sparkling eves so blue — 
I III really in a lairy land 

\\ hen I am here yvitli von."' 

But King-ee liov did silent sit 

V( hile maidens round him Hocked, 
And (,)iieen lloiiio did jealous groyv. 

Or yvas it she yvas shockedV 

"( )li. King-ee. wont you take my arm 

As we deinonnt our throne? 
My hahv-faced and hlue-eyed boy — 

Oh. yvon't you see me home'.''" 

Hill King-c<- hoy still sat 

And ne'er so much as spoke. 
For he yvas such a handsome bov 

Ami didn't knoys a joke. 

I'Or it yvas Mav day and the folk 

llad come onto the green 
\\ here little girU and little hovs 

Did liomase to the Oueen. 




O I R <» W .X l> K A K C IT .S !< I K K O 1 

Our Gussie is Mie spirit of voutii — with all its 
glamor and romance. If voii (Joii"t believe the lat- 
ter, you can go up lo his room and see for your- 
self. From the looks of the walls, you would think 
he was judging all ihi' hcaut\ contests in (he 
United States. 

The yvhole Inslilule has pulsated with Gussie's 
romances, shared his joys and sorrows, for his is 
the idealistic cycle. Saturday night he meets a 
new girl and decides to make a conquest; Sunday 
he takes her riding; Monday, date; Tuesday, late- 
date: \^ednesday, ])icture; Thursday, engaged; 
Friday, hreak-up: Saturday, despondent and 
drunk, meets new girl and decides to make con- 
quest; Sundax riding; Monday, date; Tuesday, 
late date; etc.. and so it goes. Gus is extremely 
successful when drunk — it lirings out all his lo\ - 
able nature — and as the dance nears its end. liall 
the people there are helping him look for his find 
of tlie eyening. (It does so get your sympatin to 
haye Gus look at \(>u uilli tiiose blurred but im- 
ploring eyes and ask il there arc many people on 
the floor.') 

Gussie has done nuich for his Institute. He ha> 
eyen borne her laurels to the Citllcflc Humor Hall 
of Fame. But this noble service was not without 
its ill eflects. DaiK . e|)isties come telling of aciiing 
hearts in all jiarls of ihc country. 





a harrow in" 



<i.\I.Vi:ST«.X 

"Ah- strange 
arc tiie powers of 
intoxicants." 
says Connoisseur 
Chappie, and he te 
tale. i 

'Twas pitch dark in the long, dark 
corridors of the Beach View Inn at 
luo a.m. "Whoops!" a youthful bas- 
so yoice broke the nigiit's stillness. 
Our hero suddenly found himself 
pcrilousK near the edge ol the Inn s 
ro(d'. and ponilered greatly how he 
got there. Noti<ing his (piite unsteady 
moyements. lie was obsessed uilli a 
fear of falling. Frantic, he dived 
through the first windov\ in his path. 
Strangely, it was the ladies dressing 
room; stranger still, it was emjtty. 
Mas. our adyenlurer had no good 
plan of escape, but began opening 
and closing doors rapidly, iiis heart 
sinking lower as all disclosed only 
dressing rooms. Thougii his search 
made iiim weary, he dared not rest — 
sleep might come, and rcalK. it was 
no place to be caught iiap|ping. 

Meanwhile, his frien<l-. had organ- 
ized a searching |iart\ and had gone 
thru a fruitless search till suddenly 
this same Chappie imrsl oul of a door 
jpcfore tiieni. head dovMi. an<l going 
lull speed. 

The voung man did not meet his 
chemistr\ quiz sections next dav. hut 
alas, they still belieye he was studying 
for an exam. Youth is ea^ilv misled. 
Thi> tale of that night is sometimes 
lolil on raiiiv evening;- in West Hall. 
\nd bits of pink "cor^ctlc. iiiack 



<;eorf;ottp. silk hose, and wliat not — 
all wliicli till' owner vows he docsn"! 
know iiow he a(t|uire(l — are e\hil>il<'il 
as proof of the storv. Some e\iiieal 
ones liave siispeeted thai the young 
man must only he a Real Silk sales- 
man, and not a chemist at all. And 
he doisn I >eeiM to know his nnxinres! 
I{tad ne\l years Hack lor llie se- 
<|iiel:\\ ailing In Braeswood at Mid- 
nighl. 

Il.\rr.\l..\l IIEATE KKII.>IO.X 

wink llial lie shewelh unto the men of 
Kiee iIkiI nolhingniore would lie said. 

And il came lo pass thai nolliing 
more was said, and I he men ol Rice 
did horrow the fifteen dollars from 
llieir respecli\c room-males, and llic 
hrand new anlomoliile lias ali'cadx 
lieen deli\cre(l. 

And somculicrc on llic lace ol the 
earlli. or in llie ualer lienealh llic 
earlli. or in the air aliovc llie earlli. 
there dwells a leniale uilli sense o( 
Imiiior enough lo make lioli Dickin- 
son Ihink lie lo,,k>likc I!n,I,K Ro.'.-rs. 



i'iTi<: 

\flcr li\e 
\ e a r s the 
M a \ I' i t <• 
came lia<k 
lo Rice in 
higliU san- 
g u i n a r \ 
lorni. from 
I h e in o- 
pi; e n I Her 
lli.'liness. 





<,)neen Wilheinlina o( the house of Rhino slalke<l 
daintily through the gasping multitude and appro- 
ached the royal dais, until the rear guard (both 
Hanks exposed) of the procession staggered through 

to the kingU presence, a g I lime was had hv all. 

riiough carefulK planned, the great file was 
charmiugN informal, color being added b\ the 
giacclnl swinging of King Taubenliaus's three 
gilt balls, and giving the king the boid. All par- 
ticipants were selected with careful consideration 
of skin, color (not race), lextnre of hair, width, 
condition, presence or absence ol teeth, and as Dr. 
McKillop remarked to the head janitor, the sight 
would ha\i' given Bcrnarr MacKadden d. t.'s — 
but von know hov\ it is with Scotclmicn. 

The nobility in the royal retiiuie were dressed 
(believe it or not) bv Riplev. but when it came 
the turn ol the lesser lights il was decided that a 
costumer eijuld be dispensed with, llii're being no 
more costumes. 

TIk- coroiialion went over with a big smash, llic 
crown being a rar(> work of art and the proilnci ol 
Mr. Ilarilv s quick lunch. Materials bv American 
Maid Milling ( iompanv (a<lv). 

Daiiililv clad llower girls strew rare eoriihusk 
(verv rare) rosidiuds along the path to the throne 
as the august assembly assembled. The lite ended 
when llie king ran off with the boid. 




>OT A .>i.vii>i<:> vovA<ii>; 

lly Mrs. I\ ill lliuil.lis 

I ai'ri\r(l liack in lnun. rri\ dears, jii^l in lirnr 

III catcli llii' lioat to SliniN licacli. ^dn >ci-. I wa- 

just retui'iiiiig lr<jni Kiirojje wlii'ic I Iraxrllcil alter 

winnino; the Ig-Nobel Prize for Demotion of Do- 
er t^ 

mestic Science. 

.Inst as wc (locked onr tn;^ at the Texas (_'oni- 
[janv wharf I saw a \onngisli crowd of sjjeciniens 
resenihlini; human l)ein<;s in all respects save at- 
tire, and riding n|p to the dock in (|u<'er \ehii les. 
1 was just sure mv Kice admirers had come to 
oreet me! But Dr. Lovett wasn't there and I dis- 
c<)\cred the Frosli were liavini; a hoat-ridc. 

Now I am a memln'J' <if the femaic lnlern|ier- 
ance League and Society for Prevention of Per- 
nicious Petting so I just jum|ied on hoard and an- 
nounced rn\ int<Mition of clia|ieroning. " rinTc 
nil! hi' no rnonke\ liusiness on this jaunt. i|uotli 
I. LNerxhoiU stood u|i and made tunin noises. 
"What does that meany"" I interrogaled. "Tliev 
are giving \ou the hoid. someone re|ilieil. 

Iimn\ tlic things some peo|)le give a\\av. Mr. 
j\lc(Jants Has going to give me in marriage to Dr. 
Theo Bald Blinkus (hefore we parted o\ er the 
ipicslion of sending pocket-handkerchiefs to the 



natives of Borneo). People sav I was 
the onl\ thing he ever ollered to give 
a « a \ . 

So the Nick-llaiil-l s rushed ns to 
,'^liiu\ Beach, despite mv sending mes- 
sage^ to the ( iajitain that we were 
lra\t'ling at too great a rale ol speed. 
I',ver\ hod\ wanted to go ill s\v imming 
so I gol on the lialhing suit I witvc in 
ihe Vutiipic fXhihit of the W orld's 
L nfair in BiSO. 

K\er\one just stood around when 
I came out and somehow I caught mv 
foot in the planks of llie pier. Down 
I went. \ \ oung lad helped me u|p hut 
he called me "\untv Emm\ . There 
mu.st ha\e hecu something wrong 
with his head. Me was so nice looking, 
too! 

(.^orumg home I saw thai at least 
one light sta\eil on — mv llashlight! 
EverM)ne hollered "Break " when 
tliev saw me coming. Kunnv — I 
wasn't lireaking a thing, \lavhe they 
were reciting Tennvson — "Break. 
Break, hreak. — I " But T got tired of 
Being iiight-w alchman. 

Someone hiou;;lil rue some siiila- 
w a t e r in a 
i{ lU'cr-shaped 
hottlel \fter 
that 1 went 
upstairs and 
told the Cap- 
tain what a 
cute Adam s 
apple he had! 
So the partv 
d i d n't t II r n 
out to he so 
had after all. 






*<rKriAIJST TM K 

This is nil ;i^c itl' s|)cci,i!isls. ;ni<l Hire in ;i|| |ici- iiiodcr iii I y has her own 
chaiiU-r nl' ihr Sprri;ilist ('hil). This is uiif ol' ihi' livcsl o[';;anizations on 
llic (';iTii|iiis. Mini h;is Ihc (hsliiict ion ol' linvint; its own cluh house, tho iL 
is nol ;is \('l ;iii iiMposiii^ si tiicI uri'. In Iih'I. many stuflents have not even 
iiiili( ci! Mm- nil "Its I U M Ir hnilihri^^- over by tin/ Icnnis courts, y)ifliirt'(l above. 
MRMBKHS 

How \i \ N \\ iM! I Ml N(; i (»\ II orlliv Ki'fpt-r of the Srroll 

M li W KM, Ml Reiiriiuj PresUh'ut 

H M 11 Aim I' 1. 1 I I I I IS . . lioiisp Molhi'r 

hiLi.'^ l)\\ iDsoN Griper-al-hiiyr 

( )s<: \it ('.Mini) T \i Bi-nr Puhlirily 

l*\\--^ Mil I I II FacuUy Superrisor 

I'.MiM- L\Mim>i' Rrprrsciilalive lo Phi Beta Krappa 

I ) \\ Si It \ I ION (ias 

.1 1 1 \ El !U S \i 1 1 1 1 . Overseer 

Sidm:\ .1. \\ II --ON. .lit - . - - . Underseer 

Nelson Hi s^i.i.i Chih Hero 

Lestkh H Si \n. I iff The Bov Who Fell Thru 

.H H, Pii 1^ OipilolisI 

I MM 111 I I -I I'.iuiH.w \ I i.H . Osieopolhie Ass}sliiiil 

llos-. I'oM. False Alfirin 

S \ MH.ns \.\ IIS Cot}suUinij Biologisf 

W III I \\i .lo--i wi T \t ion DeparlnienI of Physies 

\on\i \ \ W I-' \i SI 

I j)M»iMi K I m; I )o \K 

Si|-:\; \(IM'1,\IJ \o(K 
P\f K BxltlON 



\ iijN I Lonin ( '. 
.I<ni\ 'I'l' Mi'i I 



Direrlor of Chemical Researeh 

(Chairman Board of Secrecy 

Criiie 

Supplies 

W \\'\\\(. LIST 
I \iN Ji.MMiE Carroll 

Jlm McAshan 

Ml i-LLT'^n (fspi'rinllv an.rions) 



I 





>1.<.T. I. 

Il is snlV In s;i> ihiil no nif^iiiii/.ii liDn on ihr i-miii|ius Ii;is Iktm ttKnr n 
sliiKlivcIv l).ii,li<.iul lliMii Uu.' l^icu utiil ol Ihr W . C r. I . I !> ullir. r> iu . 
rollu\v«; 



Miss Auim.I'. \\ ii ^Rl■o^'. . , . 
Mips Ron < ' \iii i-ii . . 

M I-.-. S \\ \NN Mr ( il n \ Hill ^ . 

M I--S \\ II I I I N \ Ii I, \|i| II 



. . , Prrsiilrnl 

]-ia-^Prrsi,lrnl 

Srrrrlary 

i'n-iisiini 



M iss II \ noiniN \ I'.li \\\ N ttlslrihiiliii -iil'liiDir 

liul Ihcsc woillcM. will) ;il(' real li\r \\ iri's, s;i\\ lio itmsoii \vIi> IIic ^^ihhI 
work iiii^lil iiol be Uikni u[> hy a i'oi'r<-s|>oniliii|;; tM'^Miii/.al ion Minotii^ inni 
Ao(or(liiij;ly. lliey called in a number of llie oulslandiii;; rnrnersloins o| 
masculine lemperance in Ihe Institute, and put the pro[)C)silioi! beforr llutn 
The suHJjeslioii was immediately seized upon, and the charier membcis :irf 
shown liiii>. They are Morris Slack and (uis ('ranz. wlio bi'l'ore they saw llie 
li^dil wrn- Unown as llie l>runken Sislcr hood: Puiyeai \lims. who hrlon- 
sahalion l<»sl his ruoUi.-s al onr of Mrs. Harris's Drarnalir Chd. roiirab^-: 
Huj;h AvanI ol the Hall ('ornmillee: \csey: Thomas; (iarrison, of llie Stu- 
dent Association; Ru'liard Peliltils of the Specialist Club. The rest of Ihe 
boys seem to be in some way or other contiecled with Ihe Hally-at-lhe-beer- 
joint Club. They are Gresliam. Cooper, llinies, Hopkins — -also of the Honoi 
Council— Swanson. AVcbh (thr Irarhil sol). Wilson. Works. 












^ 




A! i 



— <s*" 



THi: LEUEND OF THE l>LOWMAI>f 





In tlie sweet by and by old Rowe Drake, hick fanner and ex-AtStM student, was 
•jjlowing in his garden and absentniindedly broke thru the crust of the earth. Fol- 
lowing the passage that was thus revealed, he came at length to 

a huge set of jaws that wagged incessantly. "Hello, Rowe! Guess 
yon don"t recognize nie. I'm the remains of Carmen Lewis. This is one of the realms of the 
Hereafter, wjjere all you have left is that part of your body that you used on earth." It was 
gad to see Carmen thus reduced, but really, all that was important about her was still intact. 
She kindly offered to point out some of Rowe's old class mates at Rice. First he came to a 
shoulder that he found to be quite cold. "That's Margaret Dunn. The eyes 
that keep rolling around every time someone passes ^7:^^?^ ■Sf^^^jp'' arc 
Marjorie Nicks. The big ears yonder C^SSfi^^ Y belong to Durell Carothers. He was 
always hunting dirt for the Rack." There was a sudden commotion as a 
pair of legs ran by, and Rowe recognized Claude Bracey without having 

is sheik Nelson Russell. That 
le used 





to bcTtold. "And this nicely combed set of hair T^^^ 

neck ^^ "^Sil^here is Mary llallie Berry. The sharp nose is Carl Illig. 




4 H^ 



to go snooping around ihc (Campanile office trying to find his picture. That stomach is 
Smokey 'Klearner^^ >m V i i -g* and the cranium is /\( \ ) ') Barnes Lathrop. 
The hand <;;v^ y 'I'<>1 l><>bs up and <lown is Handshaker Ridley, and iho two 

[/lRl\|lighlly closed mouths arc the two presidents, (Calvin Coolidgc and 
Eddie Lovett." 



I 



"Arc llicic aiiN more strange lands (Ii>\mi licre.''"" asketl Howe. "Yes, a leaj^ue up (lie roail 
is llie Land of Transmigration. Tlic departed souls tliere become the animal they most 
re.-^einbled."' Koue gladly made the journey, for he wished to see more of his old friends. 
Jle at once recognized .^(f^^^ V ' 'ger Wright and ^orilla^B^^^R? McCarhle. A 

horse ^^K?TS^ ^^ came up and whinnied ^Iff^'BlLa,'''''' ''*^ ^^* ^''' 
Chandler. But he galloped away at the sight oT T^RkJE^ \u tarantula. 




"Spider Webb!" exclaimed Rowe, and the meeting wa 




most fond, for they had 
once been brothers of the Thresher. Just then a ^Y^ '^"^"^ buzzed by. "Fate has fixed that 
old busy -body. Helen Williams," said .Spider. Tiieir conyersation was interrupted at this 
juncture by a loud braying. 7'''^. .^,^ "I see Harold Bell Wrjgkt, is as much a nui- 
sance here as elsewhere." .^V said Howe. An elepha^ 
came up. "Williams is the name," was the polite salutation. But 
he scam}»ered off in true elephant fashion at the appearance 

tiny mouse — Pauliiu' \ /^ MacDonald. Just then a dove passed overhead. "Marsliie used 

( 
to bill and coo too | | much," ^ (l^i) W said Spider. "But at that, she came out 

better thaii/cyaiolvn Walker," and he pointed to a giraffe. 

Howe ^^/a/te(^ /lo longer. He went tearing back to earth and 

instigated a tremendous reform. He resolved not to be the 

oat in any such business. (Note: all this is very philosophical.) 





'iXX i. \ ^& ViL 



«f 



\l % fl) 




Yes, a bliiidlblcl is tin.' only way lo ski> iniioccril '\i\ lliis wR-kcd world l>iil iiii'Ti't these co-eds slailiiiy loo litli' 



" t! : R •: 



i 




r I i> I i»-s r o I i> I. K s 



I-. \\ niMi:!! L \\1 \ I! . . 

< '. \ni. Ili,h. 
Russell Lel Jacobe 
William Hartman. . . 
Barnes Lathbop. . - 
Allen Caldwell. 

Aubrey Cai.vin 

Edgar Altknhi hc. . . 



LiiLi i: l>L \Ki: 

Lll,LI \N I Icim.OCK 

i\lAR,l(l(n DuN> 

Nan(:\ Korbks 

M Mi-i Ui;tt^ Weatiiebei) 

M \ll^ n ARRET. 
_\I \R\ hARNES 

Marie Couohlin 



< ;i s (_'.n \N/, I . \ i>^ ( i t HI m in: C<n\ w 

M \HMi \i, S i,N<;( iM.) Iom: SpE^^;l■: 

l^)iLLiE Davidson Mahcelle KTi\<; 

.loE Ea<;I:E Eleanor Barnes 

Sanders Lvles Celeste Olivari 

John Ridley Elizabeth Washburn 

Spencer Scott CiiahloitI'] (^ollins 

HiiDOLPn Weiciieiit Mari Li/, Tisuai.i; 




THE Plan HES 

Row ONE, L. lo \\. 
Dorothy Bclhany 
Charlolle Collins 
Marshall Ferguson 
Eula A. Goss 

Ro^\ TWO. L 1.) \\. 
Ev. lli-inliolhiun 
A'lary:ar('l Hooks 
Loula B. .lohnsoti 
Jessie O. Jones 
HowTiiHEr. L. lo H. 
Doroliiv Learned 
Marji. MrCarlln 
Calii. Muiil^ornery 

How Foi H, K. h. li, 
Cleo S<'^nsl 
Betsy Slau^'hler 
lone Spenre 
Row FIVE, L. lo B. 
Awilda Sieves 
Virginia Vinson 
Eliz. Washburn 





T4»0 4.iOOU TO LKAVii: 

Ol T e:vtirklv! 

It was painful enoiigli lo 
leave ihem out of tlie Vanity 
Fair section. We are tryiuf: to 
find some consolation by in<lu(l- 
iufi the rest of twentv-five liore. 

The twentv-five candidates 
\\ere chosen this year by a ballot 
of representative students h<>l<l- 
iuf: elective oflfice. or |>ri>uiin('nt 
in the affairs of the several fac- 
tions of the student body. Tiie 
final selection was the residt of 
three o[iinions. that of Mr. Wil- 
ford Sleduiau. the artist for tiie 
hook. Mrs. ,(. W. Northrop, 
local portrait artist, and the 
ballot of representative student 
()|)inion. The section shows how 
the j;irls stack up wiicn chosen 
bv the fairest un-thod the editor 
could conceive. If yon still 
aren't satisfied — well, may God 
bless you! You never will be. 



I 



EDITOK'S l*A4>K 



In tlio (lid <la\s in Ti'xa*. tlic cdwIkivs used to 
get lit up at their danees. and if tliev didn'l like 
the niusie. thev took a shot or so at the fiddler. On 
one occasion the fiddler hung up a sign. "Don't 
shoot the fiddler: lies doing the liest he can." 
\^ e reconnnend that all knoekers treat oiu <l- 
forts in the spirit suggested h\ that plaeanl. Mie 
IJneoln once said. "Don t swa|> horses in the uiiil- 
dle of the stream. ' Jt gets vou into all sorts of dil- 
ficidties. Yet that is just what had to lie done in 
the busiiH'ss managership (d this Cam|ianile. If 
the student liod\ sullered. so did the assistant 
business manager, and so did the editor. Ihe lat- 
ter found himself serving as eani|ius photograjiher 
gratis and <loing a lot of work that the engravers 
are normalU paid to do in ord<'r to put out the 
book he had |)lanned and alreadv half executed. 

The editor would like to r<-idnnuend to the ^^i^e 
heads of the Student Association that the\ fignre 
out some scheme — based on a sinking fund per- 
haps — whereby an editor is guaranlee<l a definite 
sum. And while the suggestions are Houing. this 
editor \\ould like to venture the opinion that hand- 
ling publications as concessions is a mistake. If 
the etlitor is to be paid, the sum should be small 
and definite. If it is other than small, students arc 
apt to take the altitude. "The editor gets paid: 
let him worry." The annual y\ill never come out on 
time if looked at in that yvav. 1 1 is a large enter- 
prize that deinantls co-operation, and the student 
bodv as a yvhole should give assistants more credit 
for yvhat thev do. 

As Jack (ilenn put it in \')'1(k being business 
manager should be a big money job. And he 
shoidd yvork for the Student Association, yvhicli 
should certainly assume all financial risk. 

And noyv. — please note yvitli patience thes<- 
points about the annual as it has finally come 
to be — points yvhich the editor has yvorried and 
troubled a lot over and doesnt want vou to miss. 

The subject matter is handleil in the modern 
fashion noyv being employed in such maga/ine>- as 
f oguf. Modes (iiiil Mdimcrs. Ihirini s li(iz(i<ir anil 
other leaders of the present trend in y\liicli jiictures 
are giy en black borders and blocks of ty|(e are 
used as a dislincti\ e part of the page design. 

The division and subdivision pages are modern- 
istic studies in still life. They do not form a con- 
nected story but symbolize the contents of the 
pages which follow them. The ibree-ciilor plates 



are jirinted from liand-<iit parazin 
blo,ks. 

riie l«o coliuun scheme uas made 
possible by the horizontal borders, 
yvhich |)ermitted a chan;;c in the di- 
mensions of the t \ pe area. Tlie new 
arrangement gave much gri'ater free- 
dom in lavDut variation, and an at- 
tempt uas made to carry the modern- 
istic feeding into the page designs. Mr. 
.Stedman y\as of invaluable assistance 
here, and to him is due the credit for 
the unity ubicli the book possesses. 
Setting in tuo coluimis means more 
work lor the printer, but the Rein 
('onipany co-operated checrl'ullv and 
uithont complaint. 

IIk' absence of big <'mpty spaces in 
this book, the balancing of opposing 
pages, and the regularity uilli uliicli 
type and pictures together form a 
block, are not accidents or triiks of 
the |irinler's art. Tlie write-ups had 
to be of a prescribed length, no more, 
no less. 'Phis entailed a vast amount of 
editorial uork. but we beli<'ve that as 
a result y\ c have given vou one of the 
uniipie annuals of the connlr\ . 

(Campanile associations will always 
be a [ileasant memory of every editor, 
and so it has been this vear. \11 help 
that the student bodv has offered has 
been accepted at once, and assistance 
has often come from unexpected 
(jnarters. The editor is utterly con- 
vinced that, as the saving goes. "The 
Lord takes care of his fools, lie is ex- 
tremely thankful to all who have 
helped. Init on this occasion yvishes to 
thank especially the Lusters and the 
Parke l.ngraving Cimpany. Both 
have given \sonderfid co-operation 
and seemed u illing to do any thing for 
the Campanile. I'>verv student who 
was photographed for the class sec- 
tion is pictured in every group he be- 
longs to. Never before has there been 
such a complete photographic repre- 
sentation, and for these and all mer- 
cies the editor is extremelv thankful. 



M ^ 



i 


' 






,^..: ■ . 


1 


J 


1 










g 


^MH^9 




fe 




1 


^^H 


bH 


BKi'-g^^fej 


rag^. 




'^n 


^^^1 


HH 


|E'^^^I 


Wmp 


. 


^^«|9 


^H 


H 




hH 


^1 


^Sm 


H 


H 




B 




3 


1 




BH 












^^BHH 




, .Am 


|_ 








1 



feiSii, 



^h 



'■"*'#■' 




4, 

10^ 



''Dinner at San Jacinto Inn 

. . . ." where the service is super]) and the 
foods delicious. Oysters, Fish, Shrimp, Chick- 
en .. . prepared in the most appetiziu" way. 
Ask Lono; Distance for San Jacinto Inn . . . 
say when and how many . . . then leave it to 
us . , . well do the rest. 

S a 11 Jacinto Inn 

AT THE BATTLE GROUND 



;5i 



1^ 




From the Life of School 

to the School of Life 



T INKED inseparatelv willi llie success- 
ful business man is an office of refine- 
nient anil efHciencv. And this applies not 
to iuinitme alone l>ut to the iniillituile of 
record keeping devices that jicipctnate 
business. \\ ithin the Wilson organization 
are office speciahsts who can help solve 



vour problems when von emerge from "the 
life of school to the school of life." 

And here at Wilsons vou bviv confi- 
dentlv. knowing the price is right, that 
years of constant grow th in the stationery 
and office supplv field is in itsell proof posi- 
tive of a progressive policy and plan. 



Two Stores 

.508-10 FANNIN & 
1103 MAIN ST. 



"A PLEASURE TO SHOW YOU" 

WIL SON SS^pSn™! (J3. 



HOUSTON 
TEXAS 



JNO. McCLELLAN, Presiclenl 




Svraciise China used at 
Rice Institute 



W. C. PROW SE. Manager 



We Sell 



the most comprehensive line of China 
manufactured. Tlie most distinctive, 
practical and beautiful designs created 

for 

INSTITUTIONS, CAFETERIAS 

HOTELS. CLUBS, RESTAURANTS 

DINING CARS, SI 111^ USE AND 

HOSPITALS 



TJie hirgpst displuy of Dinner ivarc in theSonth nest, inclndingall 
good goods f rum Ion price to finest 

JNO. McCLELLAN & CO., Inc. 

CHINA -GLAtfy\VARE-SlI.\ l-;in\ Aid-.- Ai.I MIM'MW AMK - CV II.EHV - KITCHKN MACHINERY 

Corner Walnut and Conti 






t^'O) 



Compliments of 

SOUTH TEXAS COTTON OIL 
COMPANY 

Miinujiivturcrs (if 

PLATO 




SALAD OIL 



and 



PANCRUST 




^^ 



PANCRUST 



1 '''■'■ r AwcT cooK iHa 

'*''U«£VtOETABllf»'' 



y 



SHORTENING 



T^s*- 



•■4 



Q^ 



jJiiS) 



All f:<>0(l uishes to ihe ^riuluates, students 
<iu(l I (iiiilty of 

RICE 

May \oii ever reflect credit to that f;re(it 
iiistitittion trhich is itutliinf; such a ivorthy 
contribution to your success. 

Dale C. Rogers 



Our plant is thoroujililv tcjuipped 
for the complete printiiifr ol newspapers, piiblications and cir- 
culars. Our stereotype foundry is the largest in the Soutli. 

WESTERN NEWSPAPER UNION 



F. A. HANNAH. Manager 

.ird Flcior Grral S.iiUhrrji I'.ld};. 



llouNli) 



T«o riionos 



Two Plants 



A Purer -than-water Ice 

Miinurarlurcd ixriiisi vcly h\ 

Texas Ice & Fuel Co. 



6301 HHrrisbur^ Boulevard 
Phone W. 2072 



4702 Caiiiil Street 
Plionc W. 7164 






I 



■^1 



,^S 



BANKING 

and the Young Man in Business 




KKESPECTivE of the busiiiess or profession you 
pursue a bank will plav an important part toward 
the attainment of success. Austere, experienced 
executives are today selecting and advanciiiif 
\<nm<: Mien ou more than ability alone. \our 
ability to progress financially is a vital considera- 
tion. 



To be an institution that is able to serve in this 
capacity ... to be able to advise and counsel 
vounp men in their financial problems ... to suf;- 
gest and aid in the safe in\ estment of funds ... to 
assist in the establishment of estates . . . has al- 
ways been an impelling idea of the National Hank 
of CJonnnerce. It is a service which you ar<' in- 
vited to use frefpiently . . . and literalK . 

Whatever financial problems you ma\ have we 
will be glad to discuss them with voti. 



The National Bank of Commerce 



Capital 
$1,000,000 



HOUSTON 
TEXAS 



Surplus 
12.000,000 



(gW*"" 






r 



=,<^# 



Compliments of 

CROW AND LAMBERTH 



EDWARD S. BOVLES 
RISSELL SCOTT 
GAINER B. JONES 

RUTH HASTINGS 



I.. D. BROWN 
E. F. GIBBONS 
IRANK G. DYER 

W. H. WATTS 



J. T. SCOTT. JR. 
PAT N. FAHEV 
MILLER ALEXANDER 
JO S. SHAW 



BOYLES, BROWN & SCOTT 
LAW VERS 

First National Bank Buililing 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 



BROWNE RICE 



CRAIG BELK 



FRANK CLARKE 



RICE & BELK 

General Insurance 



CHRONICLE BUILDING 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 



ANDREWS, STREETMAN, LOGUE & MOBLEY 



FRANK ANDREWS 
SAM STREETMAN 
JNO. G. LOGUE 
JNO. A. MOBLEY 
W. L. COOK 
ROBERT H. KELLEY 
M. E. KURTH 



Attorneys at Laav 

ROBERT F. CAMPBELL 
E. J. FOUNTAIN. JR. 
J. R. STONE 
j. L. LOCKETT 
S. J. THOMAS 
PALMER BRADLEY 
J. R. ANDREWS 



W. M. STREETMAN 
RICHARD F. BURNS 
JAMES E. KILDAY 
THOMAS A. SLACK 
HOMER E. MABRY 
HARRY R. JONES 
LESTER B. CLARK 



Union National Bank Bnildin" 
HOUSTON. TEXAS 






'^^ 



i^- 



f 



liiiip) 



=t-)l^v 




To All Rice Students 



?^5.f^£ te:vHft 






t'i' 



ill 



J 



h 



i^ 



I Your school days are happy 

j ones that have been almost 

, free from the realities that 

li you must face after you are 

I graduated from college . . . 

' Gay leisure hotirs between 

i classes . . . loiterinsj m shad- 

"''S^^'^tiir^iLL 'a ^\ owed cloisters . . . mingling 

21 -J -^'u^P'ST^' - "^ with happy groups m the 

?) 3 ^^1 (ii, (jw J j ^ i -liS, sallyport . . . vibrant with 






u 



. vibrant wit 

siasm at athletic e- 

vents . . . discussing every- 

from marriage to 



i.l»«.f 



i^^ thing 

'' i metaphysics . . . drifting in 



kaleidoscopic colors at the 
proms . . . rustle of silk and measured movement punctuated by 
soft, rhythmic notes . . . Quickly these things slip into the glorious 
past . . . 'though they lose none of their vividness in your memory. 

In later years you'll find most of your freedom and happiness will 
depend upon your financial independence . . . You have a wealth of 
knowledge now, and in the following years you can, by careful and 
consistent management, acquire material wealth. Perhaps you are 
not fully acquainted with all the various services that the Second 
National Bank can render you. We would enjoy having you visit 
our bank and become acquainted with our offices and personnel as 
well as the financial facilities we can offer you. 

THE SECOND NATIONAL BANK 

Main at Rusk 
HOUSTON 



(grf 










LYKES BROTHERS 
STEAMSHIP CO. 



FREIGHT AND PASSENGER 

SERJICE 

to the 

WEST INDIES 




BOOKS 

OF KVERY KIND 



STATIONERY 

Fountain I'cn and Pencil Sets 

Address Books Diaries 

(College Supplies 

Bocksellers to Houston ibr more than 30 years 



C. A. ROBERTLS, B.S., D.C. 
CHIROPRVCTOK 

Ptihi„-r Cniiliiali- 



Seventli Floor Mason Huildiiig 
Houston. Tkws 



Everything in Music 

Tlios. Goiisan & Bro. 

The Music Hoi se ok Texas 

Fi,nii,ir,i isat: 
1010-12 Main Street 



^ , 
@^" 



"^b 



.•i'lryi 




Reed Rotary Drilling Tools are designed and manufactured by 
highly trained engineers and skilled craftsmen. 

The increasingly rapid development of the oil industry and the 
particularly exacting requirements in its production demand the 
services of highly trained engineers. 

We hope that from among the students in the engineering 
school at Rice Institute will coine many of the future leaders 
in the petroleum industry and its related activities, and that we 
might incorporate some of them into our organization. 

To Rice students desiring to make a permanent connection with 
us we will gladly give a personal interview, and we hope that 
many lasting contacts will result. 

REED ROLLER BIT COMPANY 



Houston 



Los Angeles 






:v 



r- 



=*^ 




SPALDING 




EQUIPMENT 



CORRECT 




SPORT 



Spalding has been making 
outhenhc athletic equipment for 
53 yea's. You can choose your 
complete outfit with the knowlecJge 
thot everything ii e^octly righl, ' 



lOllCuiiilol Ave 



Coiupliiiwnts of 

TEXAS OPTICAL CO. 

COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE 



706 Fannin 



Fairfax 1022 



^Hoitsioifs Busiest Store'' 



• *^ 




TBEnEEsna 



Always First 

with every new Vogue 



FIRST IN QUALITY 

BEST IN VALUE 
LOWEST IN PRICE 



©V5^ 



4 



Jio) 



=<^ 



Hughes Tools used 

iu the roltuv fields 

ihroughoul the 

world. 





Hughes Tools used 

iu the rotarv fields 

throughout the 

Horld. 



Compliments of 

HUGHES TOOL COMPANY 

MAIN OFFICE AND PLANT 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



(gv^ 



■^b) 



i 



t^m 



r 







iir he(trt\ coiigratiihttions 
and best wishes to 



THE WISE YOUNG OWL 



Modern service of a modern 
fuel . . . Natural Gas in weld- 
ed steel mains . . . comfort 
and convenience with safct\ . 

Frestoii 1656 




MILES FIFTY 

FIVE CAN RIDE FOR PRICE OF ONE 

Yellow Cab 

PRES. 02 50 F>RES. 



A. D. SORY. President 



Brazos Valley Buick Company 



INC.()I?P()H\ TKI) 



Service Station and Parts Dcpartnicnl 
Corner Caroline anil Hell 



Sales Rooms and Main Office 
Corner Milam and Clay 

PHONE FAIRFAX 6131 



07f^ 






^, 



STORE 

'W t/?e /arqest 
■in T/je/ar^ft 

STATE 




"//ousfonOu/zied- 
J^OMitvn M/nded " 




FOLEY BROS. >> LARGE ST STORE IN HOUSTON 

iMcii'^urtii liy an> y;inlslick. Foley l>ros. is Houston's hir^TsI slon-. Lur^'csl in sali's 
\nlunii' . . lar^csl in slure area . . . lar;j;('Ml in wealth and breadth of its merchandise 
slocks . . . largest in man i>ower and woman power. We are trying our best to kec|i l'^)lc 



^ Bros, bi^- and broad in the estimation of its many, many customers and friends. 



HOUSTON»LARGEST CITY IN TEXAS 

Houston is Texas' hirticsl rollnn port . , . hir^csl railroaii center . . . has the hirjiest public 
school enrollmenl . . the lariLrest industrial background . . . and is the fastest growing 
city in Texas. In poptilalinn Houston shares honors with Harris ('ounly. wliicli numbers 
more citizens llian ati> nllirr ronnt> In llie Slate. 



TEXAS»LARGEST STATE IN THE UNION 

Texas produces more lolton and sulphur than any nlhei Stale and leads all Slates in 
cattle raising. Texas contains 265,896 square miles . mure than the combinetl areas 

of Vermont. Rhode Island. New Jersey. New Hampsliire. Massachusetts, Delaware- 
Co tun '<■ lieu i. Indiana, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, kml uek > and \ laltama. 



iUPa VALUE! 
EVEHy DAY at 




^HOUSTON'S 
E^ LARGEST STORC- 



(g^ 



r 



*^g) 



. . . theres something about college men . . . von recognize it easily . . . that 
makes association with them ahvavs pleasant . . . 

. . . of course von want to cunliniic the olil acijuaintances vou made at the 
Alma Malir . . . an<l nmke nc« ones . . . drop in the L niversitv CInh . . . 
for a friendiv few minutes of Ipowling ... a iirisk game of ping-pong . . i 
loimge aroinid in deep luxurious chairs in a niellow fraternal atmosphere 
. . . cnjoN a ipjiel witli a "lirolhcr horn an eastern chapter . . . revive the 
old "bull sessions" with the "beaux esprits" at the mavericks' table . . . 
join the gaielv at the dances, remendter that red-headed Kappa from State? 
. . . entertain \iiur oul-of-tou n guests in the private rooms at the club . . . 

. . . the glamour and charm of college da\s and the inspiring progressiveness 
of college men radiates from c\crv corner of 

THE UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Knsk a I La Branch 
Houston 



Vinson Elkins Sweeton & Weems 



Atlorneys At Law 



Niels Esperson Building 



Hoviston, Texas 



i 






(^g) 



IN HOUSTON 



^ (iii'll find a 1110:^1 cordial and 
lii'artv uelconic awailing \(in at 
tliese superb liotels. 

Tho. their niodernitv and refine- 
ment is typical iif your expecta- 
tions of hotel coniiiirl llii'v retain 
all tlie finesse and pleasantries of 
the traditional Soiilhern llos|>i- 
laiity. 

SkillinI attendants ulio antici- 
pate voiu' ever\ ncc<l roponil 
(jnicklv to voiir wisii lor coinleous 
service. Conifortalde rooms and 
suites — spacious l()l)hics — famed 
dining rooms and calclcrias — 
shops of every nature auti every 
other convenience collaborate to 
make vour sta\ hen- a most en- 
jo\able one. 



The 

Texas State 
Hotel 

Houston's neiiest and niosi 
modern, from both the slimd- 
[xiint of serriee and (ij>j}iiinl- 
ments. 400 rooms al S2.50 
and up. leith hath . . . and 
W HAT a bath. 

R. BruL-c C;irli'r. Mtir. 
C. S. Pryor. Bra. AJfir. 



The 

Rice Hotel 

JOOO outside rooms . . . ihorolv 
moilern appointments . . . complete 
services . . . iariie sample rooms. 
Dining Rooms. Private Meeting 
Rooms. Coffee Sliof). Cafeteria. 
Barber ShofK Ladies' Heoulv t'ar- 
lor. Turkish Baths. Railroad Trans- 
portation Center. Rooms S2 and uj). 

B F. On, Mijr. 



The 

Lamar 
Hotel 

500 rooms, including apart- 
ments and suites. A quiet, 
dignified Hotel of Service. 
Rotes ■$!'..)(> ((/((/ ((/). 

B. Bruce Cnrler. Miir. 






•4 



^® 



(8.^ 

■% 



-At^B 



Cdiiipliiiii'iils oj 



Kill", Wood and Morrow 



LAWYERS 



When \ our Clothes Get a 

"Dirty Deal"' 

and Everything Looks 

Black 




think of 

BURKHART'S 

LAUNDRY & DYE WORKS 

"We I'linl ) our C.lolhos II liitr" 



The Ice Used in This City is Furnished 

by Port Citv Ice Delivery. Our Routes 

Cover tiie City. 

FOR SERVICE— CALL— 




Port City Ice 
Delivery 



Preston 5Q00 

Sate W illi 

Ice 



n e art' 100 per cent 
Behind Rice Instilitte 



Invt'stiiridi' Iho 



tJsatex "SpFing-Air" 

INNER spHiNc \i\'nni:ss 

100' f Huushiii Prodiicl. 



USATEX MANUFACTURING CO. 

Frerlerick Piirkcr. Prcs. 

Cill Prist. >ii l:',l.-, cir l:(l(> 
'•MiiUresscs lirroralnl Hiiihf 



J 



( tinipliinciils <>l 



FRED J. CAMPBELL 



(g^'^ 



@^, jj^o' 



r 



Complimeuts of 

JESSE H. JONES 



(£77?^ " '^ to) 






•''yj ) 



Compliments of 

HOUSTON LABOR JOURNAL 

Printers oj the Thresher 



1927-1928 



1929-1930 



York Ice Machinery Corporation 

York. Pa. 
WESTKRN DIVISION 

2201-2211 Texas Avenue Il(iUston, Texas 

Faet(jiv ) Dallas Ne« Orleans Houston 

Branelies | El Paso Slirevepcrt Abilene 

\ isit onr plant \\liere we do mir pipe bending and welding of coils ami lieaders 
Kvervtiiini' lor the lee Plant or Refrirreration 



§t ©lb College inn 

It is more tlmn an eating place 
It is part of your college days 



r 



1^ 

e 




Lndissolubly 
"I-" linked with 
the commer» 
ce of Houfton.f rom the 
days of ox-team and 
tarSe transportation 
to this day when \% rail- 
roads meet 64 Beamshif lines 



THE 



H 



IRST 

-^ CVaTIONAL TiANK 

OF Houston ■ ■ 



57'*" 






r 



r= 






WM. S. B\M.K> 



E. R. DISCllER 



W. S. BAILEY & CO. 

Complete Insurance Service 



()04-r) |{aiik<Ts Moit.'asf liiiildiiit; 



F\iRFV\ L\H22 



HOUSTON. TEXAS 




11 Swccnq Jewelry VD. 

->700MA|IV STREET CORNEtl CAPITOL <- 



'It ((ime from .Sa'eeziej's" 



iCTTf^ 






qisi, 



If 



The Reason Why Most Cities in Texas are Called 
■•"Smokeless" is Because the Doniiiiatiiiii Fuel Used 
is: 



NATURAL GAS 

NATURE'S GIFT 



Natural Ga.< is Clean, Safe, Low in (^otit. \ou <lo not order it 
months in advance. \ou pav for gas after von have used it. It 
does not require storage space on ones premises. 



The Leading Distributors of Natural Gas 
in South Texas are the subsidiaries of: 




V UNITED GAS^ CQMPANV/ 

yioodij Scagmves ^ J^ianagemcnt^^ 

Esperson Building Houston. Texas 

(Serving HOUSTON through the HOUSTON GAS & FUEL CO.) 












^J^hC d 11 " n " " I 



1^:1:3, 



Complete 



Financidl 



Service 



1-s sii inijA -•-■,.. 



Banking Depniintml 

Checking' accouiils ul lirms, corporations, banks, 
aufi individuals. 

Savings Drparhiiciii 

InterosI compounded semi-annually on Saving's 
Deposits at llie rale of 1^ per annum. 

Trust Ih'parlrnrFil 

Acts as Kxrciilor. Truslee or \dininislrator Cor 
individuals, and as rriislec under cori-orate morl- 



Safply Deposit Drpartniml 

Henls Sality De[)osil Boxes, receipts for and 
liaiidles lille papers, bonds or notes for individu- 
als, crt'ditint-' collections to customer's account. 
Provides vault space lor storage of silverware and 
valuable articles of bulk. 

Bond Dcpitrtiiirnt 

Buys and sells lii^h j^rade corporation, railroad, 
and municipal bonds, and all issues of United 
Sillies (;<>\rrniii<'[|l sr.'iirilies. 

Mdiigagr Invcsltiwrit iJtfHirtmcnl 
Our loans are securerl by revenue-bearing city 
real estate and are dividerl into de lominations of 
SlOO to SlOOO so iIkiI an> anioiinl <l. sired may be 
invested. 

Tiiiir hrpiisil I )rp<iilnii-nt 

Int. -rest piiid oil Tim.- ( '.ei I i fien les of Oeposil al 
lilt' r.llr ol' r , pri Miiiilllii 

lU-uUil mai Hrnl Estair I irpnitnirnl 

Colle<ls real and looks al'ler paymeni of taxes 
and insuraiire !'>ii\s nnd sells real estate for 
clients. 

GUARntAN TRUST CO. 



Espersou Biiildint: 



F. 5101 



KNOWING HOW 
SPELLS SUCCESS 

The grow til of this lauiiilis. ulii<li is phe- 
nomenal, is due, we estimate, to the high 
iHialitv of work rendered at all times. 

Kaeli article yon send ns is drv cleaned, 
lamidered, or dved with nimost care and 
craftsmanship, insnring tiic (inest work 
]>ossil)le and longer life for each article. 

PHONE PRESTON li:^7 

RICE HOTEL 
LAUNDRY 

Louisiana al \\ alkcr 



■•Clothex of Quality- 
Main atCapiUA 



Nathan's 
Clothes 

t\iithfully 
reflect the 

taste of 

University 

men 







'f* ^^ — ""- — ~ ■= — ■ "nf 


SOUTH 


TEXAS 


COMMERCIAL 


NATIONAL 


BANK 


fc" ' — " "^1 



(Cj^ 



AMERICAN TITLE GUARANTY COMPANY 

Third Floor Esperson Building 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 



INSURES LAND TITLES 
IN ALL PARTS OF TEXAS 

HARRIS COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Frank J. Breaker, Mcmager 

ABSTRACTS OF TITLES 
FAIRFAX 5191 



J/te PERTECT TOWEl/ 




NOW SERVING 

COLLEGES 

SCHOOLS 

OFFICE BUILDINGS 

HOTELS 

INDUSTRIALS 

\sith 

NIBKOC 

Tlie perfect towel 



i=^= 
@^- 



HOUSTON PAPER (a 



814 COMMERCE 



■J 



C>Sli4 



¥ 



"SAXET" 



ICE CREAM IS THE BEST 



MANLFACTIRKD HV 



SAXET ICE & ICE CREAM CO. 



PRESTON 3630 HOUSTON, TEXAS 



FIRST in the GET A WA Y 

For the man witli sporting lilood. tliere is a real tlirill in the surfuing power of Klash- 
Hke Gasoline. Press the starter and vonr motor awakens instantU . In a tnrn or two 
of the erankshaft. fnll power is developed. Shift gears, step on tlie ilirotlle. Von get 
resnits such as vou have never fell hefore! 

Flashlike (Gasoline makes any ear — new or old — rnn smoothlv and poHerfnllv- 
Easy starting — fast getawav. willii>nt sputtering — velvetv release of power — elean 
combustion, with less motor oil dilution and full mileage per gallon, are all eomltined 
in Flaslilike Gasoline to give vou the thrill of flaslilike motoring — and at the price 
of ordinarv gasoline. 



HUMBLE 



,SHt4 



SOLINE 

Hiiml)le Oil & Refining Company 

iT . ^ /k 









\ 






,:i.5.ii5iv?- 



Complinieutsof 

Houston National Bank 



The 

TENNANT CO. 

CONSULTING AND 
CONSTRUCTING ENGINKEKS 

•^ 

(.'.(imnlflf I'liKcr I'ltint Ih'sisn 



tiiid Equijinifnt 






IK )LSrON, TEXAS 



Gowns -Hoods -Caps 



for All Degrees 

}f (• (,iiitriiiUi'i>: 

SELECTIVE MATERIALS 

ACCURACY IN DETAIL 

REASONABLE PRICES 

SUPERIOR WORKMANSHIP 

Full Information Sent on Request 



An Olil iinil Hclidlilc lirni 
Estiihlislwil in IH32 

COTRELL cK; LEONARD 

COLLEGE DEPT. 

Albany. N. Y. 



o^ 



-.J^ 

*^&) 



•>S) 



TEXACO 



Stands lor Excellent and Uniforni( )iialitv ot Petroleum Products 



NEW AND BETTER TEXACO GASOLINE 

LoH End Point - High J ohiiiliiv 
The Drv Gas - hfore ^[iles Per (Gallon 



TEXACO MOTOR OIL 

('Iran. Clear, (jolden Motor Oil 
The Luhriealing Film that (iires the I'erfeet Seal 



Scientific care, such as exists in almost no other industry, is daily practiced in the 
laboratories of each of Texaco's 17 inodern refineries. Thousands of samples 
constantly pour in from the stills, agitators and filters . . . over 3 million refinery 
tests a year. 

This almost incredible care is typical of Texaco ideals. It accounts in no small 
degree for the rapid and sustained growth of The Texas Company . . . for the 
matchless success of Texaco Products in every industry, not only in each of our 48 
states but throughout the entire civilized world. 

Today, leading industrialists and experienced motorists everywhere turn to the 
Texaco Red Star with the Green T for superior fuels and safer, more dependable 
lubricants. 



-m 



^TE^cox THE TEXAS COMPANY 

^ Mr'^^ J Agents Everywhere 




(ijr^ 



•4 



=1*^5' 



INTERURBAN 



TO AND FROM 



GALVESTON 



EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 



(;AL\ ESTON-HOUSTON ELECTRIC RAILWAY CO. 

Jeff L. Alexander. Maiiagcr 
Fairfax 7171 






m 







!rS 





/%==%* 
I 




Fashion's Path Leads To MUNN'S The Stun- Of Youth 



-'*5^b 



■^" 



Long and Short Leaf Yellow Pine 
Son them Hardwoods 



LUMBER TIMBER 

TIES 



Kirby Lumber Company 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Ask your retail dealer for -KmBY"S STOCK' 



il , -_ ,1 'i 



Q!lj, 



LSilS) 



BICKLEY BROTHERS 



Dm.l\- 



710 MiLVM St.. lloLSTON, Texas 



Sv>' An TO MO 



COMPLETE LINE OF SCHOOL THEATRE. CHURCH AND 
OFFICE EUR.MTURE AND EQUIPMENT 



HEY\VOOI)-\'i VKEFIELD Co. 



National School Equipment Co. 



KKWMNKK 

Labor;! tory 

Furniluro 

HILL-STANDAHD 

Complete Playf.'roiinil 



C'nnpleli^ lines of Cldssrfumi and Alidiioriuni Scatini/ 

S. A. MAXW h:i.l. CDMl'ANY 

School liooni Shmlt'.s 

VALLEYCO COMPANY 

BLACKBOARDS 



S I LdckcTs an. I 

C.abi.lfls 

CHIC.ACO 
Ciyiiinasiiini Ktlliipment 



Maps. Gloltes. Chalk. Erasers uiul Miscellaneous Sujijilies 
Also Complete Line of Office f'urnilure 



SCREENS 

FOR OILAND WATER PRODUCTION 



Layne Milled 
(Ti'oove Screen 

The greater production Layne Milled 
Groove Screen is Oil Industry's latest, 
greatest and most important develop- 
ment; IS e.xclusive and assures the greatest 
possible production because of greater 
inlet area . . . strength to safely stand the 
full weight of more than 8,000 feet of 
drilled pipe. 

Layne screen is used for oil and water 
wells throughout the country. 

LAYNE & BOWLER CO. 

IIOI S'lON. TEXAS 

"Serrin" llic Oil I nduslrv" 



Water WeHs 

"No Water— No Pay" 

This policy pursued consistently for near- 
ly 50 years has built our national reputa- 
tion of providing dependable water sup- 
ply for municipal, industrial and irriga- 
tion purposes. 

Layne deep well turbine pumps in Layne 
wells give undivided responsibility be- 
hind the guarantee. 

LAYNE-TEXAS CO. 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

"Serrinfi the It ater Sn/iplv Indiislrv'^ 



ij_^ 
t§^ 



(QStn 



.^slLO 



Electricity 

WHEN AND WHERE YOU WANT IT ! 




Is your home so arranged that you are getting the 
best service from this wonderful servant 
of mankind? 

Let our experts advise with you. 

HOUSTON LIGHTING & 
POWER COMPANY. 



iffT^ 



I 



W hen Good PelloH's ivdiit Good GlotJiPs 

tlu'x come to 

LEOPOLD & PRICE 

THE HOUSE ()[•' KLTFENHEIMEH GOOD CLOTHES 
FOR 23 YEARS 

509 MAIN ST. 



TRY 




HOUSTON 



ALSO HOSIF.K) 



SHOES 



GALNESTON 



JAS. P. HOUSTOUN 



GEO. A. TYLER 



LOUIS A. STEVENSOX 



HOUSTOUN & TYLER 

INSURANCE 

Complete "Hartford" Service 

Private Bramli Exihange: Preston 16Q2 

See Inside Bach C.oier of lelejilione IHreclory 






Our Miitlo 
Serrii-e (iiul l>ej)endiil>ililY 

S. L. RICHARDS CORP. 

SODA FOUNTAINS 
FOUNTAIN AND JANITOR SUPPLIES 



Phones: 
Fairfax 2360-2369 



608 Dallas Street 
Houston, Texas 



-'■H^l 



§1^ 



43 years old . . . but 
young in spirit 



Paradoxical? No — modern! Age is no lonser a har 
to youthfulness. Age is wisdom. And wisdom, iti 
this case is voutlifiilness. Lew's is modern — 
young in spirit. Today l^evv's caters to folks like 
you at Rice. ^ ou folks who arc the up-an-doers 
o( the future. Back of Lew's vouthfid spirit is 
one of America's beautifid stores, the most mod- 
<'rn store in Houston. 

Lew's gives \ou the service \ou expect of a 
modern store. Lew's expert style organization, 
whose representatives comb New York constant- 
ly, presents xou with fashion-right merchandise 
at all times and at reasonable prices. 

Lew's is your store today — just as it was \our 
grandmother's and ^ our mother's in the past. 



LEVY'S 

LEVY BROS. DRY GOODS CO. 



OT^ 



■ ■"fi , 



C.onipli lit ('Ills (>l 



E. T. GRAIN 



HOUSTON READY- CUT HOUSE COMPANY 

Successor Id 

CRMN l{K\DY-C:iT HOUSE COMPANY 

Mduufdvlure <iiid Construction of TTf\ii cpc 

HOUSTON. TEXAS 



SHERMAN-NELSON I n< 

Genenil (lontnictors 

San Jacinto rnist BIdj;. 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



STAR EEE(rrRIC & ENGINEERING CO. 

HOUSTON. TEXAS 

RADIO SETS 

lie I - Rudiola - U Hater Ken I - Majestic 

MOTION riCTl Ri:s 

fuistman Cine Kodak Hell &- lloirell 

and kodascujH's ('anierus and Projectors 

I'.iiMi M) M. I)i pREi; A. O. Greher ,|. B. Lindsay 

(il:i I'aniiiri St. I'n's. l')<)0 1<)1I Main St. 




"4 



i^'= 





r/ze WARWICK 

VUf Soiitli's (liicst ApartiiKMit 
Hotel and tlu- (•eiit<T ut Hous- 
ton's College anil Social Life. 

HOLSTON 



WHERE 

GOOD FELE( )WS 

GET 

TOGETHER 




"^^^^jm 







r/ie SAM HOUSTON 

200 R ns 200 Baths 

Every Room with ?aii and 

Running lee W ater. 

HOUSTON 



f 








BEAUMONT 

250 Rooms 250 Baths 

Make this voiir home when 

in Beaumont. 



r/ze BEN MILAM 

250 Rooms 250 jl.ill 

E\eiv modern eonvenii ik 
for vour comlorl. 
HOUSTON 



OPERATED 
FOR THE 
PUBLIC BY 



LEARY, MICKELSON & HALL 

HOUSTON AND BEAUMONT 



'Xji(t'' 



--'*^\i. 



1 


^ ^ 

■ 

Compliineuts of 

Bankers Mortgage Company 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 


O) 

f 




Economicdl Gets Appliduces 






"always at a, your service" 






HoiSTON OasIFiielCompany 

II A SUBSIDjIARY OF | 






\-UNITED GAS COMPANY-/ 






Jiood}; Sec^meMMa/ifff^ement 






Dependable Gas Service 






Ciiinpliniinls iif 


BALDWIN & CARGILL 






W. H. CURTIN & CO. 


1) hoU'suU' 






Il('a\\ Hardware and Mill Supplies 
l.ah()rator\ Apparatus and Kea^'cnts 


FKL nS AND PRODUCE 






HOUSTON, TEXAS 


HOUSTON - - TEXAS 




s 






= '*^ 


■ 
b) 



SSii, 



.^i§) 



THE HOUSE 
of 

HERTZBERG 



Founded 1878 



An old name, this, known and trusted from state to 
state . . . inspiring confidence through more than half 
a century's service . . . the sought for mark on every 
gift, for its presence there is a pledge oi highest quality, 
most expert craf tsnianship and utmost value obtainable. 

GIFTS 

FOR EVERY OCCASION 

BIRTHDAYS - SHOWERS - ENGAGEMENTS - WEDDINGS 
ANNIVERSARIES - CARD PARTIES - ATHLETIC EVENTS 




HERTZBERG 



'At the Sign 
ot the Clock' 



JEWELRY CO. 



SAN ANTONIO 



Houston St., 
cor. St. Marv's 



J 



qiii 



The 
UNION NATIONAL BANK 

OF HOUSTON, TEXAS 




Cap ltd I (I u d S u rp I us 
Two Million Dollars 



Coiiiplimeiits of 

KENNERLY, WILLIAMS, LEE, HILL & SEARS 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

PETROLEUM BUILDING, HOUSTON. TEXAS 



T. M. Kciiii.ily 
Fred L. Williams 
Jesse J. Lee 



Geo. A. Hill, Jr. 
Geo. D. Sears 
Irl F. Kennerlv 



W. H. Blades 
Alan B. Cameron 
T. E. Kennerly 



KLEIN'S 

PURE CREAM 

ICE CREAM 

McGOWEN AT BRAZOS 



WESSENDORF, NELMS & CO. 



TOOLS 



Machine Tools and Supplies 

(iarage and Shop Ivpiipment 



i57«'*'~ 



-'^b 





.T'S EASIER than selecting a 
card or writing a letter . . . and oh, the happiness it brings! 
Don't forget the folks back home on special occasions. 
fi^Let the telephone unite you with your loved ones more 
often. Long Distance mitigates the pain of separation. 
S^Miles away from home, trying to make your "mark" and 
feeling blue . . . remember — a chat with mother and dad or 
your best pal over the telephone is a sure cure. Try JL^ 



Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. 




jiiji) 



CLASSMATES 

As the years roll by, each month of May will be 
an anniversary bringing cherished memories of 
class days and commencement. For us, each May 
Day is an anniversary too, rounding out another 
year of trust and I)anking service faithfully 
])erformed. 

THE HOUSTON LAND & 
TRUST COMPANY 

Founded Mav 1. 1875 



Main at Franklin 



Houston, Texas 



Compliments 

of 
a Friend 



(Oct'* 





OWER SOURCES OF 

DEPENDABLE electric POWER 



GREAT electric generators in centrally locited 
stations supply energy to the transmission system 
of the Texas Power & Light Company. Electric power 
is thus furnished to over three hundred communiries 
in Texas. 

Transmission line electric service meets these 
increasing needs or the modern home in a manner 
impossible to an isolated power planr. 

Transmission line service is flexible, permitting of 
vast increase in power supply, quickly and economi- 
cally. Ir is dependable, making possible more than one 
source of power supply to a community. It is economi- 
cal, partaking of the economies of group management 
together with the greater efficiency and skill possible 
in an organization with a diversified scope of activity. 

The Texas Power & Light Company is the pioneer 
of transmission line electric service in Texas. 



TEXAS POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Providing for the Texas of Today — Planning for the Texas of Tomorrow 







TO THE STUDENTS AT RICE 

Ni)\N. llial aiiotlii'r scholaslic year lias passeil. 
and vou'ie (iiie \car nearer your yenture into 
the \v(irl(l of liut^iness. yve know tliat you're 
better prepared for this important task. Ilacli 
of us must make ready for this obhgalion. 
Stay with vour school - - finish the solid foun- 
dation which yon hayc started. 

Remember, y on're uehome at ( iohns - - any lime. 

Our Congratulations to the Graduating 

Seniors. Yours is an Ideal Foundation 

for \ our Life s B ork! 



,/tfJ.(bhnF"rniture @^^ 




WHOLBi 



NO < 



Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



®F^ 



■^S) 



u,. 







TRINITY helps Iniild RICE 




^^i^S|(*sfc'«*--^~ 



It is said thai ihv louitildliiiii under lliis 
well-knoiin Rice landmark is the largest 
piece of concrete in the Slatp of Texas. 



rrinitv Cement is lind in the lione and 
sinew of Rice traditions. Yon who are 
al)out to liid adien to Alma Mater will. 
as the years pass, ajipreciate more and 
more these traditions. 
Potlav the simple events of yesterday 
are simply eommonplaee events — to- 
morrow they will liecome your most 
ireasnred memories. 

Rice means mnrli to \(>m now — it will 
mean more and more as I he years roll 
on. The friendships formed here will 
Urow warmer and deari'r as time tein- 
|)ers them — and mellows tiieir charm- 
ing influence. 

W hen in later years, you have building 
needs of your own — will you not kindly 
remenil»er this worthy cement which is 
bound up with these dear memories? 
Class of '3(1. iiere's wishing vou all the 
luck in the worldl 



TRINITY 

THE DEPENDABLE BRAND OF PORTLAND 



C E 




N T 



THREE 



PLANTS 



I N 



T E X A S 



4. 



•^fe 



<Cli5»ii 



rfiiS) 







Jm%^ 



The Rice Co -Eds 

. . . who have learned to depend on 
llariis-llaldo for their clothes . . . have 
learned an important lesson tliat thev 
will earrv with them all throiii;h their 
lives. 

— 1 lull style is the thin" 

— tliiil (jiKilitY is essential 

— //(((/ correct dress j>lii\s tin inipiir- 
tant part in the cultural anil social 
ndvancement of iroinen 

— tliot this store sponsors nothiiifi hut 
ichiit has the hiilhesl eiulorsi'iiient of 
Idshioii 

Harris-Halilo Co. 

'HEART ()■ HOUSTON-- 



GENERAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY 
CORPORATION 



W holesdlers of Electric 
Aj)j)(ir(itiis (111(1 Supplies 



JlOLSTON 



Sa\ Amomo 



; ■ 



(3 N MAIN AT K L? S K 




?j|ii;iiii;i;r. a VSEs «i,-! 



The South "s Greatest Store 
for Men and Boys — With 
Smart Shops For ^ omen. 



Notliin<i But a Good Title Can Be 
Guaranteed by 



HOUSTON TITLE GUARANTY CO. 



p. 1155 



523 Post-Dispatch Building 



Dealy-Adey- Elgin Co, 



PRINTERS 

Manufacturing Stationers 
Phone Fairfax 1143 717 La Braiu li St. 



MANUFACTURERS 

Sulphiirif Acid Hydrocliloric \(iil 

Nitric Acid Bone Meal 

Animal Ciiarcoal Sodiiun Sulphate 

Sulphate of Alumina 

Texas Chemical Co. 



I fouston 
Baton Roui'c 



Fort Worth 
Bastrop. La. 



#^ 



■i 

;% 






Farrar Lumber Company 



Biiiklinji Material 



2 101 Texas Avenue 



I'lione Preston 0186 



Sunset Coffee 

"Its llimir Tells I'lic II liiile Storv" 

WM. D. CLEVELAND & SONS 

HOUSTON, TFAAS 



J. S. Abercromki i: President 

Mdmond L. Lc)iii:iiN J'ice-Presi<leiil & General Matwger 

A. K. I'lNcniiR Secretary 

CAMERON IRON WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

OIL WELL SPECIALTIES 



711 Mill.v Streel 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Preston 028 1 



WILLIE OWENS 
Letter Service 

Cotton Excliange Biiildinf; 
Iloiislon, Texas 



W adeiiian s Viitivers 
Bring Haiipv Hours 

TWO STORES 

.■5106 \Taiii Street 1021 Rusk Ave.. 

Hadley3ni Fairfax 3221 



cr^ 



QSii, 





N Many of Jloiiston's Most Pala- 
tial Homes One Finds tlie Quality-mark 
of Stouers" Furniture and (he Genius 
ol Stowers" Decorators Por- 
trayed in Luxurious Appoint- 
ments That Ron alt V, 
Donlilless, Would Fnvy! 



^'■\ 1 



fspw'E 



'29 ic(;;-.s" I )<'j)i luldhli- Scnit 



Perfecto Cleaning & Dye Works 

20 \ ears' Satisfactory Service 

FANNIN and TUAM PHONE F \IRF W 33.U 



The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 

The DAVID J. 

MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



Gxtn Malloy Made 
Comt btar, ihi. 



©^ 



51^,= 



cjiie 





An Institution Of Paris Modes 




lSo\ (I matter of dollars but of sense 
The fashion-wise woman is thrifty 



Compliments of 

L. R. C. TOWLES 



COTTON BROKER 



Cotton Exchange Building 



Houston, Texas 



Hogan-Allnocli Dry Goods Co. 

WHOLESALE 

Dry Goods, Notions, Men's Furnishing Goods 
and Ladies' Ready to W ear 



Texas Avenue and Austin Street 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 



W. P. HAMBLEN 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

Ifouston Texas 



Im ' % .» :% ,a -' a-, C- ■,*■ i^ . S 




Preston 493t1 109 Main St. Houston 






■'*^b 



CAMPANILE 



Printed and Bound by 
The Rein Company 




Rein on your Frnitnig 
IS like Sterling on Silver 



The Rein Company 



Buffalo Drive 



Houston, Texas 



(OTP' 



ij^b) 



@^ 



,^« 1 




— ^oo'~aNjic_ 



The student of 

today is a 

leader toinorroiv 




PARKE ENGRAVING 
COMPANY 

Houston. Texas 



g^ 



4 



r- 



jjlSi 



WALLIS 

The Student Corner 



^•) 



TfiulliN JI77 



Tla,ll,-\ 2171 



Hills l>y 

BORSOLINO 

of luily 



RENON'S 



LAMAR 




GODnOB 

TEXm 



1 () I (. 



Main 




Suits slyh'd 

in 
lliill\ II (111(1 



Fasliioiis of I'omorroiv 

\Vail<- W. li.ckinaii ^'<'<'l < - ^ illis 



Houston Car Wbocl and 
Machine (^(»inj>an\ 

I loii^lori. Ti'xas 

Mdiiii l(i( Unci s (</ 

GRAY IRON CASTIN(;S 

(:\K W IIEFT.S - I'ATTKRNS 

MACHINE \\(JRKS AND lOKGINC; 



THE NEW HEALTH CEREAL 



WHITE 
HOUSE 




NATURAL BfiOWN RICE 



Made from NATURAL BROWN RTCl-: 
Contains ALL tlicBKVN 
Ricli in Mineral Salts aiul tlic 
Essentail VITAMIN "B" 

Dclicidiis iiilli C.rcdni or I'niil Juice 

STA^DAKJ) RICE COMPANY. Inc. 



57«^ 



f" 



511 Main Slr.'cl 



Ciiiujiliiufnls (ij 




Tliree Stores 

rosT.DispvTr.ii Rr[LDiN(; 



807 Main Street 






Tile M(l',\()^ orjianizalioii lias a lii;ili 

regard lur llic in\alMalilf conlrihiilioiis 

of enfiineeriiif; tii thi' |iraill(al liiisiiifss 

ol |ir<Mln<'in;: oil. 



J. H. McEvov & C(i. 



I loN>l<>n. Texas 



Small 
{jtjuircl 

for 
Men 




JOS. F. MEYER CO. 

"Over Fifty i ears L iider One Managenienl' 



ililiers (if 



I! \I)I().|IK\\ V II \KI)\\ \Ki:- AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 



ti()2-ai2 Franklin V> 



I'lione l're^l(.n :i(W7 



OT^ 



■4 



i 



•i' r» 



Diiij;s — Toilet Arliclt's 



I'criodicals — (;ifls 



THE 



iiiiiiijjiiiiiiiiiBimi 



jis: alililj.liHJH'BilJil l|l,|iHllliMllJBiMl 




rrrrnif 



\. 



INC. 



Curb sen i(v from hreiikfasl till midniiihl 



W III I II KIM > and M ifs Sa\ lor s ( iainlv 



'asl licliverv service 



3100 Main Street 



Phones Hadley 2101-2102 



( onipliinctils 



of 

PUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 

(UkI 

TRUST COMPANY 






-•^ 



.«^s> 



W. R. SALTER 

I'liiiilci 1111(1 Dcciiniltir 

QUALITY 

Distinctive Interior Decordtinff 
Durdhle (]on\mer<i(d l\iiiiliiw 



J I lO NdiiIi Main .Suoci 



JIdusIoii, Tf\a> 



DESEL-BOETTCHER CO. 

iMcoiii'iiii \ ri;i.) 

1 iiiportcis ;iii(l \\ liolcsalc Dealers in 

FRl IT, \E(;ETABLE8, I'KODICK. SUNDRY (iKOCKKIl^S 
SPECIALTIES, EGGS, H\ E AND DRESSED POl l/lin 

Slalc \i;cnt,s for Silver Kiii^ (Jiiif^or Ale. Fizz ami ()raiii;i- I )r\ 
Houston IJislrihulors (or (Jrazv Water 




J 



Cle^iunp-uycing Ohoppt 



\ SERVICE FOR 

I ) I SCRIM INATI NG VVA ) PEE 

Who insist on a eerlain i|nalil\ 
o( smartness and dislinelion in 
llieir wardrolM'. 

'M Triilv Ufliulilr. [ilislir CInuicr- -Dm" 
:i(t(l(l (Caroline jtKd. liadlcN HKiH 



THE HADEN COMPANY 

Largest Distrilmtor^ ol Nhid SIr'II in llic W orlil 

SHELL -SA\D-(;K WEE 

Miiiiiilni lliii'i s <ij Sliiiic I lie 



i'airlav (il IL 



J 720 Shepherd 



•A 



■ •''fi ) 



B'lrcp Confections; 



Where (jiKilitv rei>j,ns supreme 



Shire \ti. I 

1016 MAIN STREET 
belireen Met. — Loevv 
Phone- I'airfax V,;',M 



Shin- \ii. 2 

:]2()0 MAIN STREET 

Cor. Miiiri anil I'.l^in 
I'honr lladl.-N !;i:2l 



Free (jitu k (lelirery serriee 



Catcriiiii to ('.andics and Ice ('.rcarn lor Special Parti 



YOUNG MEN WHO KNOW— TRADE HEKE !'( K). 




HOI STON S BEST SHOP KOK ME\ 

B/irringer|K N\)rtonC9. 

TAILORS \^y/ CLOTHIERS 

506 Main 






t 
*^|® 



r= 



.1*^ 



C.oinplinifiils of 



A FRIEND 



I/i appreciation (or the patronage of Rice students 
(luring the past year 

Texas Photo Supply Co. 



1019 Main Stri'ct 



Phone Fairfax 8124 
Night Phone Lehigh 5391 



Compliments of 
\OV\l CLEANER 




IMioiif Preslon 2W() 
"f? here (leaniuii is a Science^ 






Galveston's ''Suppi-Jdlue'' Store 

Visitors, as well as our regular customers, are always pleased 
with the attentiveness of our personnel, and the ever present 
"A^en'nes.s'" of our ap]>arel for men, women, and ehildren. 

Rol)t. I. Cohen 

GALVESTON, TEXAS 






Compliments of 



BAKER, BOTTS, 
PARKER AND 
GAR WO D 



E S P E R S N BUTE I) 1 N G 



10^ •>© 



ti,- \ \ -..• 



Qili. 



._,^^^ 



'(irccliiiiis to (ill sliidcnls and <:\-slii(lciils of /x'/cc" 



Federal Trust Company 



10 Texas \vcinic 



I'lioiic Prcsloii ir)(ii; 



DRINK 




Whether it be for a ('ifl — 
Or your own use^ <■■ , 

1 ( it came rroin 

Lechenger's 

It lias a distinction 

all its own " .'■ 



Leclicnger Prices arc moderate 

and fair — Alike to everv 

patron. 




Complinwuls of 




EXCLVSIIK HIT INEXPENSH E 






-'*^ 






». ' ■ '■ , . 



» ' ^ 'S- 



••■*,•• 



-Mf- 



^^ 



-»